aquaculture directive Articles

  • Future Brief: Sustainable Aquaculture

    Is sustainable aquaculture possible? Aquaculture is facing a new era of expansion in Europe. What are the environmental implications of this, and how can the sector expand sustainably? This Future Brief from Science for Environment Policy presents an overview of research into aquaculture’s impacts, and considers how it could develop in harmony with environmental goals. The ...


    By European Commission

  • Protecting ireland’s aquaculture

    Background Mulroy Bay in North West Ireland is a pristine marine environment with a number of rare and sensitive habitats. As a result Mulroy Bay is designated as a Special Area of Conservation under the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC). The sheltered nature of the bay has seen it develop into a major centre for aquaculture producing shellfish and salmon with an annual value of ...


    By The OTT Hydromet Group

  • Aquaculture case study

    Customer: USDA-ARS Catfish Genetics Research Unit,USA Casey C. Grimm from the Southern Regional Research Centre New Orleans, USA. This research was executed by Ph.D. Paul V. Zimba from the USDA-ARS Catfish Genetics Research Unit, USA and Casey C. Grimm from the Southern Regional Research Centre New Orleans, USA, utilizing the LG Sonic ultrasound technology in channel catfish production. An ...


    By LG Sonic

  • Ecological impacts of fluridone and copper sulphate in catfish aquaculture ponds

    Fluridone and copper sulphate are often used for controlling macrophytes and algae in aquaculture ponds. The present study examined the ecological effects of these chemicals on macrophyte, phytoplankton, and zooplankton biomass, plankton community structure, water quality parameters, and fish survival and yield in catfish culture ponds using a randomized complete block design. The estimated ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Questions and Answers on the Directive on Maritime Spatial Planning

    Why do we need a Directive on Maritime Spatial Planning? The uncoordinated use of coastal and maritime areas creates competition for maritime space and is an inefficient use of marine resources. A lack of predictability regarding appropriate access to the maritime space has created an uncertain climate for investment. With rapidly increasing demand for maritime space for new ...

  • Animation: restoring eroded coast Java by Building with Nature

    Northern Java's coasts suffer from severe erosion. In one decade, some coastal areas have retreated by three kilometres. Developmnet of coastal infrastructure and aquaculture went hand in hand with the removal of protective mangrove forests and the disturbance of sediment flows towards the coast and floodplains. Replanting of mangroves has not been successful, as the sediment balance is too ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Development of a Bioaccumulation Model For Herbicides in Ulva and Clams

    Coastal lagoons are shallow water ecosystems characterised by high biodiversity and primary and secondary production, and with an elevated number of different habitats. These habitats have a key role as nursery and rest areas for a great number of marine species and birds. During the last decades these ecosystems have been exposed tomany anthropogenic pressures (urban, domestic, agricultural ...


  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Composting Hits Home Runs Across Canada

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • U.S. Farm-Raised Finfish and Shellfish

    Seafood has long been recognized as an important component of a healthy diet. Seafood contains high quality, complete protein and an important array of nutrients, while it is low in calories, cholesterol, and saturated fats. The health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids found primarily in fish have been clearly documented. U.S. farm-raised seafood is an important center of the plate choice that can ...


    By Aquacare Environment Inc

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Monitoring greenhouse gases from biofuel crops

    Global issues such as climate change and energy security have driven rapid growth in renewable energy production - wind, solar, tidal, geothermal, hydro, biofuels etc. However, logically, each of these methods should deliver a net benefit in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, so researchers in the United States have employed portable FTIR analysers to study the GHG emissions of biomass ...


    By Gasmet Technologies Oy

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