John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Effects of bisphenol a on mineral nutrition in soybean seedling roots

0
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous chemical in the environment and is potentially harmful to plants. However, relevant studies on the effects of BPA on plants are relatively scarce. In the present work, the effects of BPA on the biomass (fresh and dry weight), absorptive function (activity and absorptive area), and mineral element levels in soybean (Glycine max L.) seedling roots treated with 1.5 mg L‐1, 3.0 mg L‐1, 6.0 mg L‐1, 12.0 mg L‐1, 24.0 mg L‐1, 48.0 mg L‐1, and 96.0 mg L‐1 BPA were investigated. Treatment with 1.5 mg L‐1 BPA increased the levels of nitrate and other mineral elements (P, K, Mg, Mn, Zn, and Mo) in the roots, whereas treatments with BPA at higher concentrations decreased the levels of these elements in the roots. All treatments with BPA caused increases in the levels of ammonium, Ca, Fe, and Cu in the roots. Moreover, treatment with 1.5 mg L‐1 BPA increased the fresh weight, dry weight, activity and absorptive area of the roots, whereas treatments with BPA at higher concentrations decreased these indices in a dose‐dependent manner. Furthermore, correlation analysis data showed that BPA affected the levels of mineral elements and absorptive function of soybean seedling roots, which may be the physiological basis of BPA action on plants. Environ Toxicol Chem © 2014 SETAC

Customer comments

No comments were found for Effects of bisphenol a on mineral nutrition in soybean seedling roots. Be the first to comment!