Crop Research Articles

  • Researchers model ways to control deadly maize disease

    Researchers have used mathematical modelling to develop techniques to combat two co-infecting viruses causing maize lethal necrosis (MLN) in Kenya. According to researchers who conducted the new study, because maize is a staple crop in Sub-Saharan Africa, the spread of MLN is ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • The risks of spreading slurry after first silage cut

    Livestock farmers spreading slurry onto fields after first-cut grass silage face heightened risks of contamination after this year’s early start to the season, a silage specialist is warning, especially if following the current trend to more frequent silage cutting.The risks of spreading slurry after first silage cut According to Ecosyl silage expert, Darran Ward, spreading slurry after ...


    By Volac International Ltd.

  • How Coffee Rust Affects The Coffee Industry Worldwide

    The coffee rust epidemic has reached a lot of countries all over the world and has been a major problem and threat to coffee plantations all over the world. The rust organism mainly attacks the leaves (though in some rare instances the rust was found on fruits and young stems.). The coffee rust is usually manifested by chlorotic young lessions or pale yellow spots before the sporulation is ...


    By BioNovelus Inc.

  • A call to conserve crops’ wild cousins

    Wild cousins aren’t always appreciated at family gatherings. But when it comes to crops, the opposite is often true: Plant breeding has historically relied on genes from plants growing in the wild as a source of diversity that can be introduced into crop plants to produce new crop varieties that are more resilient, nutritious and productive than those currently cultivated. As human ...


    By Ensia

  • The Latest in Whitefly Control

    Next month’s Greenhouse Canada Grower Day is welcoming leading researchers and crop specialists to help you tackle one of the industry’s biggest challenges. Whitefly is proving to be one of the most difficult pests to control, mainly due to the lack of effective registered chemicals that can eradicate silverleaf whitefly. It is also due to the unwillingness of biological suppliers to ...

  • Can superfoods boost the planet’s health, too?

    As demand for African and Asian tree-based superfoods grows, researchers and entrepreneurs eye ways to maximize benefits for the environment. It can seem like new health food fads pop up every week — fads that often fade as quickly as they appear. Two gaining steam lately, though, may be worth a longer look: baobab and moringa. Traditional fare in parts of Africa (and for moringa, ...


    By Ensia

  • New study finds recycled phosphorus could fertilize 100 percent of U.S. corn

    The world has a problem. A phosphorus problem. Needed to fertilize crops, the bulk of phosphorus comes from nonrenewable phosphate rock. While China mines the most — producing almost half the world’s phosphorus — Morocco alone controls three-fourths of global phosphate rock reserves. Year by year those global reserves ...


    By Ensia

  • Can genetic engineering help quench crops’ thirst?

    Researchers around the world are exploring how GMO technology might boost food production under hot, dry conditions. Roger Deal is trying to figure out how plants remember drought. An assistant professor of biochemistry and genetics at Emory University, Deal says most plants have a kind of memory for stress. When experiencing water shortage, for example, plants close ...


    By Ensia

  • Crop gene banks are preserving the future of agriculture. But who’s preserving them?

    As climate change makes crop diversity even more important, gene banks struggle to stay afloat. During the past few years of civil war in Syria, rebel fighters have destroyed Shia mosques and Christian graves, and burned and looted Christian churches while the Islamic State group has demolished priceless artifacts in the region. Nothing seemed sacred to the disparate ...


    By Ensia

  • Could traditional plants hold the secret to saving crops from pests?

    Researchers build on age-old practices to reduce food loss in Africa Without any effort at all, Hawa Saidi Ibura crushes dried beans, one at a time, between her fingers outside her home in Endagaw, a village in northern Tanzania. She’s holding a basket of a type of red bean eaten all over East Africa, but these beans ...


    By Ensia

  • Rotary batch blender mixes biological products that boost farm crops

    Agriculture has never been more challenging and fertility efficiency tools, such as inoculants, more important. Modern farmers rely on technology and production practices to significantly increase the yield of their food crops. Biological products like inoculants are a vital part of that strategy. Novozymes Biologicals is an industry leader in developing and manufacturing inoculants, which are a ...

  • Indian government still ‘flip flopping’ on GM trials

    In August, India’s ruling nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) stopped its legislators from accepting Monsanto sponsorship to attend a farm exhibition in the US state of Iowa. On the surface this might seem strange: attending the Farm Progress Show should be innocuous, as Monsanto routinely takes farmers, industry experts, media and MPs from various countries to visit the show and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Wastes as fertilizer – Is this a way to lower food costs?

    Researchers in the UK think they may have found a way to produce fertilizers that should cut farmers’ costs and at the same time boost some types of renewable energy. Their scheme, which involves using waste material from anaerobic digesters and ash from burnt biomass, would also cut fossil fuel use and save natural resources. ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Economic valuation of maize farming profitability under climate change adaptation in Benin, West Africa

    The major attempt of this paper is to analyse the profitability of maize farming in relation with observed climate change adaptation strategies. The study was conducted in Benin by a survey method on 336 maize producers. About 91% of the respondents undertook at least one adaptation strategy towards climate change. The observed strategies were categorised in four groups, including crop ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Benefits of minimum tillage case study

    In Hungary, the MARGINS project is being conducted near Lake Balaton - the largest lake in Central Europe. The lake is renowned for its beauty and wildlife. Its surrounding hilly landscape is covered with rich brown forest soil. This landscape is, however, prone to soil erosion -in particular, rills develop when soil is weakened by excessive tillage and exposed to intense rainstorms. If not ...


    By Syngenta

  • Cheap chemicals entice caterpillar-eating wasps to crops

    It may be a win-win situation: treating seeds with commercially available growth promoters before planting could have the added benefit of attracting parasitic wasps that feed on caterpillar pests, suggests a study. The protective effect of these cheap, commercially available chemicals, known as ‘plant strengtheners’, can help protect young ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Investing in people and evidence for sustainable farming

    Evaluation of farming systems, new ideas and learning with practitioners should be part of a transformed agriculture. Food security is difficult to pin down. It can be explained simply as access to enough food. But behind that simplicity lies an interconnected web of factors — from food prices to ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Using coir as a growing susbstrate - sustainably and ethically

    Manufactured from the inner husk of coconuts, coir is, but its very nature, produced in distant, and often developing, countries. This means that there is also an ethical slant to consider, as well as the question of shipping costs and carbon use. As retailers apply more pressure on their suppliers to focus on sustainability and ethics, these points are becoming increasingly important. Growers ...


    By Botanicoir Ltd

  • Paving the way for tech transfer

    A new UN body to advise nations on climate tech may break the deadlock in the long-running debate on transferring technology finds Joanna Carpenter. Rich nations have the technological know-how needed for poor nations to develop — but how do you deliver it without compromising the ...


    By SciDev.Net

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