aquaculture fish nutrition Articles

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Shrimp farming: Why prevention is better than medicine

    Disease challenges that have affected a number of key shrimp production regions around the world in recent years have increased the focus on producing healthier and more robust stocks. In addition to establishing very strict sanitary requirements, many shrimp farmers have sought new health-specific diets across the shrimp lifecycle that progress growth and reduce bacterial challenges. Some, ...


    By Skretting - Nutreco Group

  • Seasteading could be the answer to sustainably feeding 9 billion people

    Self-sufficient nation states in the middle of the ocean might be our ticket to a sustainable future. Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth’s surface, yet provide less than 2 percent of the food we eat. The growing demand for seafood, however — predicted to rise to 8 percent during the next decade — from an already depleted and exhausted ocean is forcing ...


    By Ensia

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

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