biological crop protection Articles

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Fruitful results from a true IPM approach

    Paul Roberts, co-founder and partner of Ashdown Nursery, established nearly 30 years ago, grows approximately 160,000 strawberry plants for co-operative, Berry Gardens, in greenhouses covering 1.6 hectares. “This year, we’ve had to deal with a significant increase in the number of spidermite, thrips and whitefly,” explains Mr Roberts. “Over the years, I have used a ...


    By Certis UK

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • On-time Pest Protection

    Farming can be a beautiful job under an open sky. But sometimes that ”open sky” determines the flow of farming, total yield, and productivity according to the weather (rain, drought, hail, frost). Since the weather is a major factor in farming, farmers need to manage certain practices to protect their crops from bad weather conditions as well as from various insects and diseases ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Integrating ecosystem services into crop protection and pest management: Case study with the soil fumigant 1,3‐dichloropropene and its use in tomato production in Italy

    Ecosystems provide the conditions for producing food, regulating water, and providing wildlife habitats; these, among others, are known as ecosystem services (ESs). Food production is both economically and culturally important to southern European farmers, particularly in Italy where farmers grow flavorsome tomatoes with passion and pride. Growers rely on pesticides for crop protection, the ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • EPA Makes Available Supporting Documents for Endangered Species Biological Evaluations

    On December 11, 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) made publicly available several documents associated with the Biological Evaluations (BE) for the first three “pilot” chemicals that are being evaluated: chlorpyrifos, ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Advances in control of postharvest diseases in tropical fresh produce

    With increased global trade, fresh produce is increasingly being moved over vast distances to foreign markets. This requires effective cold chain and product management practices to ensure premium quality fresh produce with increased shelf life. Product safety has now also become an additional minimum requirement for market entry. Producers should therefore take cognisance of the impact ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • The Best Practices for Using Plant Residues

    Plant residue are crop materials such as stems, leaves, and roots, that are left on the field after the harvest. In the past, farmers considered crop residue to be trash, that was usually destroyed by fire. However, today this practice is not recommended and highly is not used by farmers. There are two different ways to manage crop residues. The first method is tillage prior planting when plant ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Five Ways to Manage the Soil for Planting

    The soil, as the primary resource for food production and the most important tool for every farmer, is crucial for farming. Successful farming begins with the quality soil, which provides water and essential nutrients to the crops. Rich and healthy soil, combined with the appropriate amount of water and sunlight can significantly contribute to global food production. Proper soil management ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Does escalating conflict and conservation challenges allow the Asian elephants to co–exist with humans in north India?

    The Shivalik Elephant Reserve (c 5405 Km²) appears to be one of India's most important biological area, which holds a healthy population of Asian elephants (±1,346) and sex areas ratio. But during the recent past, man–elephant conflict has escalated drastically in this region primarily due to the increasing movement of elephants in agricultural fields, and attacks. For the last six years, ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Are Conventional Farmers Becoming Interested in Organic Practices?

    Despite the fact that farming is one of the most important human activities that brings food to our tables, it contributes significantly to global pollution. Unsustainable farm practices result in the loss of biodiversity, climate changes, erosion, and the pollution of soil and water. However, when managed in a sustainable way, farming can be a source of solutions for future demands. Organic ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • EPA Releases Preliminary Risk Assessment for Neonicotinoid Insecticide Imidacloprid

    On January 6, 2016, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in collaboration with California’s Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) announced the release of a preliminary pollinator risk assessment for the neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid (Preliminary Risk Assessment or Assessment). In its assessment, ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • “Soil Health” And Compost

    In my quest to better understand how compost improves the chemical, physical and biological attributes of soil, I came across a training course created by the Rodale Institute, with support from the Northeast Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program called “An Introduction to Soil Health.” The course emphasized that if we can improve the overall quality of ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Biotechnology for Environmentally Safe Agriculture

    Issue: In Europe some uses of biotechnology are meeting vocal opposition from certain quarters. Nevertheless, the vast amount of knowledge acquired recently in biology can be used to develop and apply biotechnology for an environmentally safe agriculture. Public acceptance and a new policy impetus can serve to promote the introduction of safe and competitive agricultural technologies that have a ...

  • Evaluating exposure and potential effects on honeybee brood (Apis mellifera) development using glyphosate as an example

    This study aimed to develop an approach to evaluate potential effects of plant protection products on honeybee brood with colonies at realistic worst‐case exposure rates. The approach comprised two stages. In the first stage, honeybee colonies were exposed to a commercial formulation of glyphosate applied to flowering Phacelia tanacetifolia with glyphosate residues quantified in relevant ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Building a Safe Pesticides Industry with Bioproducts and Biomethods

    Three publications on my desk are the motivating factors behind this issue’s Compost Users Forum. The first is our own Compost Science & Utilization (Summer, l999), a journal that reports research throughout the world dealing with the process and product of compost making. The initial report in this issue is titled: “Prospects for Composts and Biocontrol Agents as Substitutes for Methyl ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Need for national soil policies for developing countries - some facts

    As a soil scientist working for more than 25 years, I am very much concerned with soil protection and conservation. In this process, I started collecting information related to national soil policies of different countries. To my surprise I could not get a well defined national soil policy for any one of the developing country? A developing country can be defined as , that country which has a ...

  • Soy Cultivation in South America

    The expansion of soy bean Soy cultivation has shown an increasing expansion throughout Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay, in the last decade. This remarkable increase is explained by its economical importance in the region, and as a consequence, it is difficult to regulate its progress and attenuate its potential socio-environmental impacts. In 2012, in these 4 countries the ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

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