Grain Monitoring Articles

  • Operational manifestations of institutional dysfunction in post-apartheid South Africa

    At the centre of the water law reform process initiated by the first democratic government of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) lay the challenge of transforming away from apartheid water injustices. Reform culminated in the promulgation of new legislation, regarded internationally as ambitious and forward-thinking legislation reflective of the broad aims of integrated water resource ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Reactor for pigment production - case study

    Large shearing forces are required for the production of certain pigments in order to achieve high colour intensity. For this reason, such pigments are normally produced with the help of kneading /disc dryers, which inevitably provide shearing forces due to their inherent design. The material and the time and energy required for their design makes these devices extremely expensive, especially ...


    By AVA - Huep GmbH u. Co. KG

  • Poor quality soil can lead to harmful impact: Stop erosion now

    Soil erosion is known as the wearing away of topsoil, leading to poor quality soil that is less conducive for plant and vegetation growth. In our series of blog posts focusing on erosion control, today we take a look at the harmful effects of soil erosion, and how they cause concerns not only to the environment, but also to human health and the economy as a whole. Poor Quality Soil ...


    By CoirGreen

  • Robust method for estimating grain yield in western Kenya during the growing seasons

    Uncertainties caused by climate change and population explosion require suitable methods for estimating grain yield during the growing seasons. This paper evaluates the applicability of the AquaCrop model in the region of western Kenya. The objectives of the study were to: simulate the long-term maize crop yields for the region using AquaCrop model for variable climate scenarios, and estimate ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Can grains of the past help us weather storms of the future?

    Combining science with traditional knowledge, researchers turn to ancient rice as a source of climate resilience In May 2009, Cyclone Aila wreaked havoc in eastern India. Clocking in at speeds of over 120 kilometers per hour, Aila hit the ...


    By Ensia

  • The effects of Picea schrenkiana forest litter on snow surface albedo

    In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of the snow albedo of different underlying surfaces based on measurements of shortwave radiation and observations of forest litter on snow surfaces, both in an open, unforested environment and in areas with differing forest canopy openness. The fractional litter coverage was obtained through the binarization of digital photos of forest litter ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Dissipation and residues of trifloxystrobin and its metabolite in rice under field conditions

    Residue analysis of trifloxystrobin and its metabolite (CGA 321113) in rice matrices, paddy water, and soil was developed using the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) method and high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC‐MS/MS). The method was used to evaluate the dissipation rate of trifloxystrobin and CGA 321113 in rice seedling, soil, and ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Can the World Feed China?

    By Lester R. Brown Overnight, China has become a leading world grain importer, set to buy a staggering 22 million tons in the 2013–14 trade year, according to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture projections. As recently as 2006—just eight years ago—China had a grain surplus and was exporting 10 million tons. What caused this dramatic shift? It wasn’t until 20 years ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • U.S.-India: Dealing With Monsoon Failure

    The scene plays out in India. At a reception, I met the head of Indian operations for Esso (now ExxonMobil). When I asked him how business was, he said it was great. In particular, diesel sales to fuel irrigation pumps were nearly double the previous year’s level. Why? Because farmers were pumping continuously to try to save their crops. Soon after, I met an embassy staff person, an avid ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Boost grain preservation before production

    Better grain storage would save money and feed over a billion, says Digvir S. Jayas. It deserves more attention. Annually over 2.6 billion tonnes of grains — cereals, oilseeds and pulses — are grown and then stored along the chain from producers to consumers. Most countries do not systematically report how much grain becomes unfit for human consumption during storage, but ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • The Difficulty of Defining Adaptation Finance

    While working on tracking adaptation finance for our Adaptation Finance Accountability Initiative project, we often get the question “What is adaptation finance?” or “What counts as adaptation finance?” To our embarrassment, we ...

  • Evaluation of the AquaCrop model for simulating yield response of winter wheat to water on the southern Loess Plateau of China

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the FAO-AquaCrop model in winter wheat in the southern Loess Plateau of China. Multi-year field experimental data from 2004 and 2011 were used to calibrate and validate the model for simulating biomass, canopy cover (CC), soil water content, and grain yield under rainfed conditions. The model performance was evaluated using root mean ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Rising Temperature, Rising Food Prices

    Agriculture as it exists today developed over 11,000 years of rather remarkable climate stability. It has evolved to maximize production within that climate system. Now, suddenly, the climate is changing. With each passing year, the agricultural system is becoming more out of sync with the climate system. In generations past, when there was an extreme weather event, such as a monsoon failure in ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Grain Yields Starting to Plateau

    By Lester R. Brown From the beginning of agriculture until the mid-twentieth century, growth in the world grain harvest came almost entirely from expanding the cultivated area. Rises in land productivity were too slow to be visible within a single generation. It is only within the last 60 years or so that rising yields have replaced area expansion as the principal source of growth in world grain ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • MULTIHOP RADIO WITH BUILT IN I/O CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO SENSORS AND PROBES

    MULTIHOP RADIO WITH BUILT IN I/O CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO SENSORS AND PROBES DX80DR radios from Banner Engineering reduce need for ancillary equipment at remote monitoring or control sites The data radio from Banner Engineering combines wireless transceiver, power supply and I/O circuits in one compact housing. The DX80DR MultiHop Radio connects sensors directly to the network, eliminating need for ...


    By Banner Engineering Corp.

  • New Era of Food Scarcity Echoes Collapsed Civilizations

    The world is in transition from an era of food abundance to one of scarcity. Over the last decade, world grain reserves have fallen by one third. World food prices have more than doubled, triggering a worldwide land rush and ushering in a new geopolitics of food. Food is the new oil. Land is the new gold. This new era is one of rising food prices and spreading hunger. On the demand side of the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Global Grain Stocks Drop Dangerously Low as 2012 Consumption Exceeded Production

    The world produced 2,241 million tons of grain in 2012, down 75 million tons or 3 percent from the 2011 record harvest. The drop was largely because of droughts that devastated several major crops—namely corn in the United States (the world’s largest crop) and wheat in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Australia. Each of these countries also is an important exporter. Global grain ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Threshold velocity of pollination in urban area of the city of Brno

    Wind velocity directly influences pollen release rate from mother plants and subsequently, the transport of pollen grains. The threshold velocity of pollination is defined as the lowest wind velocity with evidence of pollen concentration above the threshold pollen concentration. Only a limited number of published papers deal with the relationship between wind velocity and pollen concentration. ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Nanoscience to nanotechnology to manufacturing transition

    The primary focus of this review is on the transition of nanoscience to nanotechnology to manufacturing, specifically related to nanostructuring of materials for next–generation systems having superior performance. We start with the discussion of intrinsic advantages of nanoscale materials and systematic approach for transition into systems. As the feature (grain) size of solid–state materials ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Different methods for stabilisation of sand dunes using calcium bentonite

    Sand dunes movement in the Arabian arid area hinder land development, expansion of city limits, and diversely affects rural roads, farms, irrigation, and grazing. Early attempts to curb sand movement used agriculture schemes required continuous supply of water; chemical treatment poses environmental concerns. Studies were conducted for sand dune fixation using agricultural and chemical means, but ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

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