Agriculture Land News

  • Writing an equation for soil success

    Soil isn’t one size fits all. It may look the same under your feet – but under a microscope, that’s a different story. A plant’s roots, tiny bugs – these things can tell one soil from another quite easily. Soil scientists typically measure different aspects of soil — how much air it contains, how well it retains water, heat, and more — to ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • `We need a new approach for better soil`

    ‘Dutch agricultural soils are not future-proof’ was a widely accepted statement at the final meeting of the Public Private Partnership (PPP) Sustainable Soil. Breeders, chain partners, suppliers, the government and the science sector see a gradual deterioration in soil quality and are joining forces within the PPP to find a solution. “It isn’t a simple matter,” says ...

  • Soil moisture for crop health topic of symposium

    Soil moisture sensing through either contact or remote technology captures soil-plant-water information that relates closely with plant water availability and use. Innovations in remote sensing technologies can inform plant health assessments and more. The “Soil Moisture Sensing for Crop Health Assessment and Management” symposium planned at the Resilience Emerging ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Restore Life to Your Soil With Vermaplex/Black Worm Castings

    Farmers and gardeners alike are looking for ways to improve the health of their soil and ability to store water for drought relief. The United States Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service released its “Unlock the Secrets in the Soil” campaign, ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Semios Special Offer Provides Soil Moisture Monitoring Solution Free to Precision Farming Customers for Two Years.

    Semios, the provider of real-time agricultural information for precision farming, offers two years of free soil moisture monitoring for their customers to optimize irrigation efficiencies, improving crop quality and yield. CEO Michael Gilbert said, “Water shortages have been tough for farmers. By fine-tuning irrigation to where and when it is most needed, farmers can protect their crops ...


    By Semios

  • Keeping a pulse on the soil

    Leaving behind stubble is not ideal when shaving, but it’s a good practice to leave behind crop “stubble” after harvest. According to soil scientist Frank Larney, crop residue anchors the soil against wind and water erosion. Avoiding bare soils is one part of a soil conservation package he and his research team demonstrate in a 12-year experiment growing pulses in southern ...

  • Ontario Updating Soil Map to Support Farmers` Environmental Stewardship Effort

    In celebrating Earth Day, Ontario is partnering with the Government of Canada on a new soil mapping initiative that will contribute to the growing understanding of how land use patterns have changed by using new and up to date technologies. With an investment of $5.1 million through Growing Forward 2, the new data collected by the soil mapping initiative will help farmers adjust ...

  • The Quest ATR is perfect for testing soil

    The ecological health of soil can be monitored with the Quest ATR. The organic and mineral components of soil can be established by testing with ATR-IR spectroscopy. Check your plants/crops/etc have the right nutrients for good health. Make sure there is enough calcium, not too much nitrogen or carbon. Map large areas according to the deficit or abundance of minerals. The ...


    By Specac Limited

  • HydraProbe selected to be used in Canada’s RISMA Network for Agricultural Monitoring

    A new study published in the Soil Science Society of America Journal investigated the field performance of 5 soil moisture instruments in heavy clay soils in the RISMA network. The HydraProbe outperformed TDR and capacitance-based soil sensors in terms of stability and accuracy in Manitoba’s agricultural soil. Much of soil in the Canadian Prairie ...

  • Review reveals problems protecting workers from pesticides

    Dozens of farmworkers looked up at the little yellow plane buzzing over the Florida radish field, a mist of pesticide falling from its wings. Farmworkers are supposed to be protected by government rules regulating exposure to toxic farm chemicals. But in this case, the breeze pushed the pesticide over the crew in a neighboring field, where it fell mostly on women, including at least one who was ...


    By Associated Press

  • Flood risk from modern agricultural practices can be mitigated with interventions

    In the face of substantial evidence that modern land use management practices have increased runoff at the local scale, a new study reveals changes in local land use management practices can reduce the risk of local flooding. However, there is little evidence so far that these local increases in runoff culminate in large-scale flooding effects. To address this lack of evidence, the researchers ...

  • Meet Moringa at Jaipur in Nov`2015 with real farming Manifesto

    The Advanced Biofuel Center(CJP) is delighted to announce the 2 Day Moringa State of Art International Workshop viz. Global Moringa World – 2015 to be held on 21- 22 November 2015 at Jaipur, India. India meets more than 80% demand of Moringa Products and thereby enjoying dominant position in the World Moringa Scenario. The global Moringa Products market estimated to be over US$ 4 billion is ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • Soil Scout selected as 2015 Red Herring Winner

    Soil Scout, provider of innovative ground measuring solutions for the agriculture, forest and environmental industries, has been selected as a winner of the 2015 Red Herring Europe award. Red Herring’s Top 100 has become a mark of distinction for identifying promising new companies and entrepreneurs. Red Herring’s editors were among the first to recognize that companies such ...


    By Soil Scout Ltd

  • The effects of agricultural land use change on farmland birds in Sweden

    The effects of changing agricultural practices on farmland birds are explored in a recently published study from Sweden. Overall abundance of 16 common species declined by 23% between 1994 and 2004, which may be partly caused by changes in land use, such as an increase in the amount of wheat cropland. However, effects vary between species, and some species increased or stayed stable in number. ...

  • Towards COP21: scientists promote Climate-Smart Agriculture to tackle climate change

    Climate-Smart Agriculture offers the opportunity to design best options to tackle food security as well as to reach a resilient agriculture that also contributes to mitigating climate change. This is a common conviction shared by the scientific community that convened at the 3rd Global Science Conference on Climate-Smart Agriculture, held in Montpellier, France on 16-18 March 2015. Scientists ...

  • Climate change to shift global spread and quality of agricultural land

    New areas of land suitable for agriculture will open up under climate change’s effects, new research predicts, particularly in far northern regions of the world. However, the overall quality of land for farming will decline and many regions, including Europe, could lose large areas of suitable land. Demand for agricultural products is expected to rise by 70–110% by 2050. This is ...

  • Protecting against erosion after wildfire

    Soil erosion after wildfire can be substantially reduced by using a combination of sowing grass seeds and protecting the soil with a layer of straw, a Spanish study suggests. The authors of the research found that, although seeding alone made little difference, the combination of straw mulch and seeding reduced soil erosion by 93%. The European countries that are worst affected by wildfires are ...

  • Wind erosion risk mapped in first ever pan-European assessment

    Over 8% of land in Europe could be at moderate-to-high risk of wind-driven soil erosion, a new study has estimated. In the first assessment of its kind, the researchers produced maps which show wind erosion risk across 36 countries. This information could help guide actions to tackle land degradation. Soil erosion by wind is, to a certain extent, a natural process that has always played a role in ...

  • Organic Farming not Necessarily Best for Environment

    Speaking to The Guardian this week, Lord Krebs, an advisor to ministers on how to adapt to climate change, described how organic farming could actually be worse for the climate than conventional farming methods, due to the greater land use required and the methods implemented. Speaking to the Oxford Farming Conference he suggested that agricultural methods known as ‘no till’, which ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • Natural fortification against typhoons

    “The low number of casualties of this typhoon compared to Haiyan can be attributed to good disaster preparedness and timely evacuation, and the fact that there was no storm surge”, states Merijn van Leeuwen of Wetlands International, who is currently in the Philippines. Although the fatalities are less, the impact of typhoons like Haiyan and Hagupit can be disastrous to infrastructure ...


    By Wetlands International

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you