agriculture microbial species Articles

  • Biotechnology for Environmentally Safe Agriculture

    Issue: In Europe some uses of biotechnology are meeting vocal opposition from certain quarters. Nevertheless, the vast amount of knowledge acquired recently in biology can be used to develop and apply biotechnology for an environmentally safe agriculture. Public acceptance and a new policy impetus can serve to promote the introduction of safe and competitive agricultural technologies that have a ...

  • Current research projects

    Phosphorus availability as influenced by organic residues in five calcareous soilsInvestigator: Mohsen Jalali, Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, IranObjectives: To investigate the effect of time and organic residue addition on P availability in some calcareous soils. The use of organic residue is appropriate in maintaining long-term ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • Compost Utilization goes Through the Roof

    Untitled Document Center for Green Roof Research at Penn State University uses compost in its media studies and plans to explore microbial communities. AT the Penn State ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The Latest in Whitefly Control

    Next month’s Greenhouse Canada Grower Day is welcoming leading researchers and crop specialists to help you tackle one of the industry’s biggest challenges. Whitefly is proving to be one of the most difficult pests to control, mainly due to the lack of effective registered chemicals that can eradicate silverleaf whitefly. It is also due to the unwillingness of biological suppliers to ...

  • Understanding Compost Tea

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Commercial Experiences :Time for (compost) Tea in the Northwest

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Arsenic in irrigated paddy soils

    Natural arsenic pollution of drinking water has been reported from over 70 countries world-wide, affecting an estimated 150 million people (Ravenscroft et. al., 2008). About 50 million of these people live in Bangladesh, 30 million in India and 33 million in six other countries of south and south-east Asia. It has recently been recognised that arsenic-contaminated groundwater used for irrigation ...

  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Purchasing: Using Specifications to Expand Markets

    As part of its market development initiatives for urban bulk procurement of organics, the California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB) focused on preparing model specifications to assist purchasing of both compost and mulch. The aim was not to provide a single “best” specification, but to offer a series of “illustrative draft specs,” varying according to end user requirements. In ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • A New Generation of GMOs

    Is synthetic biology on its way to our farms, markets and tables? Thousands of researchers will descend on Boston this fall for an event billed as the world’s largest gathering of synthetic biologists. The field is evolving so rapidly that even scientists working in it  ...


    By Ensia

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