beef cattle farm Articles

  • Beef Farmer Spring 2017 `Trace elements are key to growth rates`

    Iodine has a direct impact on growth rates as it is incorporated into the thyroid hormones which control metabolism, promoting efficient live weight gain. Annie Williams, Animal Scientist with Agrimin says that many beef units fall short on achieving optimum growth rates because animals do not receive adequate levels of trace elements at grass. She says that with increased feed costs, many ...


    By Agrimin Limited

  • Impacts of beef producer compensation programmes to remediate negative economic outcomes of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Canada

    Before the first domestic case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was identified in May 2003, Canada was the world's third largest exporter of cattle behind the USA and Australia. After the detection of BSE, over 30 countries imposed an immediate ban on imported Canadian beef and cattle products, including the USA. The interdependence of the Canadian beef industry with that of the US ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Building reservation economies: Cattle, American Indians and the American West

    Removal to reservations involved American Indians in changing economies and federal 'civilisation' programs that were fueled by beef cattle, breeding cattle, working cattle (oxen) and dairy cattle. As 19th century reservations expanded, Native Americans negotiated the bovine economies as consumers, labourers, producers, retailers and marketers. Cattle, working oxen and dairy cows were intended to ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • CORNucopia of Opportunity in the Heartland: Or Just More Feed for the Political Cattle?

    We now live in a carbon constrained world. Fears of human induced climate change are bringing about changes in government, corporate and consumer behaviors. Investments in renewable energy are increasing, corporations are greening everything from their supply chain to their vehicle fleet, and consumers are seeking to minimize their ecologic footprint as well. Are some of our greening efforts ...


    By AHC Group

  • Lessons learned from bovine spongiform encephalopathy for the future management of the Canadian cattle industry

    Globally, Canada is only a minor beef producing country, and yet ranks fourth among countries exporting beef products. That fact alone shows considerable market vulnerability. When coupled with dependence on corporate-owned slaughter capacity and heavy reliance on only one export market (the USA), that vulnerability is magnified. Economic losses from BSE in Canada following the occurrence of the ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Ecosystem management planning for farm conversion - case study

    Based on a survey that revealed unexpected plant and animal treasures, we developed an ecosystem management plan to harmonise activity with the environment. Based on a survey that revealed unexpected plant and animal treasures on a Western Cape Farm, we developed an ecosystem management plan to harmonise economic activity with the natural environment. Voorhoede Farm near Caledon in the ...

  • Las Vegas DirtWorkz, Inc.: Using the City’s wood waste to farm the desert

    Ray Becerra knows a thing or two about recycling, reusing and repurposing waste materials. You might even say it’s in his blood. Becerra has spent his entire life around landfills and farming operations, and he wears his passion for recycling waste materials on his sleeve. His enthusiasm for dust, dirt and debris, says Becerra, comes from his father, an avid recycler who was involved in the ...

  • South East framing review

    Drilling a borehole on a farm can cost less than a conventional water supply and cut the carbon footprint from pumping and treating mains water. "There is an environmental as well as a cost argument for drilling a borehole,' said Ben Nicholls, joint managing director with his brother Richard of Nicholls Boreholes, which is based in West Sussex. Nicholls Boreholes is in an office on an ...

  • Reducing the Environmental Impact of Cows` Waste

    No disrespect to cows, but they produce a lot of gas. And while farmers may be unfazed by the smell, the gas is methane, one of the most potent greenhouse gases. Across the globe, livestock spew 14.5 percent of all greenhouse gases (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and fluorinated gases) released in the environment, and over half that comes specifically from cows, according to a United ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Clean, green and powered by cow patties

    Two dome-like structures rise out of the thick ice fog of a Prairie winter day. From a distance, a science-fiction city seems to be taking shape on the rolling grasslands of east-central Alberta. Then, as you draw near, another sensation takes hold – the oppressively pungent odour of cow manure. On this day, the enveloping fog is making the smell worse than usual, explains Bern ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Simulating gross primary productivity of humid-temperate pastures

    Although most pasture growth models simulate many above- and belowground components of the plant community, calibration and validation are usually based only on periodic measurements of aboveground forage yield. This research used daily measurements of gross primary productivity (GPP) to validate the photosynthesis subroutine of the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM). The model was calibrated ...

  • Fishing for a Solution

    As writer Rowan Jacobsen explores in our recent feature “Has Meat Met Its Match?,” animal agriculture’s hefty environmental footprint is creating interest in exploring ways to meet humans’ growing appetite for animal protein that extend beyond beef, chicken and pork. In some places, that ...


    By Ensia

  • UNTHA staff spotlight – Christian Lanner

    Christian Lanner talks all things technical before considering the best way to recharge his brain… Name: Christian Lanner Job title: Technical Director 1. What does your role entail? I am lucky to have a very varied job, which includes everything from product ...


    By UNTHA Shredding Technology

  • Closed-Loop Companies

    At Big Rock Brewery, spent grain is used as cattle feed. Pictured here is brewmaster Paul Gautreau. Alberta may not always get an A-grade when it comes to the environment, but in some areas the province’s enterprises are on the leading edge. In industries from agriculture to forestry to beer, Alberta businesses are taking their own initiative to become closed-loop producers – that ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Growing demand for soybeans threatens Amazon rainforest

    Some 3,000 years ago, farmers in eastern China domesticated the soybean. In 1765, the first soybeans were planted in North America. Today the soybean occupies more U.S. cropland than wheat. And in Brazil, where it spread even more rapidly, the soybean is invading the Amazon rainforest. For close to two centuries after its introduction into the United States the soybean languished as a curiosity ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Composting Livestock Mortalities

    Performance, composting methods, environmental impacts and biosecurity of the process are evaluated for emergency disposal of cattle by research team at Iowa State University. A THREE-YEAR study was commissioned by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to evaluate the practical feasibility, performance, environmental impacts and biosecurity of using composting for emergency disposal - should a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The number one thing each of us can do to protect biodiversity

    Reducing our consumption of animal products can go a long way toward conserving endangered habitat around the world. Agriculture expansion is the leading driver of natural habitat loss worldwide. However, most of this growth is not to produce vegetables, fruits or grains to be eaten by people. Ecosystems are destroyed overwhelmingly to feed livestock. Livestock production ...


    By Ensia

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

  • Composting In rural Alaska

    Gardeners, communities and commercial enterprises have proven that composting works in Alaska, especially given large quantities of fish waste and diminishing landfill capacity. ALASKA is two and a half times larger than the largest state in the lower 48 states. Over half of the entire state’s population lives within the municipality of Anchorage. Many Alaskan villages can only be reached ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you