atlantic salmon Articles

  • In Situ Avoidance Response Of Adult Atlantic Salmon To Waste From The Wood Pulp Industry

    An accidental release of non-toxic waste from decommissioned wood pulp industry in the River Numedalslågen, Southern Norway, occurred in the upper part of the accessible stretches for anadromous fish during a study of migration behaviour of radio tagged Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar, n=32, body length 51–99 cm). The fish had completed the migration phase and initiated the resident phase ...


    By Springer

  • Salmon aquaculture could incorporate seaweed and sea urchins to reduce nitrogen enrichment

    Farming fish together with seaweed and other species could help improve the sustainability of aquaculture and reduce pollution. A new study provides a tool for designing sustainable fish farming systems and calculates their potential to recycle waste. An example of a salmon farming system incorporating seaweed and sea urchins could reduce nitrogen releases to the environment by 45%. Over half of ...

  • Transgenic fish are ready for us. Are we ready for them?

    After decades of regulatory and legal challenges, AquaBounty aims to bring genetically engineered salmon to U.S. and Canadian markets next year. On a hill above the cold waters around Prince Edward Island, technicians painstakingly create fertilized Atlantic salmon eggs that include growth-enhancing DNA from two other fish species. The eggs will be shipped to ponds in the high rainforest of ...


    By Ensia

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • State Fish Hatcheries and Invasive Species Don’t Mix

    INTRODUCTION The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is responsible for the protection and management of the state’s fish populations. Cultured fish are stocked in natural and manmade areas that are excellent for growth and survival but have little or no spawning habitat. Other stocking areas include natural water bodies where spawning and nursery habitats have been destroyed or isolated from ...

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