agriculture soil protection Articles

  • `Standards are desperately needed for plastic and pesticide contamination in soil´

    In addition to plastic in the oceans, plastic contamination in arable land throughout Europe and other parts of the world is a growing problem. No standards exist for these types of soil pollutants, nor for pesticide residues or their degradation products. For this reason, Professor Violette Geissen is calling for standards to be implemented. On 15 June, Geissen will deliver her inaugural address ...

  • Development of Waste Sawdust as a plant protection material for horticulture and agriculture

    Untitled Document Lignin is one of the major wastes of modern society, in the form of wood waste such as sawdust. In nature, lignin is ...

  • Morphological and transcriptional responses of Lycopersicon esculentum to hexavalent chromium in agricultural soil

    The carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic effects of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to living organisms through food chain raise the immediate need to assess the potential toxicological impacts of Cr(VI) on human health. Therefore, the concentration‐dependent responses of 12 Cr(VI)‐responsive genes selected from the high‐throughput Lycopersicon esculentum cDNA microarray were examined at ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Losing Soil

    In 1938, Walter Lowdermilk, a senior official in the Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, traveled abroad to look at lands that had been cultivated for thousands of years, seeking to learn how these older civilizations had coped with soil erosion. He found that some had managed their land well, maintaining its fertility over long stretches of history, and were ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • Introduction of composted digestates in agriculture

    Municipal organic waste is increasingly recycled by aerobic composting or anaerobic digestion procedures. In 1997, 230 000 Mg organic waste were composted and used for agriculture in the region of Cologne, which is an increase by 70% compared to 1994 (Anonymous, 1999). Therefore, the effects of compost on the soil and the plants require studies on:- its nutrient contents to contribute to the ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • Clothianidin in agricultural soils and uptake into corn pollen and canola nectar after multi‐year seed treatment applications

    Limited data are available on the fate of clothianidin under realistic agricultural production conditions. This is the first large‐scale assessment of clothianidin residues in soil and bee‐relevant matrices from corn and canola fields after multiple years of seed‐treatment use. The average soil concentration from 50 Midwest US corn fields with 2 to 11 years of planting clothianidin‐treated ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Protecting and restoring forests

    Protecting the earth’s nearly 4 billion hectares of remaining forests and replanting those already lost are both essential for restoring the earth’s health, an important foundation for the new economy. Reducing rainfall runoff and the associated flooding and soil erosion, recycling rainfall inland, and restoring aquifer recharge depend on simultaneously reducing pressure on forests and on ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Assessing Environmental Integration in EU Agriculture

    Farming has a strong impact on the environment in the European Union (EU), both in a negative and a positive sense. The common agricultural policy (CAP) is a major driver of the agricultural sector, and can therefore positively influence environmental management by farmers. This briefing investigates whether relevant policy measures are well-targeted from a biodiversity perspective. It ...

  • Monitoring of soil fertility

    Background In agriculture and forestry soil fertility is a decisive factor for the economic use of fields and forests. Various factors, considered as a whole are the indicators which characterize the soil fertility. Important parameters are e.g.: Intensity of precipitation, air temperature, air humidity, soil humidity, suction power and soil temperature in various depths. ...


    By The OTT Hydromet Group

  • Sustainable Soil Health

    “A Nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt. We have learned some harsh lessons about how to treat our soil. While most of us are aware of the problems of the past, some agricultural operations in the world are not heeding those lessons. We all know that healthy soil is essential to feed the ever-increasing ...

  • “Soil Health” And Compost

    In my quest to better understand how compost improves the chemical, physical and biological attributes of soil, I came across a training course created by the Rodale Institute, with support from the Northeast Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program called “An Introduction to Soil Health.” The course emphasized that if we can improve the overall quality of ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Good Agricultural Practice in the United States: Conservation and Climate

    Keywords: Good agricultural practice, conservation compliance, conservation incentives, land retirement, working land, sustainable agriculture, US agricultural policy, climate change and agriculture Abstract: Agriculture depends on the environment for production of food and fibre, yet agricultural activities may emit harmful pollutants. US law and policy encourage ...


  • Integrating ecosystem services into crop protection and pest management: Case study with the soil fumigant 1,3‐dichloropropene and its use in tomato production in Italy

    Ecosystems provide the conditions for producing food, regulating water, and providing wildlife habitats; these, among others, are known as ecosystem services (ESs). Food production is both economically and culturally important to southern European farmers, particularly in Italy where farmers grow flavorsome tomatoes with passion and pride. Growers rely on pesticides for crop protection, the ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Planting trees and managing soils to sequester carbon

    As of 2007, the shrinking forests in the tropical regions were releasing 2.2 billion tons of carbon per year. Meanwhile, expanding forests in the temperate regions were absorbing 0.7 billion tons of carbon annually. On balance, a net of some 1.5 billion tons of carbon were being released into the atmosphere each year, contributing to global warming. The tropical deforestation in Asia is driven ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Carbon Sequestration: Addressing Climate Change and Food Security through Sustainable Agriculture

    Introduction To meet the demands of a growing, increasingly urban global population (approximately 9 billion by 2050), the World Bank calculates that global food production must increase by 70% in the next 35 years. This is a great challenge not only because of the volume of food that must be produced, but because agricultural conditions will not remain constant or predicable ...


    By Climate Institute

  • Let’s stop treating our soil like dirt

    One of the most underappreciated resources on our planet, soil does much more than grow crops The United Nations’ International Year of Soils is hardly a media darling. Maybe it’s because many people are like me, who recall Mom’s words: “Take off your shoes! Don’t bring dirt ...


    By Ensia

  • Soil science gains voice in the US government

    The Soil Science Society of America’s (SSSA) Science Policy Office, started in 1986 and based in Washington, DC, educates United States (US) federal government policymakers about and advocates for soil and the soil sciences. As a result, US agricultural, natural resources and environmental legislation and corresponding federal rules and regulations are more scientifically sound and appropriately ...

  • Successful Partnerships between Agriculture and Water Utilities Highlighted in White Paper

    A white paper entitled Collaborating for Healthy Watersheds, highlighting nine successful municipal-agricultural collaborations that address water quality ...

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

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