bee health Articles

  • 7 Species of Bees Added to Endangered List

    Introduction For the first time in history, several American bee species have been classified as endangered. There are many factors that have contributed to the decline in bee populations in recent years, with climate change being at the root of many of these issues. In order to save the dwindling number of bees, we must implement the mitigation and management plans that are in place, ...


    By Climate Institute

  • Metal contaminant accumulation in the hive: Consequences for whole colony health and brood production in the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.)

    Metal pollution has been increasing rapidly over the past century, and at the same time, the human population has continued to rise and produce contaminants that may negatively impact pollinators. Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) forage over large areas and can collect contaminants from the environment. The primary objective was to determine whether the metal contaminants cadmium (Cd), copper ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Can superfoods boost the planet’s health, too?

    As demand for African and Asian tree-based superfoods grows, researchers and entrepreneurs eye ways to maximize benefits for the environment. It can seem like new health food fads pop up every week — fads that often fade as quickly as they appear. Two gaining steam lately, though, may be worth a longer look: baobab and moringa. Traditional fare in parts of Africa (and for moringa, ...


    By Ensia

  • Enzymatic biomarkers as tools to assess environmental quality: A case study of exposure of the honey beeapis mellifera to insecticides

    This work was intended to evaluate the responses of enzymes in the honey bee Apis mellifera upon exposure to deltamethrin, fipronil and spinosad and their use as biomarkers. After LD50 determination, honey bees were exposed at doses of 5.07 and 2.53 ng/bee for deltamethrin, 0.58 and 0.29 ng/bee for fipronil and 4.71 and 2.36 ng/bee for spinosad (equivalent to LD50/10 and LD50/20, ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Risks of neonicotinoid insecticides to honeybees

    The European honeybee, Apis mellifera, is an important pollinator of agricultural crops. Since 2006, when unexpectedly high colony losses were first reported, articles have proliferated in the popular press suggesting a range of possible causes and raising alarm over the general decline of bees. Suggested causes include pesticides, genetically modified crops, habitat fragmentation, and ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • NAFTA TWG on Pesticides Meeting

    On November 3-5, 2015, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Technical Working Group (TWG) on Pesticides, established in 1997 to streamline certain pesticide shipments between Canada (CN), Mexico (MX), and the United States (U.S.), held a meeting hosted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Top trends conservationists should be paying attention to — but aren’t

    Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. ...


    By Ensia

  • We must hear — and heed — the nightingale’s warning

    Our rapidly changing world is devastating bird populations, reflecting the health of their habitats and sending us a message about the quality of our own lives. Many birders enjoy playing an imaginary game with one another: “Blindfold me and place me anywhere in the world — I bet I can identify where I am, as long as you let me hear the birds.” This ...


    By Ensia

  • What’s Happening to the Birds?

    Following in Rachel Carson’s footsteps, a new generation of scientists investigates a new generation of pesticides. Christy Morrissey is driving her white pickup truck along Canada’s endless prairie highway, windows open, listening for birds. She points to the scatter of ponds glinting in the landscape, nestled among fields of canola that stretch as far as the eye ...


    By Ensia

  • The developing world is awash in pesticides. Does it have to be?

    Herbicides, insecticides and fungicides threaten the environment and human health in many parts of the world. But research is pointing to a better approach. In today’s globalized world, it is not inconceivable that one might drink coffee from Colombia in the morning, munch cashews from Vietnam for lunch and gobble grains from Ethiopia for dinner. That we can enjoy these ...


    By Ensia

  • Food Waste Composting Progress In The Southeast

    Communities all over the Southeast are exploring program options to reach recycling goals set as high as 75 percent in some states. Many now have organics recycling — including food waste collection and composting — on their radar to increase existing recycling rates, especially once the capture of “low-hanging fruit” such as newspaper, plastic and aluminum, etc. is ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Revolution through fresh sugar cane juice centers

    This is quite common street business found everywhere in India. Sugarcane juice vendors extract sugarcane juice in presence of customers and serve the glasses of fresh juice to the people. Mostly this business is on the street, very rarely in shops. Small sugarcane crushers are mostly driven by 1 hp motor where repeated crushing is done many times to extract enough juice. Hand ...


    By AADHUNIK GLOBAL ENERGY

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you