beet growing Articles

  • Sugar Beet Harvest Simplified with Aire-O2 Tritons - Case Study

    Overview: Sucrafor, a COSUMAR Groupe sugar beet processing plant in north east (Oriental) of Morocco, designed a wastewater treatment plant to maintain high organic loads through anaerobic, anoxic, and aerated lagoons; as they crush more than 5,000 tons of sugar beets daily. Due to the high organic loads and tightening BOD/COD standards, Aeration Industries International’s ...

  • Land application of sugar beet by-products: effects on Nitrogen mineralization and crop yields

    Land application of food processing wastes has become an acceptable practice because of the nutrient value of the wastes and potential cost savings in their disposal. Spoiled beets and pulp are among the main by-products generated by the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing industry. Farmers commonly land apply these by-products at rates >224 Mg ha–1 on a fresh weight basis. However, ...

  • Land application of sugar beet by-products: Effects on runoff and percolating water quality

    Water quality concerns, including greater potential for nutrient transport to surface waters resulting in eutrophication and nutrient leaching to ground water, exist when agricultural or food processing industry wastes and by-products are land applied. Plot- and field-scale studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of sugar beet by-products on NO3–N and P losses and biochemical oxygen demand ...

  • One-Quarter of World’s Agriculture Grows in Highly Water-Stressed Areas

    All living creatures need two things to survive: food and water. A new WRI analysis shows just how much tension exists between those two essential resources. A new interactive map from WRI’s Aqueduct project reveals that more than 25 percent of the ...

  • Record Crops Predicted – Storing Chemicals in Suitable Vertical Storage Tanks

    The US is celebrating bumper crops this year, according to Farming UK. The publication states that the record-breaking corn harvest this year surpassed expectations of the US Department of Agriculture and it seems that because of the warm summer this year, that the UK could be following in its footsteps. Farming UK also reports on a trial that examines the good health ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • Wolf, bird and bread!

    Eyüp Yüksel was relaxing in Ankara on a warm autumn day in 2000, drinking tea from a traditional glass cup, when he heard the news that Tuz Gölü — Lake Tuz or Salt Lake — had been declared a protected area. As one of the staff of the Turkish Environmental Protection Agency for Special Areas (EPASA) he had been waiting and hoping for this decision but he was still ...

  • Beef Farmer Spring 2017 `Trace elements are key to growth rates`

    Iodine has a direct impact on growth rates as it is incorporated into the thyroid hormones which control metabolism, promoting efficient live weight gain. Annie Williams, Animal Scientist with Agrimin says that many beef units fall short on achieving optimum growth rates because animals do not receive adequate levels of trace elements at grass. She says that with increased feed costs, many ...


    By Agrimin Limited

  • A big slug year ahead?

    In addition to the weather, stubble clean-ups and green bridge carry-over are the two other major contributors, which means that high slug pellet usage on farms across the UK is likely this year, explains Justin Smith agronomist for Bartholomews Agri Food Ltd. “I work with farmers in the East Sussex and Kent areas, most of whom farm in vulnerable water catchment areas and are looking for ...


    By Certis UK

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • How three U.S. mini-farms are sowing the seeds of global food security

    Tiny, biointensive operations show smallholder farmers from around the world how they can grow far more food than conventional approaches. Her face shaded by a wide-brimmed straw hat, Olawumi Benedict is cheerfully tending to her “little babies” — kale seedlings growing in shallow wooden flats until they’re hardy enough for transplantation into soil beds. Three miles over ...


    By Ensia

  • Can genetic engineering help quench crops’ thirst?

    Researchers around the world are exploring how GMO technology might boost food production under hot, dry conditions. Roger Deal is trying to figure out how plants remember drought. An assistant professor of biochemistry and genetics at Emory University, Deal says most plants have a kind of memory for stress. When experiencing water shortage, for example, plants close ...


    By Ensia

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Pesticides in the European Union

    There has been a sharply falling trend in the total volume of sales of agricultural pesticides in the EU between 1991 and 1995. But this was reversed in 1996. From 1991-1995, EU sales of pesticides, measured by weight of active ingredients (ai), fell by 13%. They then rose by 6% between 1995 and 1996 to stand at 299,826 tonnes ai. But this still put them nearly 8% below the 1991 figure. The use ...

  • Earth out of sync rising temperatures throwing off seasonal timing

    A newly hatched chick waits with hungry mouth agape for a parent to deliver its first meal. A crocus peaks up through the snow. Rivers flow swiftly as ice breaks up and snows melt. Sleepy mammals emerge from hibernation, and early frog songs penetrate the night. Spring awakening has long provided fodder for poets, artists, and almanac writers. Even for a notoriously fickle time of sunshine, ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • AminoA+ Update and Autumn Recommendations 2016

    AminoA+ Update With harvest 2016 coming to a close and also the first year of our commercial sales of AminoA+ we thought we should review the results and also make some recommendations based on this years’ experience. ...


    By AminoA Ltd

  • Closed loop system takes manure and methane

    A CONVERSION plant in Mead, Nebraska is processing manure and methane to create ethanol and compost. According to Nebraska Governor Dave Heineman: “This plant sets a new standard for ethanol production in this state and our nation, and is an example of the innovation needed to take this industry to the next level. It lets America get its automotive fuel from the croplands of the Midwest instead ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Understanding Compost Tea

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Commercial Experiences :Time for (compost) Tea in the Northwest

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • One Year Later · Persistent Herbicides in Compost

    ONE YEAR has passed since the Washington State University (WSU) composting facility and the Spokane Regional Compost Facility discovered traces of persistent herbicides in their composts. In Spokane, the source of contamination is a compound called clopyralid. Compost contamination at WSU initially involved the herbicide picloram, but clopyralid has since been detected in the compost also. In ...


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