Plant Pathogen Detection News

  • Newly Revised Ohio Agronomy Guide for Sale

    A lot can change in 12 years. That’s why the 2005 edition of the Ohio Agronomy Guide was just revised to offer the most up-to-date guidelines for planting corn, soybeans, wheat and forages in Ohio, managing the pests they attract and enriching the soil in which they grow. All the guidelines offered in the book are specific to Ohio and based on research in Ohio fields. If a farmer, ...


    By Ohio State University

  • AgBiome Granted Multi-year Award to Discover Biological Solutions to Diseases Affecting Subsistence Crops of Sub-Saharan Africa

    The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has awarded AgBiome a new multi-year grant, entitled “Broad-Spectrum Biological Control of Fungal Diseases,” which will fund the evaluation and development of lead, proprietary biological fungicides in the fields of African smallholder farmers. The aim of the project is to identify and validate biological fungicides to control one or more of ...


    By AgBiome, Inc.

  • International seminar on Xylella fastidiosa

    The International Olive Council (IOC) and the International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM), under the Memorandum of Understanding signed in July 2016, have organised a seminar on Xylella fastidiosa¸ the bacterium which, since 2013, has been causing the death of hundreds of olive trees in the Italian region of Apulia, raising grave concerns among all olive ...

  • New test can detect plant viruses faster, cheaper

    A new test could save time and money diagnosing plant viruses, some of which can destroy millions of dollars in crops each year in Florida, says a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher. In a newly published study, Jane Polston, a UF/IFAS plant pathology professor, examined several ways to detect the DNA genome of begomoviruses. These viruses have emerged ...

  • Ambrosia beetle spreads dangerous avocado pathogen

    As the laurel wilt pathogen casts a cloud over the $100-million-a-year Florida avocado industry, University of Florida researchers continue to look for clues to prevent the pathogen from spreading. The main culprit has been the redbay ambrosia beetle, which has infected millions of native redbay and swampbay trees with the laurel wilt pathogen, but it is rarely seen in commercial avocado ...


    By University of Florida

  • Biopesticides Becoming More Than Just a Niche Product

    Growers are all too familiar with the vicious cycle of pests that develop a genetic resistance to chemical applications. As soon as researchers and growers find a chemical that works, genetic systems adapt and the pests find a way to survive. Then the costly cycle starts all over again. The solution to ending this cycle lies in the use of biopesticides as part of an Integrated Pest Management ...

  • Ohio State Expert: Cold Snap Could Injure Wheat Depending on Its Growth Stage

    Thanks to last month’s warmer-than-normal temperatures that sped up the growth of wheat crops across Ohio, this week’s cold snap could result in injury for some of those plants. Just how damaging the colder weather will be depends on how advanced the wheat is in its growth stage, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension. ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Cucumber virus quarantine to be lifted for NT growers in 2016

    AUSVEG has welcomed this afternoon’s announcement from the Northern Territory Department of Primary Industries that property quarantine for Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) will be lifted next year.   “It is welcome news for growers that property quarantine put in place in the Northern Territory following the outbreak of CGMMV will be ...


    By AUSVEG

  • New method may help detect avocado pathogen earlier

    University of Florida researchers have found an algorithm to help them detect laurel wilt, the deadly pathogen that threatens Florida’s $100 million-a-year avocado industry. Reza Ehsani, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering, said the algorithm finds laurel wilt-infected avocado trees before symptoms are visible to the naked eye. About 500 growers produce ...

  • Plant Science Innovations Heralded as Key Contributor to Combating Hunger & Food Insecurity in Asia

    As Asia and the world marked World Food Day on this date, CropLife Asia took the opportunity to herald the contributions farmers enabled by plant science technology are making to combat hunger around the globe - and highlight the important role these agricultural innovations will play in delivering food security and sustainability to the nations of Asia and the world. According to data from the ...


