Agriculture Land Articles

  • How a new way of thinking about soil sparked a national movement in agriculture

    For three weeks every month, Ray Archuleta captivates audiences with a few handfuls of soil. He begins with two clumps, dropping them into water. The soil from a farm where the soil isn’t tilled holds together, while the tilled soil immediately disperses, indicating poor soil structure. Next, volunteers from the audience — mostly farmers and ranchers — pour water over a soil ...


    By Ensia

  • Assessment of groundwater vulnerability to nitrate pollution caused by agricultural practices

    Environmental risk assessment is a step towards identification, analysis, and classification of risk factors and thus reduction of the possibility of adverse consequences. In this research, a novel approach for environmental risk assessment on groundwater pollution is applied. By combination of aquifer vulnerability DRASTIC map, pollution severity and prioritizing of the plain regions by the ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Changing climate changes soils

    Varied predictions for soil organic matter as climate changes The hottest months. The snowiest winters. Catastrophic floods and droughts. Climate change impacts lives across the world in drastic and unpredictable ways. This unpredictability also extends to the more subtle – yet still important – effects of climate change. For example, it is ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Worms & Black Castings for an Abundance of Healthy Crops

    Earthworms are more than just good fishing buddies, they naturally incorporate organic material into the soil, increasing the amount of microbes, improving the health of the soil, and increasing plant productivity. Both worms and black castings from worms provide your garden or farm with a nutrient rich and robust environment, able to ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Non-chemical Pre-plant Soil Disinfestation

    The battle with pests, diseases and weeds is an everyday problem for every farmer. Due to the fact that 40% of the world’s food production is lost due to pests and diseases, farmers need to manage crop protection. An excellent example of the need for pesticides is cotton. It is a crop that is affected by various pests. Cotton farming accounts for more than 25% of all insecticides and 12% of ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Five Ways to Manage the Soil for Planting

    The soil, as the primary resource for food production and the most important tool for every farmer, is crucial for farming. Successful farming begins with the quality soil, which provides water and essential nutrients to the crops. Rich and healthy soil, combined with the appropriate amount of water and sunlight can significantly contribute to global food production. Proper soil management ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • Getting Down to the Roots: Why Soil Matters for Climate Stabilization (and More)

    Following 2015’s designation as the International Year of Soils by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, soil carbon sequestration is experiencing something of a renaissance among policy and scientific circles. Farmers are also getting involved, most recently through the Climate Leaders program of the National ...


    By The Climate Trust

  • Phosphorus sorption kinetics and sorption capacity in agricultural drainage ditch sediments in reclaimed land, Kasaoka Bay, Japan

    Equilibrium analysis is essential to evaluate sorption capacity and to determine whether sediment acts as a source or sink of phosphorus (P). This study was carried out to determine whether or not the sediment in drainage ditches acts as a source or sink of P, evaluate phosphorus sorption kinetics, and determine the potential P sorption by using the Langmuir isotherm sorption model. Surface ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Estimation of the degree of soil P saturation from Brazilian Mehlich-1 P data and field investigations on P losses from agricultural sites in Minas Gerais

    The degree of phosphorus saturation (DPS) of agricultural soils is studied worldwide for risk assessment of phosphorus (P) losses. In previous studies, DPS could be reliably estimated from water-soluble P (WSP) for European and Brazilian soils. In the present study, we correlated measured WSP and Mehlich-1 P (M1P) from soils of Minas Gerais (MG) and Pernambuco (PE) (R2 = 0.94, ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Assessing the promotion of urine-diverting dry toilets through school-based demonstration facilities in Kalisizo, Uganda

    Urine-diverting dry toilets (UDDTs) are designed to recover nutrients and organic matter from human excreta for agricultural reuse. Their wider implementation could help address problems in areas where water scarcity limits coverage of sanitation systems and declining soil fertility jeopardizes nutritional security. Demonstration facilities can improve stakeholders’ views of UDDTs; however, it ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Global transcriptomic profiling in barramundi Lates calcarcifer from rivers impacted by differing agricultural land‐uses

    Most catchments discharging into the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon have elevated loads of suspended sediment, nutrients, and pesticides, including photosystem II inhibiting herbicides, associated with upstream agricultural land use. To investigate potential impacts of declining water quality on fish physiology, RNASeq was used to characterize and compare the hepatic transcriptomes of ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Surface energy balance algorithm for land-based consumption water use of different land use-cover types in arid-semiarid regions

    Spatiotemporal distributions of water consumption for various land use-cover types over the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia were estimated using Surface Energy Balance Algorithm. Water consumption of various land use and cover classes shows similar seasonal dynamic trends. The spatial distribution of annual actual evapotranspiration (AET) shows low values in the Empty Quarter (231–438 mm/yr), ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Soil organic matter content effects on dermal pesticide bioconcentration in American toads (Bufo americanus)

    Pesticides have been implicated as a major factor in global amphibian declines and may pose great risk to terrestrial phase amphibians moving to and from breeding ponds on agricultural landscapes. Dermal uptake from soil is known to occur in amphibians, but predicting pesticide availability and bioconcentration across soil types is not well understood. This study was designed to compare uptake ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Leaching of dissolved phosphorus from tile-drained agricultural areas

    We investigated leaching of dissolved phosphorus (P) from 45 tile-drains representing animal husbandry farms in all regions of Denmark. Leaching of P via tile-drains exhibits a high degree of spatial heterogeneity with a low concentration in the majority of tile-drains and few tile-drains (15% in our investigation) having high to very high concentration of dissolved P. The share of dissolved ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Morphological and transcriptional responses of Lycopersicon esculentum to hexavalent chromium in agricultural soil

    The carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic effects of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to living organisms through food chain raise the immediate need to assess the potential toxicological impacts of Cr(VI) on human health. Therefore, the concentration‐dependent responses of 12 Cr(VI)‐responsive genes selected from the high‐throughput Lycopersicon esculentum cDNA microarray were examined at ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Turning abandoned rice fields into mangroves

    What do you do when mangroves fail to naturally recolonise abandoned rice fields in one of the most precious mangrove deltas of the world? Pieter van Eijk reports on a recent mission to Western Africa that paves the way for large-scale mangrove recovery through a so-called ‘ecological restoration’ approach. ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Sustainable Soil Health

    “A Nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt. We have learned some harsh lessons about how to treat our soil. While most of us are aware of the problems of the past, some agricultural operations in the world are not heeding those lessons. We all know that healthy soil is essential to feed the ever-increasing ...

  • Playing hide and seek below the soil

    Below the soil of a diverse grassland area you’ll find a jungle of plant roots. It is also home to a wide variety of bacteria and fungi, of which some are pathogenic and looking for a host in the tangle of roots. It appears that this is much more difficult when there is a larger diversity of plants as the host plant is more able to hide among the varied crowd. Greater plant diversity ...

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