bird breeding product Articles

  • What’s Happening to the Birds?

    Following in Rachel Carson’s footsteps, a new generation of scientists investigates a new generation of pesticides. Christy Morrissey is driving her white pickup truck along Canada’s endless prairie highway, windows open, listening for birds. She points to the scatter of ponds glinting in the landscape, nestled among fields of canola that stretch as far as the eye ...


    By Ensia

  • Relationships between polybrominated diphenyl ethers, transcription and activity of type 1 deiodinase in a gull highly exposed to flame retardants

    Deca‐brominated diphenyl ether (deca‐BDE) mixture, composed mainly of BDE‐209, is subject to usage restrictions in North America and Europe, although global action on its continued use has yet to be undertaken. Relatively large concentrations of PBDEs, especially BDE‐209 and its higher‐brominated degradation products, have been reported in tissues of ring‐billed gulls (Larus delawarensis) ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 92-year old “Bluebird Man” is the epitome of citizen science in action

    We often think of citizen or crowd-sourced science as a flashy, new function of our modern, inter-connected world. But public participation in research has been happening for much of human history and often involves people of all generations. The documentary “Bluebird Man” features ...


    By Ensia

  • Turning abandoned rice fields into mangroves

    What do you do when mangroves fail to naturally recolonise abandoned rice fields in one of the most precious mangrove deltas of the world? Pieter van Eijk reports on a recent mission to Western Africa that paves the way for large-scale mangrove recovery through a so-called ‘ecological restoration’ approach. ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Impact of Agri-environment measures

    The application of agri-environment contracts concerning 1 farmer in every 7 and delivering environmental services over 20% of European farmland, marks a very significant step towards sustainability. The target set in the 5th Environmental Action Programme of 15% coverage by 2000 has thus already been exceeded. The requirement on Member States to apply the regulation throughout their territories ...

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Welcome to the wild world of rhino conservation

    From fake horns to relocation, today’s wildlife protectors enlist new — and often problematic — strategies to save endangered species. In 1909, after completing his second term as U.S. president, Theodore Roosevelt led an ambitious expedition across east Africa to shoot specimens for America’s most famous ...


    By Ensia

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Time for Trees to Pack Their Trunks?

    As climate changes, forest ecosystems will need to shift to more suitable sites. Should humans lend a helping hand? During the last two springs, contract planters for The Nature Conservancy have spread out through the pine, spruce and aspen forest of northeastern Minnesota. Wielding steel hoedads, they have planted almost 110,000 tree seedlings on public ...


    By Ensia

  • Release of the 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species reveals ongoing decline of the status of plants and animals

    The number of known threatened species reaches 16,119. The ranks of those facing extinction are joined by familiar species like the polar bear, hippopotamus and desert gazelles; together with ocean sharks, freshwater fish and Mediterranean flowers. Positive action has helped the white-tailed eagle and offers a glimmer of hope to Indian vultures. Geneva, Switzerland, 2 May 2006 (IUCN) – The ...

  • A Decade After Asian Tsunami, New Forests Protect the Coast

    The tsunami that struck Indonesia in 2004 obliterated vast areas of Aceh province. But villagers there are using an innovative microcredit scheme to restore mangrove forests and other coastal ecosystems that will serve as a natural barrier against future killer waves and storms. On the day that the Indian Ocean tsunami hit his village a decade ago, fisherman Hajamuddin was at sea. It was ...


    By Wetlands International

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