agricultural equipment market Articles

  • Windrow Turner Equipment Review

    Untitled Document IN TODAY'S modern composting world, there is “windrow composting,” ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Distorted agricultural prices cause hunger and resources dilapidation

    The main objective of this paper is to present facts and arguments trying to prove that price distortion has been the main reason for the dilapidation of human and physical resources all over the world. In some countries, farmers sell their products at prices below their real cost. In these countries, most often, family labour and equipment depreciation are not accounted as real costs. The ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • The 1996 “Freedom to Farm” Farm Bill

    The period of U.S. farm bills where the instruments were designed around compensation policies that used price support/supply management programs allowing farmers to remain in production during long periods of low prices—the result of four centuries of publicly-sponsored developmental policies—ended with the adoption of the 1996 Farm Bill. In some important ways, the demise of price ...


    By National Farmers Union (NFU)

  • Massey Ferguson launches Kenya ‘people’s tractor’

    AGCO brand Massey Ferguson has announced the launch of a new tractor for the Kenyan market The MF 35, with its 36 horse power (hp) engine, 6-forward/2-reverse speed mechanical gearbox and hard-wearing robust construction, will bring farm mechanisation within the reach of many agricultural enterprises for the first time, the company said. “Straightforward, dependable and affordable, the 36 ...


    By TractorExport

  • Changing the face of poultry farming across China - Case Study

    Supporting the modernisation of China's agriculture Anhui, China China is the largest egg producer in the world, amounting to over 35% of global production. Cargill has devised a world class strategy to modernise agriculture and food safety in China. Background China’s poultry industry has grown at an average annual rate of 8.8% ...

  • Editorial: The Business Case

    How do organics recyclers measure success? That is one question we are exploring in preparation for the Opening Plenary — The Business Case For Organics Recycling — at BioCycle EAST COAST17, April 4-7, 2017 in Ellicott City, Maryland, just outside Baltimore. We know many successful organics recyclers, that is if success is defined by factors such as longevity, market leadership, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • California company closes the composting loop

    BEFORE we made our first ton of compost, we had already talked to farmers to determine what they needed in a soil amendment,” says Roger Van Der Wende, Vice President, Supermarket Division, Community Recycling & Resource Recovery, Inc. (Community) in Sun Valley, California. Considering the fastidious navigation the company has done to advance in a previously uncharted realm of resource ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Roundup - March 2018

    Sacramento, California: Alternative Manure Management Project Grants The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) awarded $9.64 million in grant funding to 17 alternative manure management projects across the state. These projects, part of the Alternative Manure Management Program, or AMMP, will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on California dairy farms and livestock ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Lindsay Irrigation advances Watertronics AG Pump Stations case Study

    When AJ Ochoa, a fourth generation Othello, Wash. farmer pushed one button to start his new Watertronics® agricultural pump station, he became one of the first irrigators in the world to reap the benefits of a fully integrated pump and center pivot water control package. Even more important to Ochoa, he began realizing immediate and substantial reductions in energy, water and labor costs. ...


    By Lindsay Corporation

  • Food Residuals Composting in the U.S.

    For many years, the public sector has been at the forefront of the developing composting industry. For example, when biosolids composting first got started, it was the sanitation departments of municipalities and local sanitary authorities pushing projects. With yard trimmings composting, municipalities and counties were the primary entities developing programs. Even the fledgling steps of solid ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Financing an anaerobic digester

    LENDERS are generally well disposed to projects that diversify revenues while lowering costs and mitigating risks. Add a ready source of equity and you are well on the way toward financing a project that is a win-win proposition for the lender and the project developer. Such is the case with the anaerobic digester project at Geerlings Hillside Farm (GHF). The Geerlings's 8,000-head hog farm is ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Hurricane Clean Up for City of St. Petersburg

    Untitled Document THE city of St. Petersburg, Florida, after dodging Hurricane Charley's direct hit, received fringe winds from Hurricanes ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Dutch Farmers Find It Pays To Manage Poultry Manure

    Poultry farmers in Holland face challenges similar to their North American counterparts in dealing with manure from concentrated operations where there is insufficient cropland for application. This creates a need for exporting manure from the producing farm to users in other places. Poultry operations in Holland differ from most North American poultry farms in that most are not vertically ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Farmers fine-tune research, spread their own innovations

    Smallholder farmers can aid the uptake of research fruits and drive grassroots innovations. Joel Winston reports. The 1960s' Green Revolution demonstrated how technological innovations can transform agriculture. High-yielding crop strains, irrigation, fertilisers and pesticides were brought into developing countries, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Zimbabwe`s New Farmers Fail to Deliver

    HARARE, Zimbabwe, (ENS) - Six years after President Robert Mugabe sanctioned violent invasions of Zimbabwe's commercial farmland - mostly but not entirely white owned - by landless peasants, the facts show that the so-called new farmers have failed dramatically to produce crops to feed their countrymen. The poor peasants who led the invasions, at the behest of Mugabe, have ...

  • Basic Information of Rice Production Line

    The objective of a rice milling system is to remove the husk and the bran layers from paddy rice to produce whole white rice kernels that are sufficiently milled, free of impurities and contain a minimum number of broken kernels. The milling yield and quality of rice is dependent on the quality of the paddy, the milling equipment used and the skill of the mill operator. With the rapid ...

  • Soy Cultivation in South America

    The expansion of soy bean Soy cultivation has shown an increasing expansion throughout Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay, in the last decade. This remarkable increase is explained by its economical importance in the region, and as a consequence, it is difficult to regulate its progress and attenuate its potential socio-environmental impacts. In 2012, in these 4 countries the ...


    By Wetlands International

  • How innovation is flourishing at the grassroots

    SciDev.Net reporters across the developing world describe exciting initiatives aimed at supporting innovation in local communities and remote areas. From small-scale hydro-powered electricity in Malaysia to cost-saving solar pumps in Pakistan, communities across the developing world are ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Waste not in Asheville

    Asheville, North Carolina, has gained a national reputation as a hub of local and artisanal foods. In fact, the local foods movement in this Southern Appalachian city has become so embedded in the community consciousness that the city has dubbed itself “the world’s first Foodtopian Society.” There are hundreds of unique restaurants, dozens of bakeries, breweries and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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