agricultural soil protection Articles

  • Introduction of composted digestates in agriculture

    Municipal organic waste is increasingly recycled by aerobic composting or anaerobic digestion procedures. In 1997, 230 000 Mg organic waste were composted and used for agriculture in the region of Cologne, which is an increase by 70% compared to 1994 (Anonymous, 1999). Therefore, the effects of compost on the soil and the plants require studies on:- its nutrient contents to contribute to the ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • Soil organic matter content effects on dermal pesticide bioconcentration in American toads (Bufo americanus)

    Pesticides have been implicated as a major factor in global amphibian declines and may pose great risk to terrestrial phase amphibians moving to and from breeding ponds on agricultural landscapes. Dermal uptake from soil is known to occur in amphibians, but predicting pesticide availability and bioconcentration across soil types is not well understood. This study was designed to compare uptake ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Climate and Economic Benefits of Agroforestry Systems

    Introduction Agriculture is well known as a significant contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, but emerging practices in land management have the potential to curtail these emissions and reverse much of the ecological and climate harm caused by overly intensive systems. One such practice, cultivation and conservation of trees in agricultural practices, or agroforestry, is an important ...


    By Climate Institute

  • Drought and flooding rains

    Walter Jehne, former CSIRO Climate Scientist and Microbiologist, founder of Healthy Soils Australia, has written a 3-part document on drought in Australia and in it he demonstrates many scientific facts about how we should be managing our soils. There are many fascinating revelations in his scientific analysis such as how the removal of vegetation affects rainfall or how the lowering of soil ...

  • Protecting and restoring forests

    Protecting the earth’s nearly 4 billion hectares of remaining forests and replanting those already lost are both essential for restoring the earth’s health, an important foundation for the new economy. Reducing rainfall runoff and the associated flooding and soil erosion, recycling rainfall inland, and restoring aquifer recharge depend on simultaneously reducing pressure on forests and on ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Monitoring of soil fertility

    Background In agriculture and forestry soil fertility is a decisive factor for the economic use of fields and forests. Various factors, considered as a whole are the indicators which characterize the soil fertility. Important parameters are e.g.: Intensity of precipitation, air temperature, air humidity, soil humidity, suction power and soil temperature in various depths. ...


    By OTT HydroMet

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Assessment of Trace‐Element Impacts on Agricultural Use of Water from the Dan River following the Eden Coal Ash Release

    Catastrophic events require rapid, scientifically sound decision‐making to mitigate impacts on human welfareandthe environment. The objective of this study was to analyze potential impacts of coal‐ash‐derived trace elements on agriculture following a 35,000‐tonne release of coal ash into the Dan River at the Duke Energy Steam Station in Eden, NC. We performed scenario calculations to assess ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Clothianidin in agricultural soils and uptake into corn pollen and canola nectar after multi‐year seed treatment applications

    Limited data are available on the fate of clothianidin under realistic agricultural production conditions. This is the first large‐scale assessment of clothianidin residues in soil and bee‐relevant matrices from corn and canola fields after multiple years of seed‐treatment use. The average soil concentration from 50 Midwest US corn fields with 2 to 11 years of planting clothianidin‐treated ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Feeding the world from organics

    Washington State University researchers have concluded that feeding a growing global population with sustainability goals in mind is possible. Their review of hundreds of published studies provides evidence that organic farming can produce sufficient yields, be profitable for farmers, protect and improve the environment and be safer for farm workers. The review study, “Organic Agriculture ...

  • Determining phosphorus and sediment release rates from five irish tillage soils

    Received for publication December 11, 2008. The aim of this study was to compare the nutrient and sediment releases from five Irish tillage soils, inclined at 10- and 15-degree slopes, under a simulated rainfall intensity of 30mmh–1 in a controlled laboratory study. Using the relationship between soil test phosphorus (STP) in the five soils and the dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) released in ...

  • Sustainable Soil Health

    “A Nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt. We have learned some harsh lessons about how to treat our soil. While most of us are aware of the problems of the past, some agricultural operations in the world are not heeding those lessons. We all know that healthy soil is essential to feed the ever-increasing ...

  • “Soil Health” And Compost

    In my quest to better understand how compost improves the chemical, physical and biological attributes of soil, I came across a training course created by the Rodale Institute, with support from the Northeast Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program called “An Introduction to Soil Health.” The course emphasized that if we can improve the overall quality of ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • Let’s stop treating our soil like dirt

    One of the most underappreciated resources on our planet, soil does much more than grow crops The United Nations’ International Year of Soils is hardly a media darling. Maybe it’s because many people are like me, who recall Mom’s words: “Take off your shoes! Don’t bring dirt ...


    By Ensia

  • Development of Waste Sawdust as a plant protection material for horticulture and agriculture

    Untitled Document Lignin is one of the major wastes of modern society, in the form of wood waste such as sawdust. In nature, lignin is ...

  • Losing Soil

    In 1938, Walter Lowdermilk, a senior official in the Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, traveled abroad to look at lands that had been cultivated for thousands of years, seeking to learn how these older civilizations had coped with soil erosion. He found that some had managed their land well, maintaining its fertility over long stretches of history, and were ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Soil and water: towards a larger-scale perspective of their relations

    Land use changes over time have altered relations between soils and water cycles throughout Europe. There are regions where forests were cut for agriculture or herding, or for industrial, mining, and/or railroad use. Soils were lost, through mud floods, and the water cycles changed so that their present status is one of badlands and/or desert-like areas. Early stages in the path to degradation ...

  • Irrigation challenges in the sub-humid US Mid-South

    Irrigated area in the Mid-South USA continues to increase and now totals four million ha. Because of low available water holding capacities and shallow root-limiting layers in many soils, irrigation management is difficult. Water quality and water use efficiency impacts under irrigation are poorly understood, but comprehension is necessary if conversion from groundwater to surface water supplies ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

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