John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Air‐plant exchange of brominated flame retardants at a rural site: Influencing factor, interspecies difference, and forest scavenging

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Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in eucalyptus leaves and pine needles from a rural site in southern China were measured to investigate the air‐plant exchange. The mean concentrations of BFRs were higher in pine needles (79.8 ng/g dry weight) than in eucalyptus leaves (74.5 ng/g), whereas an inverse result were found for the leaf surface particles (LSPs), with mean concentrations of 3490 and 5718 ng/g, respectively. For most of the BFRs, the correlations between their concentrations in plants and those in the vapor phase, atmospheric particles, LSPs, and the environmental variables (temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity) at this site were in contrast to the results we observed at an e‐waste site previously, indicating ambient air level plays a vital role in the relationships. The interspecies difference in the BFR profiles and the correlations above implied that pine needles likely have more advantages for uptake of BFRs from gaseous deposition than eucalyptus leaves, for which particle‐bound deposition is more important. Like the e‐waste site, the leaf scavenging ratios of BFRs were also controlled by their octanol/air partition coefficient (KOA). It was estimated that approximately 154 kg of BFRs in the atmosphere are scavenged annually by forest in this region, which was 1.7 times larger than that via atmospheric deposition to non‐forests ground. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. © 2013 SETAC

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