Apiculture & Honey Farming Articles

  • The newest strategy for saving bees is really, really old

    With pollinators in decline around the world, conservationists turn to traditional farmers for answers. In northwestern India, the Himalaya Mountains rise sharply out of pine and cedar forests. The foothills of the Kullu Valley are blanketed with apple trees beginning to bloom. It’s a cool spring morning, and Lihat Ram, a farmer in Nashala village, shows me a ...


    By Ensia

  • Thiamethoxam: Assessing flight activity of honeybees foraging on treated oilseed rape using RFID technology

    This study was designed to assess homing behaviour of bees foraging on winter oilseed rape grown from seed treated with thiamethoxam (as Cruiser OSR) with one field drilled with thiamethoxam treated seed and two control fields drilled with fungicide‐only treated seed. Twelve honeybee colonies were used per treatment group, 4 each located at the field edge (on‐field site), at approximately 500m ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Dancing Bees Waggle the Way to Happier Habitat

    Honeybee waggle dancers are helping researchers identify conservation best practices. The question scientists at the University of Sussex in the U.K. had was simple: Where do honeybees find food? But finding a way to answer that simple question seemed not so simple. Tiny radio or GPS trackers have a limited range, and it would take huge amount of work to survey fields on foot. Instead, ...


    By Ensia

  • Fipronil and imidacloprid reduce honeybee mitochondrial activity

    Bees have a crucial role in pollination; therefore, it is important to determine the causes of their recent decline. Fipronil and imidacloprid are insecticides used worldwide to eliminate or control insect pests. Because they are broad‐spectrum insecticides, they can also affect honeybees. Many researchers have studied the lethal and sublethal effects of these and other insecticides on ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Risks of neonicotinoid insecticides to honeybees

    The European honeybee, Apis mellifera, is an important pollinator of agricultural crops. Since 2006, when unexpectedly high colony losses were first reported, articles have proliferated in the popular press suggesting a range of possible causes and raising alarm over the general decline of bees. Suggested causes include pesticides, genetically modified crops, habitat fragmentation, and ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Evaluating exposure and potential effects on honeybee brood (Apis mellifera) development using glyphosate as an example

    This study aimed to develop an approach to evaluate potential effects of plant protection products on honeybee brood with colonies at realistic worst‐case exposure rates. The approach comprised two stages. In the first stage, honeybee colonies were exposed to a commercial formulation of glyphosate applied to flowering Phacelia tanacetifolia with glyphosate residues quantified in relevant ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Lost in the Bee-Line

    Pesticides. Sprayed across vast expanses of farm land, they have become a ubiquitous part of industrial agriculture. But there may actually be more consequences to their use than we had previously predicted. A recent study headed by Chensheng Lu at Harvard University connects the rising phenomena of beehive abandonment, known as Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), to the use of a family of pesticides ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

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