agronomists Articles

  • After 10,000 years of agriculture, whither agronomy?

    The evolution of agriculture within the last 11,000 yr marked the first major inflection point in food yield and changed forever the character of the human condition. The application of technology to agriculture early in the 20th Century induced the next major crop yield inflexion point. Identifying the technological wellspring from which increased rates of productivity will be obtained in the ...

  • History, achievements, and current status of genetic resources conservation

    This paper has been written to look back at the early period of crop genetic resources conservation and inform readers of what has been achieved so far and what needs to be done in the future. The recognition of the value of crop genetic resources and early efforts at collecting germplasm by pioneer plant explorers, such as F.N. Meyer and N.I. Vavilov, and some of the strategies they employed are ...

  • Impact of defoliation on corn forage quality

    Hail damage can be a serious problem on corn (Zea mays L.) grown for silage. The value of corn grown for silage is a function of both the yield and quality of the forage produced. An improved understanding of the effects of defoliation on forage quality would improve the ability of agronomists, farmers, and crop insurance adjusters to assess the economic impact of hail damage to corn harvested ...

  • Ecogeographic factors affecting inflorescence emergence of cool-season forage grasses

    The ability to predict when a cool-season forage grass cultivar will begin inflorescence emergence under different ecogeographical conditions would allow plant breeders, agronomists, and grass-seed marketers to better position that cultivar into a forage production system. Our objective was to determine the ecogeographical factors (longitude, latitude, elevation, day of year when average daily ...

  • Making sustainable intensification work on sound evidence

    Assessing the real-world impact of new agronomic practices depends on good economic studies, says David Spielman. A new narrative is slowly taking hold of today's collective thinking about productivity, growth and poverty reduction in developing-country agriculture: the concept of ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Corn cob characteristics in irrigated central great plains studies

    Escalating fossil fuel cost and concern over global climate change have accelerated interest in cellulosic feedstocks, such as corn (Zea mays L.) cobs, for liquid fuel production. Little information is available about this plant organ. We compiled and summarized available cob data from several recent field studies in the Central Great Plains. Data were collected from two locations in Colorado and ...

  • Reforms to the Chinese Pesticide Regulation System

    Like so many other regulatory programs in China, pesticide regulations are changing. At the 8th China High-Level Forum on Pesticides, Ying Ji, Chief Agronomist of the Institute for the Control of Agrochemicals, Ministry of Agriculture (ICAMA), stated that the future of pesticide regulation in China will see more emphasis placed on industrial development, registration security, the application of ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Soil science gains voice in the US government

    The Soil Science Society of America’s (SSSA) Science Policy Office, started in 1986 and based in Washington, DC, educates United States (US) federal government policymakers about and advocates for soil and the soil sciences. As a result, US agricultural, natural resources and environmental legislation and corresponding federal rules and regulations are more scientifically sound and appropriately ...

  • Why women and youth are the key to feeding the world

    Diversifying the next generation of agricultural leaders will lead to fewer hungry people, better societies and improved health. When you look to the year ahead, what do you see? Ensia recently invited eight global thought leaders to share their vision for the environment as it relates to business, culture, ecosystems, energy, food, health, water and the world ( ...


    By Ensia

  • Enriching African soils key to boosting crop yields

    In African countries where farmers have access and can afford to buy fertiliser, there is a profound difference in agricultural yields, a feature in Nature notes. The red soil found across much of the continent is low in organic matter and key nutrients, and intensive farming in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Lessons learned from potato growers down-under

    Andy Alexander, specialist potato consultant and agronomist, has provided advice across the UK and Australia for over 35 years, and has travelled to the southern continent over 17 times. He explains how adapting to change in a volatile climate has been key to success for growers in Australia, and what lessons UK growers can take from this. “My role is to provide business ...


    By Certis UK

  • Advancements in chemistry are providing growers with flexibility when managing slug pressures in potato crops.

    Flexibility in slug control The mild and wet weather and lack of ground frosts seen this winter, means that being vigilant to slug activity will be key as we move into the potato planting season. Andrew Sprunt, Agrii’s Northern region potato technical agronomist, explains what growers can expect from the season ahead, and how to manage the potential impact at farm level, ...


    By Certis UK

  • Taking the Guesswork Out of Precision Scouting Drones

    The Rise of Precision Scouting Drones A few weeks ago, I attended a summit at Louisiana State University regarding precision scouting drones and their application in agriculture. It was a wonderfully informational gathering of agronomists, producers, and a few lucky industry types like myself. Professors and agronomic experts from the LSU Extension Service presented their ...


    By Sentera, LLC

  • A big slug year ahead?

    In addition to the weather, stubble clean-ups and green bridge carry-over are the two other major contributors, which means that high slug pellet usage on farms across the UK is likely this year, explains Justin Smith agronomist for Bartholomews Agri Food Ltd. “I work with farmers in the East Sussex and Kent areas, most of whom farm in vulnerable water catchment areas and are looking for ...


    By Certis UK

  • Digested Dairy Manure To High-End Potting Soil

    Robert Joblin and Ted Sniegocki of Cenergy USA based in Little Rock, Arkansas, are not horticulturalists or agronomists. But they are anaerobic digester developers and when falling rates for renewable energy and the loss of the federal Investment Tax Credit grant hit at the same time, the financial models they had been using “fell down.” The need for additional revenue streams for AD ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Crop sensors outdo farmers at choosing nitrogen rates

    Choosing how much nitrogen (N) to put on corn fields isn’t something farmers take lightly. Many factors go into the decision, including past experiences, the timing of application, yield goals, and results from soil tests. Nevertheless, crop sensors can select N rates for corn that outperform those chosen by farmers, according to more than 50 on-farm demonstration projects conducted in ...

  • 19 Things the AP Got Wrong

    The Associated Press recently published an article on “the secret environmental cost of U.S. ethanol policy.” There is much in this article that is too misleading, poor or deficient analysis, over-simplistic, or poorly drawn conclusions to comment on, but here are 19 big things the AP got wrong. ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Investing in people and evidence for sustainable farming

    Evaluation of farming systems, new ideas and learning with practitioners should be part of a transformed agriculture. Food security is difficult to pin down. It can be explained simply as access to enough food. But behind that simplicity lies an interconnected web of factors — from food prices to ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • New approaches are needed for another Green Revolution

    Twenty-first century agriculture needs low-input advances like the System of Rice Intensification, says Norman Uphoff. According to the principle of diminishing returns, continuing to produce something in the same way, with the same inputs and technology, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Composters Build Strong Links to California Farms

    The rapidly increasing amounts of compost applied to California farms can be traced to numerous factors — better crops, fewer disease problems, greater emphasis on product quality, mandated state recycling goals, savings in disposal costs and savings in chemical inputs. And then there’s the factor of friendship, longtime personal relationships that build trust between composters and farm ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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