Aquatic Livestock News

  • Love a lush, green lawn?

    A lush green lawn is lovely to look at, but too much of a good thing can be bad. Often, that beautiful lawn is the result of regular fertilizing. An abundance of nitrogen and other nutrients in natural waterways can cause trouble for aquatic plant and animal life. High levels of nitrogen and phosphorus can cause an overgrowth of algae in the water, which then blocks light from getting to native ...


    By Eco Partners, Inc.

  • UN Conference on Small Island Developing States opens in Samoa

    A renewed political commitment to tackle the many unique, sustainable development challenges facing the world's small island states, is expected to be the most important outcome of a United Nations conference that opened in Samoa today. The Third International Conference on Small Developing States (SIDS) from 1-4 September in Apia, Samoa also seeks to build partnerships aimed at addressing issues ...

  • Environmental concentrations of antibiotics are potentially damaging to aquatic life

    Combinations of antibiotics have been found in high enough concentrations to pose a serious threat to aquatic ecosystems, in a recent Spanish study. Antibiotics can have toxic effects on the bacteria and algae that form the basis of aquatic ecosystems. Antibiotics are in widespread use, not only for human medical conditions, but also for increasing growth rates in livestock, in the feed ...

  • EPA Settles Lawsuit Against North Georgia Landowner for Violations of the Clean Water Act

    The Duvall Development Co., Inc., Duvall & Son Livestock, Inc. and the president of both companies, Jeffrey H. Duvall, will pay a $30,000 penalty and have purchased five acres of forested land that was donated to the Chattahoochee National Forest in order to resolve federal Clean Water Act (CWA) violations. “This enforcement action sends a strong message about the importance of ...

  • Urban impacts on phosphorus in streams

    Although phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all life forms, essential amounts of the chemical element can cause water quality problems in rivers, lakes, and coastal zones. High concentrations of phosphorus in aquatic ecosystems are often associated with human activities in the surrounding area, such as agriculture and urban development. However, relationships between specific human ...

  • Elam Construction, 4B land and livestock ordered to mitigate damage to Yampa River (Colo.) wetlands (CO)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a compliance order to Elam Construction and 4B Land & Livestock, LLC (owned by Scott and Sheila Brennise) for impacts to wetlands at a gravel mining site adjacent to the Yampa River near Craig, Colo. Elam Construction’s and 4B Land and Livestock’s actions were conducted without a required Clean Water Act permit from the ...

  • Tracking phosphorus runoff from livestock manure

    Nutrient runoff from livestock manure is a common source of agricultural pollution. Looking for an uncommon solution, a team of scientists has developed an application of rare earth elements to control and track runoff phosphorus from soils receiving livestock manure. In addition to reducing the solubility of phosphorus, this method shows particular promise for researchers interested in tracking ...

  • Weeding out of water invaders

    Defra and the Scottish Government today (Wednesday 24 February) called on Britain’s gardeners to help stop the spread of invasive aquatic plants that damage the natural environment and cost the economy millions with a new campaign to highlight the plight of Britain’s waterways. The Be Plant Wise campaign highlights five of the worst offenders currently wreaking havoc on our wildlife and ...


  • Challenges growing for food security

    Despite international efforts to reduce global food insecurity and malnutrition, the realisation of food security in the world has fallen short of promises made at the World Food Summit in 1996, and the Millennium Development Goals'2 target to halve world hunger by 2015 is also unlikely to be met. In a recently released report, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and ...

  • Dust in the western US five times what it was 200 years ago

    The Western United States has become 500 percent dustier in the past two centuries due to westward expansion and accompanying human activity beginning in the 1800s, according to a new study by scientists at four U.S. universities and two federal government agencies. Sediment records from dust blown into alpine lakes in southwest Colorado's San Juan Mountains over thousands of years indicates ...

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