agriculture weather protection Articles

  • Easter Freeze of 2007: analysis by the National Climatic Data Center

    Unseasonably warm weather in March 2007 over the eastern half of the United States prompted early growth of many agricultural and horticultural crops, ranging from wheat in the Central Plains to fruit trees and pastures across the Southeast and parts of the Midwest. March monthly temperatures averaged between 2 and 6°F above normal in these areas, and this was the second warmest March on record ...

  • The disappearing rivers of Bangladesh

    Bangladesh is a land of rivers, but changing climate has caused a third of the country’s more than 300 large rivers to disappear. The rivers are drying out as a result of barriers built upstream to divert water and protect people from floods that have become more frequent as the weather becomes more ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Consider Cable Concrete Erosion Control Solutions for Natural and Manmade Causes of Ground Erosion

    The weather is a powerful force that’s capable of leaving all types and levels of destruction in its wake. Shifting soil is one of the most common results of wet or windy weather, and it’s a natural event needed to maintain the environment. Something to note, however, is that although soil erosion is a naturally occurring process, there are times when erosion situations are influenced ...

  • Paying a premium for climate resilience

    What is the best way to protect vulnerable rural communities from the damaging impacts of climate change? Insurance could be an answer, but it raises a number of difficult questions. To illustrate, the New York Times recently ran a story, “Report Says a Crop Subsidy Cap ...

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • Understanding uncertainty to prevent humanitarian crises

    Dialogue enables scientists and communities to work with uncertain information, say humanitarian policy experts Emma Visman and colleagues. The international humanitarian and development community does not like uncertainty. Although increasingly effective in many ways, recent crises in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Putting community resilience into practice - Initial lessons learned

    Partners for Resilience (PfR) is a collaboration of CARE Nederland, Cordaid, the Netherlands Red Cross (NLRC), the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre, Wetlands International and 30 civil society partners in the global South. It is one of the biggest programmes of its kind in the world, working on ecosystem-based and climate-smart disaster risk reduction (DRR) in nine countries (see map below), ...


    By Wetlands International

  • It’s critical to blend climate tracking with development

    During the opening ceremony of the COP 20 climate conference, Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, remarked that the bustling halls and sun-drenched grass patches of the conference site were set up in just six weeks. The ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • A Discussion Outlining Filtration Of Horticultural Water From Influent To Effluent

    Since the beginning of time mankind has found it difficult to manage it's natural resources primarily due to economic pressures, greed and power. It is evident from increased population and usage of water like never before that the Worlds potable water resources are slowly being depleted due to, extraction, waste, over usage, and contamination. As we entered the Twenty First Century ...


    By AguaSeguridad

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Advancements in chemistry are providing growers with flexibility when managing slug pressures in potato crops.

    Flexibility in slug control The mild and wet weather and lack of ground frosts seen this winter, means that being vigilant to slug activity will be key as we move into the potato planting season. Andrew Sprunt, Agrii’s Northern region potato technical agronomist, explains what growers can expect from the season ahead, and how to manage the potential impact at farm level, ...


    By Certis UK

  • In-Vessel Composting of Residential Organics

    In 1994, the Regional Municipality of Peel began work on a system for residential organic residuals collection and composting. Although Peel had been promoting backyard composting, greater diversion rates were sought. The public was surveyed to determine what level of cooperation could be expected for source separation and setting out of food, soiled paper products, yard trimmings, etc. “We knew ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Utilization goes Through the Roof

    Untitled Document Center for Green Roof Research at Penn State University uses compost in its media studies and plans to explore microbial communities. AT the Penn State ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • How innovation is flourishing at the grassroots

    SciDev.Net reporters across the developing world describe exciting initiatives aimed at supporting innovation in local communities and remote areas. From small-scale hydro-powered electricity in Malaysia to cost-saving solar pumps in Pakistan, communities across the developing world are ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Agroecology can help fix our broken food system. Here’s how.

    The various incarnations of the sustainable food movement need a science with which to approach a system as complex as food and farming. This story was co-published with Food Tank, a nonprofit organization focused on building a global community for safe, healthy, nourished eaters. Thumb through U.S. newspapers any day in early 2015, and you could find stories on ...


    By Ensia

  • Jatropha as Bio-Diesel

    Introduction:- Jatropha curcus L. belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae. It is believed to be a native of South America & Africa but later spread to other continents of the world by the Portuguese settlers. The Arabs have ...


  • Focus on Australia & New Zealand: Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand

     Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand An Emerging Industry Takes Shape To deal with the waste stream in Australia and New Zealand, all strategies refer to organics recycling as a “fundamental vehicle for reaching future waste reduction targets,” notes Edmund Horan of RMIT University in Melbourne. “Composting provides a mechanism, not only for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • Composting Livestock Mortalities

    Performance, composting methods, environmental impacts and biosecurity of the process are evaluated for emergency disposal of cattle by research team at Iowa State University. A THREE-YEAR study was commissioned by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to evaluate the practical feasibility, performance, environmental impacts and biosecurity of using composting for emergency disposal - should a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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