agriculture cutting system Articles

  • Agricultural Residuals Drive Producer-Owned Energy

    Farmer-owned renewable energy enterprises are increasing rapidly — with alternative fuels such as biodiesel, ethanol and distiller’s grains becoming mainstream. MINNESOTA is home to 16 ethanol plants generating approximately 550 million gallons per year. Most of these new facilities are producer-owned. Many others are under construction or are in the planning process. In 2005, Minnesota farmers ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Climate Smart Agriculture: Zambia’s Strategy to Reduce Emissions

    The agricultural sector is believed to be the backbone of the Zambian economy thereby alleviating problems associated with poverty and food security. The development of the sector is viewed as one sustainable way of economic growth and ‘Eradicating Extreme Poverty and Hunger’ which is goal number one of the Millennium Development Goals (UN, 2000). The sector contributes to the growth ...


    By TractorExport

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

  • Terra Preta sanitation: re-discovered from an ancient Amazonian civilisation – integrating sanitation, bio-waste management and agriculture

    The recent discovery of the bio-waste and excreta treatment of a former civilisation in the Amazon reveals the possibility of a highly efficient and simple sanitation system. With the end product that was black soil they converted 10% of former infertile soil of the region: Terra Preta do Indio (black soil of the Indians). These soils are still very fertile 500 years after this civilisation had ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Contained Composting Systems Rewiew

    Having gained success in recycling yard trimmings, composters and recycling coordinators are reaching deeper into the organic residuals pile to capture other feedstocks. In particular, their sights are set on source separated food materials, from institutions (e.g. schools, hospitals), grocery stores and produce markets, food processors and commercial food service facilities (e.g. restaurants). A ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The water we eat

    Agriculture imposes a heavy and growing burden on Europe's water resources, threatening water shortages and damage to ecosystems. To achieve sustainable water use, farmers must be given the right price incentives, advice and assistance. Food is intrinsically bound to human wellbeing. Besides the importance of good food for good health and the pleasure we derive from eating, agricultural ...

  • Common pool resources and communal control: empirical evidence from Himachal Pradesh, India

    The Sirmour district, Himachal Pradesh, India, lies in the western Himalayan range. Mixed-farming is the main occupation in the mid-hills and basically consists of agriculture, livestock and forest produces. Hence, communal forests (mushtarka), common grazing lands (ghasnies) and gravity-flow irrigation systems (kuhl) were found to be the three major common pool resources in the villages of ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • A win for farmers and the environment

    Is it possible to reduce pesticide use without compromising crop yields? Yes — and then some, according to a new study published in the journal Insects. Researchers at the University of Essex in the United Kingdom measured pesticide use and crop yield at 85 project sites in 24 Asian and African countries practicing integrated pest management ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • The Business Case for REDD

    Deforestation and Degradation Around the world, forests are being destroyed at a rate of about thirteen million hectares a year and deforestation accounts for an estimated 17 – 20% of all global emissions. In addition, forests and other terrestrial carbon sinks play a vital role in preventing runaway climate change, soaking up a full 2.6 Gt of atmospheric carbon every year. The ...


    By The CarbonNeutral Company

  • How green was my Vertical Farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever.The problem is real and immediate. Even by most ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Learning from African Farmers: How “Re-greening” boosts food security; curbs climate change

    President Obama is in Africa this week to discuss development, investment, health, and, notably, food security. The trip comes on the heels of the ...

  • Soil and Water Benefits: Composting Reduces Fuel and Labor Costs on Family Farms

     Composting Reduces Fuel and Labor Costs on Family Farms Jeff and Pam Riesgraf — who manage a certified organic dairy and crop operation near Jordan, Minnesota — began composting manure from their dairy herd in 1993. They had two major objectives. First, they wanted to reduce weed seeds naturally present in manure. At the same time, they understood the need to protect water quality by ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Business Developments

    SAN FRANCISCO BUILDING RAISES BAR ON SUSTAINABILITY The design by KMD Architects for a new l2-story headquarters of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission will demonstrate energy efficiency, water recycling and reduced carbon footprint. “Our intent from the beginning was to create the most energy-efficient building,” says PUC manager Anthony Irons. The $178 million, 254,000-sq ft ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Growbags (Coco slabs)

    Keeping up with the latest grow techniques and products are probably becoming increasingly important for an ardent farmer or gardener in today’s rapidly changing world. Cultivating fast growing plants is becoming a priority especially if it is a method that is 100% natural. Designed and created to suit all requirements Coir Grow bag, also known as Coco slabs, is an easy, useful and ...


    By CoirGreen

  • Nutrient Management: Recycling Residuals Into Animal Feed

     Composting Reduces Fuel and Labor Costs on Family Farms Jeff and Pam Riesgraf — who manage a certified organic dairy and crop operation near Jordan, Minnesota — began composting manure from their dairy herd in 1993. They had two major objectives. First, they wanted to reduce weed seeds naturally present in manure. At the same time, they understood the need to protect water quality by ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Towards climate-responsible peatlands management

    Peatlands are lands with a naturally accumulated peat layer at their surface. They are found all over the world and come in many forms, display many different characteristics and are used in many different ways. Even though peatlands extend over a relatively small portion of the earth’s land surface, they hold a large pool of carbon. There is no universal definition of peatlands. For the ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Boost grain preservation before production

    Better grain storage would save money and feed over a billion, says Digvir S. Jayas. It deserves more attention. Annually over 2.6 billion tonnes of grains — cereals, oilseeds and pulses — are grown and then stored along the chain from producers to consumers. Most countries do not systematically report how much grain becomes unfit for human consumption during storage, but ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • When population growth and resource availability collide

    As land and water become scarce, competition for these vital resources intensifies within societies, particularly between the wealthy and those who are poor and dispossessed. The shrinkage of life-supporting resources per person that comes with population growth is threatening to drop the living standards of millions of people below the survival level, leading to potentially unmanageable social ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

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