agriculture sheet Articles

  • Agriculture and Environment in EU-15 — the IRENA Indicator Report

    Background and purpose The IRENA operation (Indicator Reporting on the Integration of Environmental Concerns into Agriculture Policy) is a joint exercise between several Commission directorates-generals (DG Agriculture and Rural Development, DG Environment, Eurostat and DG Joint Research Centre, and the European Environment Agency (EEA) to develop agri-environmental indicators for monitoring the ...

  • FarmLink CEO calls for connected farms, investments to improve rural economies

    The agriculture industry is poised to leverage advanced data-driven, connected technology and sharing models to drive new innovation that will promote reinvestment in our rural communities, FarmLink’s CEO Ron LeMay said Tuesday at The White House Second Annual Rural Opportunity Investment Conference. “Agriculture is a fundamental component of America’s rural communities and ...


    By TractorExport

  • The economic impact of transgenic crops in developing countries: a note on the methods

    A vast literature has accumulated since crop varieties with transgenic resistance to insects and herbicide tolerance were released to farmers in 1996 and 1997. A comparatively minor segment of this literature consists of studies conducted by agricultural economists to measure the farm-level impact of transgenic crop varieties, the size and distribution of the economic benefits from adopting them ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • USDA now accepting applications for loan guarantees

    On July 16, 2015, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that USDA is accepting applications for loan guarantees up to $250 million through the Biorefinery, Renewable ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Strategies to Successfully Manage Northeastern Apple Pests

    A wide range of pests threaten Northeastern apple crops, forcing some growers to spend up to 25 percent of production costs to manage mites, insects, disease and other pests. Practical strategies to help growers lower this huge cost while protecting their region’s $580 million annual apple crop are outlined in ...

  • A hotter planet means less on our plates

    In the Sunday November 22, 2009 issue of Outlook in the Washington Post, Lester Brown discusses the significant implications of food security in the upcoming Copenhagen Conference. As the U.N. climate-change conference in Copenhagen approaches, we are in a race between political tipping points and natural ones. Can we cut carbon emissions fast enough to keep the melting of the Greenland ice ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Boosting Compost Markets : Iowa Studies Ways to Control Highway Erosion

    EROSION during and after road construction creates large amounts of silt, which deteriorates water quality and causes ecological problems. Iowa agencies continue to conduct studies to verify the value of compost as an economical way to prevent runoff along the state’s 100,000 miles of roadway. Next month will begin the second half of a two-year research project that involves the Iowa Department ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Business Developments

    SAN FRANCISCO BUILDING RAISES BAR ON SUSTAINABILITY The design by KMD Architects for a new l2-story headquarters of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission will demonstrate energy efficiency, water recycling and reduced carbon footprint. “Our intent from the beginning was to create the most energy-efficient building,” says PUC manager Anthony Irons. The $178 million, 254,000-sq ft ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Hurricane Clean Up for City of St. Petersburg

    Untitled Document THE city of St. Petersburg, Florida, after dodging Hurricane Charley's direct hit, received fringe winds from Hurricanes ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Clean, green and powered by cow patties

    Two dome-like structures rise out of the thick ice fog of a Prairie winter day. From a distance, a science-fiction city seems to be taking shape on the rolling grasslands of east-central Alberta. Then, as you draw near, another sensation takes hold – the oppressively pungent odour of cow manure. On this day, the enveloping fog is making the smell worse than usual, explains Bern ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Digging for data on Africa’s climate future

    The cardboard box is covered with a layer of dust so thick it must have been tucked away in this Kenyan basement for decades. The researcher wipes off the dust and rummages through the papers stored inside by someone long since retired. Sheet after sheet of neatly typed paper emerges, the faded rows of numbers detailing rainfall, temperature and wind speed. In a way, the researcher is hunting for ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Compost Utilization goes Through the Roof

    Untitled Document Center for Green Roof Research at Penn State University uses compost in its media studies and plans to explore microbial communities. AT the Penn State ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Learn to Diagnose Problems in Your Trees, Including New Beech Disease

    A mystery illness is hitting northeast Ohio’s American beech trees. Called beech leaf disease, it’s causing striped and curled leaves, weak buds, and sometimes the death of saplings. It seems to be spreading fast, too. “And we really don’t know what’s causing it,” said Kathy Smith, forestry ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Biocycle World

    OPTIONS FOR MANAGING COMPOST LEACHATE DURING EXCESSIVE RAINFALL CONDITIONSAn Information Sheet prepared by The Composting Association in the United Kingdom gives an overview of available options for managing “liquor” (leachate) produced at composting sites - especially following the excessively rainy spring/summer of 2007. “Compost leachate” can be described as water that has changed in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Innovations in Compost Facility Structures

    Untitled Document THE PROCESS of turning organic feedstocks - everything from yard trimmings, woody residuals, biosolids and manures - into compost involves moisture, heat and acids that can be tough on ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost science journal of advocacy and foresight

    SEVERAL months ago, I started on a journey through the pages of Compost Science, beginning with the Spring, 1960 inaugural issue. I was confident that I could whip through the articles and news items in the several hundred issues of the magazine between 1960 and 2009, and be prepared to write this article for BioCycle’s 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition. Granted, there were interruptions, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Piedmont Biofuels Spawns Ecoindustrial Park

    DRIVE to the end of Lorax Lane in Pittsboro, North Carolina, and you will discover a slice of the future of America. In one location, you can find - among other things -a biofuels station, a sustainable farm, a hydroponic greenhouse, a vermicomposting operation, an organic food distributor, a natural bug repellant manufacturer and a bookkeeper. And it all started with Piedmont Biofuels Industrial ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Users Forum: Compost Marketing Trends In The U.S.

    “We know there are limiting factors in this sector,” acknowledges Hans Van Dusen, who is on the contract implementation staff for Seattle Public Utilities. “Transient populations as well as space in downtown and older buildings are problematic, but multifamily recycling has emerged as a priority for the city.” Seattle has taken a number of steps to make its program more user friendly and flexible ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Advances in Oregon and Washington

    Over the years, different forces have served as drivers to help grow the composting industry. For example, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was the perceived landfill crisis that led to state bans on disposal of yard trimmings. Composting also has benefitted from a push to meet recycling goals, which has prompted states and local governments to go beyond yard trimmings and into such ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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