Crop Research News

  • GMO crops could expect a brighter future

    One of the touchier areas of scientific research – in much of Europe, at least – is the genetic manipulation of food plants, seaweed and algae to try to produce more food or provide better rates of conversion into biofuels. But across the Atlantic genetically-modified crops (GMOs) are increasingly a different story. They are a deeply controversial subject ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Advanced Biofuel Center announces Couple Biodiesel oil Crops progress

    The Advanced Biofuel Center  (ABC) recently announced progress on its work with its mission "more Biodiesel oil per hectare" by developing two or more dedicated Biodiesel Crops in same acreage and that without extra inputs.  According to the ABC, it has developed a highly productive procedure and system of plantation of a couple of oil crops in same land area and a set of best practices ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • Parasitic plants cause huge damage to rice crops in Africa

    Parasitic plants – plants that penetrate another plant and grow at its expense – have caused some $200 million worth of damage to the African rice harvest this year, at the cost of 15 million meals a day. If no effective measures are developed and implemented against these parasites, the damage will increase over the coming years by some $30 million a year. This has been revealed by a ...

  • AgBiome Granted Multi-year Award to Discover Biological Solutions to Diseases Affecting Subsistence Crops of Sub-Saharan Africa

    The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has awarded AgBiome a new multi-year grant, entitled “Broad-Spectrum Biological Control of Fungal Diseases,” which will fund the evaluation and development of lead, proprietary biological fungicides in the fields of African smallholder farmers. The aim of the project is to identify and validate biological fungicides to control one or more of ...


    By AgBiome, Inc.

  • Assessing crop damages after extreme weather

    Original story at MIT News Producing torrential rain and wind gusts exceeding 180 miles per hour as it made landfall in the Philippines, Typhoon Haiyan left more than 6,000 dead and 4 million homeless. The November 2013 storm also obliterated thousands of ...

  • ISRIC releases upgraded SoilGrids system: up to two times improved accuracy of predictions

    ISRIC – World Soil Information has just released a major update of its global predictions of soil properties and classes, now available at a spatial resolution of 250 m. The previous SoilGrids system at 1 km resolution has been systematically upgraded and the accuracy of the predictions has been improved (up to two times) compared to the previous predictions. The new version of SoilGrids ...

  • Taller, thinner crop beds save money, water, other resources

    Looking out over thousands of acres of tomatoes, Miguel Talavera, director of East Coast growing operations at Pacific Tomato Grower, Ltd., marvels at the narrow lanes of fruit that are thriving in the hot Florida sun. Talavera credits increase in yield and a decrease in the use of fumigants to a collaboration with researchers and Extension faculty at the University of Florida Institute of Food ...

  • Race is on to feed warming world

    It can take up to 30 years to improve a crop variety, test it and persuade farmers to adopt it. That means the speed of climate change in Africa could make a new variety of maize useless even before the first harvest, according to new research. But two separate studies that address the challenge of food security in a rapidly ...


    By Climate News Network

  • UF/IFAS method detects 83% of immature citrus; helping cut costs

    GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers have found a new way to detect immature citrus 83 percent of the time, which lets growers know where to apply fertilizer and water and perhaps save on labor costs for the $10.9 billion a year Florida industry. By detecting green, immature citrus more accurately and efficiently, ...

  • Cooler Weather Conditions, Late Planting, Impacts Insects on Crops

    Rainy, cooler weather experienced recently throughout the region means slugs may be on the rise in some field crops, says an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The rains combined with colder temperatures are ideal slug weather, said Kelley Tilmon, a field crop entomologist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Field Day Offers Tips on Wheat Management

    Growers can learn more about wheat management techniques from experts from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University during Wheat Field Day June 21.   The event is from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at the Northwest Agricultural Research Station of the Ohio Agricultural Research and ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Weather Fluctuations Impact Soybeans Less Than Other Field Crops

    From freezing temperatures and snow flurries to sunny, 80-degree days in a span of a week — if this type of strange weather continues, growers across Ohio want to know, will this have a negative impact on soybean crops? Not really, according to a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.   Laura Lindsey, a soybean ...


    By Ohio State University

  • UF/IFAS research may give new hope to expanding avocado production

    Findings from new University of Florida research may lead growers to produce avocados in the Indian River region of Florida, an area where the citrus industry has fallen on hard times. The research comes from a dissertation by Cristina Pisani, who recently completed her doctorate in horticultural sciences at the University of Florida Indian River Research and Education Center near Fort Pierce. ...

  • Bringing nitrogen out to pasture

    Cows in Brazil might start bellowing "leguuume" rather than "moo." That's because Jose Dubeux Jr. wants to plant more legume trees in cow pastures. Dubeux is an assistant professor of Agronomy at North Florida Research & Education Center. Growing up, Dubeux spent a lot of time on his grandparents' farm in Brazil. There he developed a passion for livestock operations and the grasslands on ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • 97 Teams Enter Global Vertical Farming Award

    The Association for Vertical Farming and Illumitex are proud to announce 97 teams from 24 countries are competing for the AVF award, the first global vertical farming competition of it’s kind. On March 28, Vice Chair of the Association for Vertical Farming, Henry Gordon-Smith, hosted a Reddit “Ask Me Anything” with the ‘father’ of vertical farming, Dickson ...


    By Illumitex Inc.

  • Farmers’ use of renewable fertilisers to be revolutionised by new research

    Farmers’ and growers’ confidence in digestate and compost has been given a welcome boost, as new ground-breaking research published today,  shows smart use of these renewable fertilisers can increase yields and reduce bills with no negative impact on crop quality or safety. The programme of field experiments,  ...

  • Herbicide reduction can preserve crop yields as well as biodiversity benefits of weeds

    Pesticide-sparing approaches to farming do not have to compromise on crop yields, new research suggests. A study that explored the impact of reduced herbicide use across a variety of different farming contexts found that herbicideefficient systems could be just as productive as conventional systems — and more so than organic systems — whilst having other important environmental ...

  • Weather extremes slash cereal yields

    Climate change may have already begun to take its toll of agriculture. New research suggests that drought and extreme heat in the last 50 years have reduced cereal production by up to 10%. And, for once, developed nations may have sustained greater losses than developing nations. Researchers have been warning for years that ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Wild Bee Decline Threatens U.S. Crop Production

    The first national study to map U.S. wild bees suggests they’re disappearing in many of the country’s most important farmlands — including California’s Central Valley, the Midwest’s corn belt and the Mississippi River valley. If losses of these crucial pollinators continue, the new nationwide assessment indicates that farmers will face increasing costs — and ...


    By University of Vermont

  • New method may help detect avocado pathogen earlier

    University of Florida researchers have found an algorithm to help them detect laurel wilt, the deadly pathogen that threatens Florida’s $100 million-a-year avocado industry. Reza Ehsani, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering, said the algorithm finds laurel wilt-infected avocado trees before symptoms are visible to the naked eye. About 500 growers produce ...

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