agriculture microbiology Articles

  • Agriculture Plant Nursery - Case Study

    Challenge A plant nursery company had water quality issues from the well water source that there were using for irrigation purposes in their plant growing operations. These water quality issues including total dissolved salts (TDS) around 2500 mg/l, as well as turbidity, mineral hardness and microbiological contaminants. The plants were slow growing. ...

  • GWT Case Study - Agriculture Processing Sector

    Application Case Studies - Agriculture Plant Nursery Challenge A plant nursery company had water quality issues from the well water source that there were using for irrigation purposes in their plant growing operations. These water quality issues including total dissolved salts (TDS) around 2500 mg/l, as well as turbidity, mineral hardness ...

  • The viability of treated piggery wastewater for reuse in agricultural irrigation

    Background The swine production is a very important economic matter, occupying prominent position in the worldwide market. However, it appears as the greater impacting activity for the water resources. Researches point a swine manure production of 105.6 million m3/year in Brazil, which resulted in a piggery wastewater rich in solids, nutrients, heavy metals, and pathogens. Moreover, ...

  • Trichosporon species isolated from guano samples obtained from bat-inhabited caves in Japan

    Department of Microbiology, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiose, Tokyo 204-8588, Japan, Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Women's Medical University School of Medicine, Tokyo 162-8666, Japan, Teikyo University Institute of Medical Mycology, Tokyo 192-0395, Japan, Department of Geography, Faculty of Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan, Department of Applied ...

  • Pesticide and Pathogen Contamination of Vegetables in Ghana’s Urban Markets

    Abstract  The objective of the study was to determine and compare the current level of exposure of the Ghanaian urban population to hazardous pesticide and fecal coliform contamination through the consumption of fresh vegetables produced in intensive urban and periurban smallholder agriculture with informal wastewater irrigation. A total of 180 vegetable samples (lettuce, cabbage, and ...


    By Springer

  • How green was my Vertical Farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever.The problem is real and immediate. Even by most ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Quality Control in the Growing Cannabis Market

    As the Cannabis market grows for both medical and recreational use, so does the need for standardized quality control within the industry. When it comes to Cannabis quality control there are many things to consider, from moisture content to pesticide use. Moisture Content Cannabis flower moisture content should be tested and controlled to: minimize the risk of mold ...

  • Compost Science & Utilization Current research June 2007

    CROP RESPONSE Growth and transpiration of tomato seedlings grown in hazelnut husk compost under water stress Investigator: Damla Bender Ozenc, Ordu University, Department of Soil Science, Ordu, Turkey Objectives: To determine effects of composted hazelnut husk (CHH) on tomato seedlings grown under water stress conditions. Seven media were prepared using CHH mixed, in different ratios, with native ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization current research March 2007

    Crop Response Extractability, plant yield and toxicity thresholds for boron in compost Investigators: William F. Brinton and Eric Evans, Woods End Research Laboratory, Inc., Mt. Vernon, Maine Objectives: To determine the quantity of total and water-soluble boron in compost and other sources and their relationship to plant performance and toxicity symptoms; and to establish toxicity thresholds ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization: Current research

    Materials and Methods Composting To Eradicate Fusarium Graminearum From Infested Livestock FeedInvestigators: Francis J. Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; T. Kelly Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada Objectives: Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, could potentially become a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Commercial Experiences :Time for (compost) Tea in the Northwest

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Understanding Compost Tea

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • Composters Build Strong Links to California Farms

    The rapidly increasing amounts of compost applied to California farms can be traced to numerous factors — better crops, fewer disease problems, greater emphasis on product quality, mandated state recycling goals, savings in disposal costs and savings in chemical inputs. And then there’s the factor of friendship, longtime personal relationships that build trust between composters and farm ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Use of plant growth-promoting bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases: Principles, mechanisms of action, and future prospects

    Pathogenic microorganisms affecting plant health are a major and chronic threat to food production and ecosystem stability worldwide. As agricultural production intensified over the past few decades, producers became more and more dependent on agrochemicals as a relatively reliable method of crop protection helping with economic stability of their operations. However, increasing use of chemical ...

  • Arsenic in irrigated paddy soils

    Natural arsenic pollution of drinking water has been reported from over 70 countries world-wide, affecting an estimated 150 million people (Ravenscroft et. al., 2008). About 50 million of these people live in Bangladesh, 30 million in India and 33 million in six other countries of south and south-east Asia. It has recently been recognised that arsenic-contaminated groundwater used for irrigation ...

  • Focus on Australia & New Zealand: Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand

     Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand An Emerging Industry Takes Shape To deal with the waste stream in Australia and New Zealand, all strategies refer to organics recycling as a “fundamental vehicle for reaching future waste reduction targets,” notes Edmund Horan of RMIT University in Melbourne. “Composting provides a mechanism, not only for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Implementing Research : Georgia Takes Many Routes to Recycle Food Residuals

     PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines and tanks — which go back to 1941 — ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Hyphal growth: a tale of motors, lipids, and the spitzenkorper

    Filamentous fungi are a large and evolutionarily successful group of organisms of enormous ecological importance (27, 114). Fungi also have a considerable impact on our economy because they serve as bio-factories for the industrial production of proteins (90, 130) and because many fungi are human and plant pathogens that pose a threat to public health and agriculture (1, 105, 124). The basic ...

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