biosolids fertilizer Articles

  • Soil fertilization with wastewater biosolids – monitoring changes in the ‘soil–fertilizer–plant’ system and phosphorus recovery options

    The aim of this study is to establish changes that may occur after a prolonged application of wastewater sludge treated to biosolids, in the ‘soil–fertilizer–plant’ system. Thirteen experimental plots with different soil types planted with experimental crops were investigated in order to evaluate the suitability of these biosolids as soil conditioners and fertilizers. The biosolids were ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Use of Lime Stabilized Biosolids for Turf Grass Production in the New Jersey Pinelands

    A 700 acre farm producing turf grass sod for residential and commercial uses has been utilizing liquid, lime stabilized biosolids as its primary source of plant macronutrients on approximately 380 acres since late 1995. The farm is located within the New Jersey Pinelands, a sensitive and unique ecosystem characterized by pine-oak forests, sandy soils and high quality ground and surface waters. ...

  • State Fertilizer Officials Focus on Compost

    For two years, the U.S. Composting Council’s (USCC) marketing committee has been meeting with the American Association of Plant Food Control Officials (AAPFCO) to discuss how the two organizations could work together to create a uniform compost bill to be given to each state legislature to consider adopting into law. AAPFCO is an organization of fertilizer control officials from each state in the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Evaluating Phosphorus release from biosolids and manure-amended soils under anoxic conditions

    The solubility of P in biosolids and manures has been shown to influence the potential for dissolved P losses in runoff and leachate when these materials are land applied. As a result, some Mid-Atlantic US states have developed P source coefficients (PSCs) to account for differences in P solubility between fertilizers, manures, and biosolids in P risk assessment tools. The reliability of these ...

  • The effect of different percentages of bulking agent (sawdust) on microbial quality of faecal sludge

    The use of raw sludge spread on land as conditioner and fertilizer has been practised over the years in urban agriculture. However, this raw sludge (biosolids) is associated with a potential health risk as a result of the pathogenic microorganisms it contains. The study considered the dewatering of faecal sludge (FS) mixed with sawdust to produce biosolids that can be applied as manure for ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Phosphorus And Compost Use Dynamics

    Organic forms of phosphorus, such as biosolids and compost products, contain low to very low levels of water extractable phosphorus, but increasingly are regulated like inorganic P sources. Phosphorus is one of the 16 essential plant nutrients, and is considered one of the three major plant nutrients (along with nitrogen and potassium). Phosphorus is not only important in root development, but ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Independent review of retrofitting Cambi to mad

    ABSTRACT Denmark has taken a very positive view of recovering energy from organic wastes by anaerobic digestion (AD) and then using  the digestate (digested material) on land. Substituting CHP (combined heat and power) from AD for fossil energy is part of  the national energy plan. Co-digestion of manure, putrescible waste and biosolids is becoming increasingly common. Part of  ...


    By Cambi Group AS

  • Implementing Research : Georgia Takes Many Routes to Recycle Food Residuals

     PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines and tanks — which go back to 1941 — ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Regional roundup

    Ithaca, New YorkCOMPOSTING PET WASTE AT DOG PARKCayuga Compost and Tompkins County Dog Owners Group launched a program on Earth Day this year to collect and compost pet waste at the Ithaca Dog Park. About 5,000 bags are used to collect 1,000 pounds of dog waste every month at the park. Plastic bags were previously provided by Wegmans supermarket, and disposed of in dumpsters going to ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Preconsumer Collection : Composting Food Service Scraps at Resort

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Users Forum : Compost Research On Wisconsin Organic Farm

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Hits Home Runs Across Canada

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • BioCycle world

    Composters and organics recyclers are encouraged to lend support to the U.S. Composting Council’s education campaign (See “Composting Council Advocates Carbon Offsets In Climate Change Bill,” BioCycle September 2009) by signing an online petition: http://www.petitiononline.com/uscc2009/petition.html. The Solid Waste Association of North America ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Purchasing: Using Specifications to Expand Markets

    As part of its market development initiatives for urban bulk procurement of organics, the California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB) focused on preparing model specifications to assist purchasing of both compost and mulch. The aim was not to provide a single “best” specification, but to offer a series of “illustrative draft specs,” varying according to end user requirements. In ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • State Of Composting In The U.S.

    The benefits of composting are well documented. Compost is a valuable soil conditioner. It adds needed organic matter, sequesters carbon, improves plant growth, conserves water, reduces reliance on chemical pesticides and fertilizers, and helps prevent nutrient runoff and erosion. Composting also reduces the volume of materials that might otherwise be disposed in landfills or trash incinerators, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Regional Roundup

    NATIONAL PRESS CLUB DIVERTS FOOD WASTEThe National Press Club (NPC) in Washington, D.C. started diverting its pre and postconsumer food waste to composting in September. Working with EnviRelation, an organics hauler, NPC has achieved a 75 percent volume reduction in waste, filling one instead of four 16-cubic foot containers per day with trash. This is expected to equal two tons of food waste ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Expanding Markets with Bagged Products

    Untitled Document When evaluating a move into bagging compost, mulch and blends, production volumes, distribution markets, automation and diversity of bag sizes all need to be ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Markets Grow With Environmental Applications

    The use of compost in various environmental applications is one of the most intensive areas of compost research being pursued today. The high organic matter content and biological activity of compost makes it effective for use in a variety of applications. Five of these will be reviewed in this article: erosion control, revegetation, biofiltration, bioremediation, and wetlands construction. ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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