biological agriculture course Articles

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

  • “Soil Health” And Compost

    In my quest to better understand how compost improves the chemical, physical and biological attributes of soil, I came across a training course created by the Rodale Institute, with support from the Northeast Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program called “An Introduction to Soil Health.” The course emphasized that if we can improve the overall quality of ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Building a Safe Pesticides Industry with Bioproducts and Biomethods

    Three publications on my desk are the motivating factors behind this issue’s Compost Users Forum. The first is our own Compost Science & Utilization (Summer, l999), a journal that reports research throughout the world dealing with the process and product of compost making. The initial report in this issue is titled: “Prospects for Composts and Biocontrol Agents as Substitutes for Methyl ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Let`s reconnect green issues and development post-2015

    Post-2015 discussions offer a chance to link the environmental and development agendas — it shouldn't be bypassed, says Myles A. Wickstead. A quarter of a century ago, scientists could justifiably take some sense of satisfaction from their ability to set in motion policy shifts towards protecting the global environment. They had become increasingly worried by the ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Regulation of nitrogen contents of Composts during composting first experimental results

    More than 3 Mio. Mg of compost were produced in Germany in 1998 (Wiemer and Kern 1998). Kitchen and garden waste from households as well as waste from landscaping and parks were used as substrates to a high extent. The composts were mainly used in landscaping, recultivation, horticulture, substrate production and in agriculture. Applied on cultivable land compost can improve the soil structure ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • Science and development highlights of 2012

    The year was marked by one of the most anticipated global environmental meetings in 20 years: the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The summit was a ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Phosphorus And Compost Use Dynamics

    Organic forms of phosphorus, such as biosolids and compost products, contain low to very low levels of water extractable phosphorus, but increasingly are regulated like inorganic P sources. Phosphorus is one of the 16 essential plant nutrients, and is considered one of the three major plant nutrients (along with nitrogen and potassium). Phosphorus is not only important in root development, but ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Poultry Farm Pioneers Low-Rate Composting

    Tony Pastore, Sr. started Park Farms in Canton, Ohio decades ago to process and market chickens. In 1989, it was decided that instead of buying chickens from other producers, a new venture would be launched to raise chickens directly for Park Farms. This led to the formation of A & J Farms, a 1,900-acre operation that contains 14 separately operating chicken farms. Each sub-farm has up to ten ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The complex nature of GMOs calls for a new conversation

    An honest discussion of genetically modified organisms must move beyond narrow concepts of human health to the wider social and environmental impacts of engineered crops. The GMO debate is one from which I’ve kept a purposeful distance. For one thing, it’s an issue that has already garnered more than its fair share of attention. For another, when you consider that many ...


    By Ensia

  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Hits Home Runs Across Canada

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Purchasing: Using Specifications to Expand Markets

    As part of its market development initiatives for urban bulk procurement of organics, the California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB) focused on preparing model specifications to assist purchasing of both compost and mulch. The aim was not to provide a single “best” specification, but to offer a series of “illustrative draft specs,” varying according to end user requirements. In ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Earth out of sync rising temperatures throwing off seasonal timing

    A newly hatched chick waits with hungry mouth agape for a parent to deliver its first meal. A crocus peaks up through the snow. Rivers flow swiftly as ice breaks up and snows melt. Sleepy mammals emerge from hibernation, and early frog songs penetrate the night. Spring awakening has long provided fodder for poets, artists, and almanac writers. Even for a notoriously fickle time of sunshine, ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Compost Plays Key Role in Green Roof Mixes

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Advances in Oregon and Washington

    Over the years, different forces have served as drivers to help grow the composting industry. For example, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was the perceived landfill crisis that led to state bans on disposal of yard trimmings. Composting also has benefitted from a push to meet recycling goals, which has prompted states and local governments to go beyond yard trimmings and into such ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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