agricultural water screen Articles

  • Biotechnology for Environmentally Safe Agriculture

    Issue: In Europe some uses of biotechnology are meeting vocal opposition from certain quarters. Nevertheless, the vast amount of knowledge acquired recently in biology can be used to develop and apply biotechnology for an environmentally safe agriculture. Public acceptance and a new policy impetus can serve to promote the introduction of safe and competitive agricultural technologies that have a ...

  • Increased inbreeding and inter-species gene flow in remnant populations of the rare Eucalyptus benthamii

    Eucalyptus benthamii Maiden & Cambage is a forest tree of interest for conservation and plantation forestry. It is vulnerable to extinction, occurring on the alluvial floodplains of the Nepean River and its tributaries, south-west of Sydney, Australia. These floodplains were largely cleared of native vegetation for agriculture by the mid-1800s. Flooding of the Cox Valley for Sydneys water supply ...


    By Springer

  • Composting Roundup - March 2018

    Sacramento, California: Alternative Manure Management Project Grants The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) awarded $9.64 million in grant funding to 17 alternative manure management projects across the state. These projects, part of the Alternative Manure Management Program, or AMMP, will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on California dairy farms and livestock ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting and local food merge st urban garden

    Growing Power (GP), a nonprofit urban garden and training center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, provides affordable produce to neighborhoods without access to fresh food, and processes a variety of organic wastes through composting and anaerobic digestion. Located on a two-acre lot on Milwaukee's north side, the six greenhouses and several hoop houses include raised beds for herbs and greens, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Poultry Farm Pioneers Low-Rate Composting

    Tony Pastore, Sr. started Park Farms in Canton, Ohio decades ago to process and market chickens. In 1989, it was decided that instead of buying chickens from other producers, a new venture would be launched to raise chickens directly for Park Farms. This led to the formation of A & J Farms, a 1,900-acre operation that contains 14 separately operating chicken farms. Each sub-farm has up to ten ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Worming the way to finished compost

    SCREENING AND GRINDING When materials from CR&R and other generators are unloaded, a preliminary screening separates out nonorganic contaminants.    Even though there are source separated programs in places like Temecula and Lake Elsinore, there is the occasional appearance of plastic and glass that needs to be sorted out. Next, Bodlak’s crews put materials through a Vermeer tub ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • College Composting Program Matures

    Untitled Document To meet the need for quality compost, Berea College now processes 35 tons of food residuals each year, providing jobs for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Implementing Research : Georgia Takes Many Routes to Recycle Food Residuals

     PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines and tanks — which go back to 1941 — ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Research Projects Add Value to MSW Composting Facility

    Untitled Document By combining upfront separation for recyclables with intensive composting of MSW and biosolids, Florida's Sumter County ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Pragmatic farm composters forge new path to resource recovery

    AG CHOICE is an on-farm composting operation located in the scenic countryside of Andover, New Jersey. On the drive to tour their site, it was astounding just how much of New Jersey, our most densely populated state, is still rural. Jay and Jill Fischer operate the two-year-old facility, which is one of a kind in New Jersey. Jay also owns and operates a sawmill in the area, and it was while ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Site Remediation Success

    Dorchester County, Maryland agreed to a remediation plan that involved composting the 140,000 tons of unprocessed feedstocks stored on site. An aggressive strategy has ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • Composting Livestock Mortalities

    Performance, composting methods, environmental impacts and biosecurity of the process are evaluated for emergency disposal of cattle by research team at Iowa State University. A THREE-YEAR study was commissioned by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to evaluate the practical feasibility, performance, environmental impacts and biosecurity of using composting for emergency disposal - should a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • A New Generation of GMOs

    Is synthetic biology on its way to our farms, markets and tables? Thousands of researchers will descend on Boston this fall for an event billed as the world’s largest gathering of synthetic biologists. The field is evolving so rapidly that even scientists working in it  ...


    By Ensia

  • Compost Users Forum: The Applied Thoughts Of A Compost Theorist

    WITHIN a 60-mile radius of my office here in central California, there are 1,000 dairies — each having an average of 2,000 cows. They generate over four million tons of manure annually, so we are pretty much in the manure business whether we want to be or not. Somebody has to manage this material and help the farmers utilize it properly, fulfilling its potential monetary value. That’s what we ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Preconsumer Collection : Composting Food Service Scraps at Resort

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Users Forum : Compost Research On Wisconsin Organic Farm

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • What’s Your “Big Mac”?

    Compost marketing entrepreneur grew a company that today uses over a million cubic yards of compost annually. Palletizable Filtrexx Soxx™ that did not slide when stacked on pallets allowed rapid advancement of palletization, which led to scale, which led to what Rod Tyler calls Filtrexx’s “Big Mac®.” Photo courtesy of Filtrexx International ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you