agriculture crop cleaning Articles

  • Crops flourish with Scalewatcher

    Water is an essential component of horticulture and agriculture whether it is used for irrigating field-scale vegetables, nursery stock, flowers or fruit.  Where water contains high degrees of calcium, magnesium and sodium, it can cause nutrient deficiency in plants and crops resulting in stunted growth and poor yields. Calcium also blocks irrigation systems and boilers in heated ...

  • Record Crops Predicted – Storing Chemicals in Suitable Vertical Storage Tanks

    The US is celebrating bumper crops this year, according to Farming UK. The publication states that the record-breaking corn harvest this year surpassed expectations of the US Department of Agriculture and it seems that because of the warm summer this year, that the UK could be following in its footsteps. Farming UK also reports on a trial that examines the good health ...


    By ENDURAMAXX Storage Tanks

  • Rotary batch blender mixes biological products that boost farm crops

    Agriculture has never been more challenging and fertility efficiency tools, such as inoculants, more important. Modern farmers rely on technology and production practices to significantly increase the yield of their food crops. Biological products like inoculants are a vital part of that strategy. Novozymes Biologicals is an industry leader in developing and manufacturing inoculants, which are a ...

  • The California rice cropping system: agronomic and natural resource issues for long-term sustainability

    California rice is produced on approximately 200,000 ha mostly in the Sacramento Valley. The crop is planted in April/May and harvested in September/October. The growing season is characterized by a Mediterranean climate with negligible rainfall, high solar radiation, and relatively cold nighttime temperatures, thus yields may exceed 9 t ha−1, 20% above the US average. California is a ...


    By Springer

  • Hurricane Clean Up for City of St. Petersburg

    Untitled Document THE city of St. Petersburg, Florida, after dodging Hurricane Charley's direct hit, received fringe winds from Hurricanes ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Briquetting of Biomass: How to Make Best Use of Waste?

    Do you know that proper management of waste from different kinds of agricultural operations can contribute in a significant way. You must have heard the saying ‘waste not want not’. It has been observed that proper management of waste from different kinds of agricultural operations can add up in a particular way. The waste management helps to create a healthy environment not for man ...


    By Jay Khodiyar Machine Tools

  • Sustainable Management of Large Scale Irrigation Systems: A Decision Support Model for Gediz Basin, Turkey

    While water on a global scale is plentiful, 97% of it is saline and 2.25% is trapped in glaciers and ice, leaving only 0.75% available in freshwater aquifers, rivers and lakes. About 70% of this fresh water is used for agricultural production, 22% for industrial purposes and 8% for domestic purposes. Increasing competition for water for domestic and industrial purposes is likely to reduce the ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Profitability maps as an input for site-specific management decision making

    For over a decade, farmers have been collecting site-specific yield data. Many have formed doubts about this investment because of their inability to directly apply this information as feedback for improving management. The objective of this case-study analysis was to investigate how site-specific decisions can be improved by transforming a long-term multiple-crop yield-map dataset into profit ...

  • How green was my Vertical Farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever.The problem is real and immediate. Even by most ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • What is the Future of Horticultural Science in Africa?

    Horticulture is a labour intensive sector that is important for human wellbeing: 'agriculture supplies protein, carbohydrates and staple crops - but we would have a pretty boring life without horticulture.' Nevertheless, in many countries, faculties of agriculture and their departments of horticulture have been swallowed by schools of life or earth sciences. As a result horticulture gets ...

  • Soil science gains voice in the US government

    The Soil Science Society of America’s (SSSA) Science Policy Office, started in 1986 and based in Washington, DC, educates United States (US) federal government policymakers about and advocates for soil and the soil sciences. As a result, US agricultural, natural resources and environmental legislation and corresponding federal rules and regulations are more scientifically sound and appropriately ...

  • Poultry Farm Pioneers Low-Rate Composting

    Tony Pastore, Sr. started Park Farms in Canton, Ohio decades ago to process and market chickens. In 1989, it was decided that instead of buying chickens from other producers, a new venture would be launched to raise chickens directly for Park Farms. This led to the formation of A & J Farms, a 1,900-acre operation that contains 14 separately operating chicken farms. Each sub-farm has up to ten ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Custom DELUMPER LP Reduces Wet, Sticky Agglomerates No Other Unit Could Handle - Case Study

    When a major global leader in agricultural products, needed help reducing wet and sticky agglomerates in a very tight plant location, Franklin Miller was ready with a custom solution. The customer produces phosphate, nitrogen, and potash, three ...


    By Franklin Miller Inc.

  • A Brief Analysis about the Straw Crusher

    The serious pollution of the air during the harvesttime let people realize the importance of rational utilization of straw. The straw crusher can crush the corn stalk, peanut shells and bean stalk etc, which are agricultural waste. By doing this can avoid the waste of the crop straw but also protect the environment and effectively develop the renewable energy. 1. The Working Principle of straw ...

  • College Composting Program Matures

    Untitled Document To meet the need for quality compost, Berea College now processes 35 tons of food residuals each year, providing jobs for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • Renewables Make Progress on Many Fronts: Grass Roots Ethanoll from Field Waste

    Progress in community digesters will bring fresh jobs and local control back to farm country - plus offering answers for global warming. FROM THE MIDWEST where native grasses, field waste and wood chips are fueling new biorefineries that are locally-owned to the Northwest where some 50 million gallons of raw manure are producing electricity and dried bedding, community digesters and on-farm ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The Latest in Whitefly Control

    Next month’s Greenhouse Canada Grower Day is welcoming leading researchers and crop specialists to help you tackle one of the industry’s biggest challenges. Whitefly is proving to be one of the most difficult pests to control, mainly due to the lack of effective registered chemicals that can eradicate silverleaf whitefly. It is also due to the unwillingness of biological suppliers to ...

  • Focus on Australia & New Zealand: Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand

     Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand An Emerging Industry Takes Shape To deal with the waste stream in Australia and New Zealand, all strategies refer to organics recycling as a “fundamental vehicle for reaching future waste reduction targets,” notes Edmund Horan of RMIT University in Melbourne. “Composting provides a mechanism, not only for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Brazil: Controlled Composting In Developing Countries

    For more than six years, pilot and large-scale composting experiments have been done at the University of Vicosa in Vicosa, Brazil. We focused on low cost technologies, forced aeration techniques, vector and leachate control, process monitoring, staff training, and technical assistance to farms and city councils. It seems that an unwritten law for solid waste management for developing countries ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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