    By Japan Corporate News - JCN

  • Some plants are more sensitive to herbicides during reproductive stages of life cycle

    This study assessed the effects of herbicides on non-target plants in Denmark and Canada. The findings showed that some plants are more sensitive to herbicides in the reproductive stages of their life cycle and can experience delays in flowering and reduced seed production. The authors say future ecological assessments should consider reproductive outcomes. Herbicides are some of the most widely ...

  • Xylella bacteria increasingly affecting olive trees in Southern Europe

    EU-wide emergency measures came into force on 19 May to deal with the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, the cause of a devastating disease in various plants including olive trees in Italy. Xylella fastidiosa is a quarantine organism in the EU. There are no pesticides for combating this bacterial disease, so reliable detection and diagnostic methods are essential for preventing the spread of the ...

  • Olive trees: MEPs to demand answers on how to tackle spread of killer bacteria

    Parliament will quiz the Commission Thursday morning on plans to tackle the outbreak of Xylella fastidiosa bacteria, which have infected several thousand hectares of olive plantations in Italy, and prevent it spreading to other EU regions. The Commission will also be asked to respond to the question on how they will compensate any growers whose trees have to be destroyed. MEPs also ...


    By European Parliament

  • Controlling resilient plant viruses with steam

    Combining steam with heat-producing chemicals could control pathogenic viruses in soil, finds new research. The study examined how effective different forms of heat sterilisation of soil were at inactivating three plant viruses. While steam alone was enough to eradicate two of the viruses, the highly resilient tobacco mosaic virus required the addition of exothermic chemicals to reduce it by 97%. ...

  • Ohio Poultry Owners Advised to Increase Biosecurity as Virus Spreads in Western U.S.

    Three worrisome strains of avian flu have been detected in birds out West. These viruses can cause serious disease in birds, and their appearance has prompted poultry veterinarians at The Ohio State University to recommend that Ohio’s commercial producers and backyard chicken enthusiasts alike take precautions to protect their flocks. The strains are related to a virus ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Testing new biological plant protection products for effectiveness and practical feasibility

    A naturally occurring fungus codenamed ‘H39’ might be the long-sought biological defence against the dreaded apple scab. “This fungus has not only been tested for its ability to fight the pathogen. The new Select BioControl method was also used to immediately assess the practical feasibility of deploying it as a commercial product,” says Dr Jürgen Köhl of ...

  • Early protection, fungicide effectively reduce downy mildew in basil

    Sweet basil, a consumer favorite culinary herb, has a tough adversary. Downy mildew caused by the fungus Peronospora belbahrii has become the most devastating disease of basil plants grown in the United States. Discovered in Uganda in 1933, the first outbreak of downy mildew in the U.S. occurred in Florida in 2007. The disease has since spread to more than 30 states in the U.S., making many ...

  • H.I.S. Reports Results for the Full Year Ended October 2014

    Achieves record results for the fourth consecutive year Tokyo, Dec 5, 2014 - (JCN Newswire) - H.I.S. Co., Ltd. (TSE1: 9603), a leading travel and airline ticket agency, has announced results for the full year ended October 31, 2014. The Group achieved record results for the fourth consecutive year with consolidated net sales of 523,246 million yen, an increase of 9.1% ...


    By Japan Corporate News - JCN

  • Florendovirus: new genus of virus in plant genomes

    While the extent and importance of endogenous viral elements have been thoroughly researched in animals, there is a dearth of knowledge when it comes to plants. Within the framework of a broader international effort, researchers at INRA Versailles-Grignon and Cirad have described a new genus of the Caulimoviridae family of viruses, called Florendovirus, whose members have colonised the genomes of ...

  • EPA Awards Research Fellowship Grant to Student at the University of Georgia

    Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that Adelumola Oladeinde, PhD at the University of Georgia is one of 105 graduate students across the nation to receive $8.6 million in Science to Achieve Results (STAR) fellowship grants. The grants will be used to conduct research on topics ranging from climate change to public health to water quality, chemical safety and ...

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