cereal moisture Articles

  • Light and moisture competition effects on biomass of red clover underseeded to winter wheat

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) use as an underseeded cover crop in winter cereals has declined due to inability of growers to consistently establish uniform stands. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of light and soil moisture competition on underseeded red clover establishment and end of season dry matter production. Field trials were conducted at multiple locations in 2005 ...

  • Nitrate leaching in two irrigated soils with different rates of cattle manure

    Received for publication December 15, 2008. Manure applied to irrigated land may potentially contaminate groundwater with NO3–N. An 8-yr field experiment was conducted in southern Alberta, Canada, to determine the effects of different rates of manure on NO3–N accumulation in two irrigated soil types and NO3–N leaching to shallow groundwater. An annual cereal silage was grown at each site and ...

  • Giant black-grass requires lock stock approach

    Nigel Riches, Arable Technical Specialist for Certis, explains what he’s been seeing in the field. “Black-grass is a problem that in the past has generally been confined to the main arable areas, in the east of the country. “But increasingly we’re seeing this pernicious weed spreading further west each season. Where previously black-grass has not been a big issue in the ...


    By Certis UK

  • Boost grain preservation before production

    Better grain storage would save money and feed over a billion, says Digvir S. Jayas. It deserves more attention. Annually over 2.6 billion tonnes of grains — cereals, oilseeds and pulses — are grown and then stored along the chain from producers to consumers. Most countries do not systematically report how much grain becomes unfit for human consumption during storage, but ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Measuring CO2 to Optimise the Bulk Storage of Food

    Meeting the food requirements of a growing global population is becoming increasingly difficult. Despite the need for additional food, it is estimated that 50-60% of grain is lost after harvesting, at a cost of about $1 trillion per year.1 One of the major reasons for lost grain is spoilage due to mould or insect infestation during storage.2 To provide a ...


    By Edinburgh Instruments Ltd

  • Can superfoods boost the planet’s health, too?

    As demand for African and Asian tree-based superfoods grows, researchers and entrepreneurs eye ways to maximize benefits for the environment. It can seem like new health food fads pop up every week — fads that often fade as quickly as they appear. Two gaining steam lately, though, may be worth a longer look: baobab and moringa. Traditional fare in parts of Africa (and for moringa, ...


    By Ensia

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