chemical plant protection Articles

  • Non-chemical Pre-plant Soil Disinfestation

    The battle with pests, diseases and weeds is an everyday problem for every farmer. Due to the fact that 40% of the world’s food production is lost due to pests and diseases, farmers need to manage crop protection. An excellent example of the need for pesticides is cotton. It is a crop that is affected by various pests. Cotton farming accounts for more than 25% of all insecticides and 12% of ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Can medicinal plants alleviate poverty and protect Nepal’s fragile environment?

    Farmers in the high Himalayas partner with a U.S.–based nonprofit to cultivate medicinal plants — and the environmental and economic benefits they offer. On a trip to their childhood home in eastern Nepal in the early 2000s, Nepalese staff members of the Mountain Institute — an organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., that works to protect mountain environments ...


    By Ensia

  • Possibilities for Future EC Environmental Policy on Plant Protection Products

    Abstract This report presents the results of a study to examine and evaluate the economic, environmental and social benefits of plant protection products (PPPs) in agriculture with the main emphasis on the economic aspects. The approach followed was to carry out four case studies - each covering a single crop in a specific region of major production-comparing standard, integrated and organic ...

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • On-time Pest Protection

    Farming can be a beautiful job under an open sky. But sometimes that ”open sky” determines the flow of farming, total yield, and productivity according to the weather (rain, drought, hail, frost). Since the weather is a major factor in farming, farmers need to manage certain practices to protect their crops from bad weather conditions as well as from various insects and diseases ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Are acute and chronic saltwater fish studies required for plant protection and biocidal product active substance risk assessment?

    The acute and chronic toxicity of chemicals to fish is routinely assessed by using fish acute and early life stage (ELS) test results, usually with freshwater species. However, under some regulations with certain substances, data on saltwater species may also be required. Evidence from earlier studies suggests that saltwater fish species are generally no more sensitive than freshwater species, ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • An evaluation of fish early life stage tests for predicting reproductive and longer term toxicity from plant protection product active substances

    The chronic toxicity of chemicals to fish is routinely assessed by using fish early life stage (ELS) test results. Fish full lifecycle (FLC) tests are generally only required when toxicity, bioaccumulation, and persistence triggers are met, or when there is a suspicion of potential endocrine disrupting properties. This regulatory approach is based on a relationship between the results of fish ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Behavioural and chemical ecology underlying the success of turnip rape (Brassica rapa) trap crops in protecting oilseed rape (Brassica napus) from the pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus)

    There is increasing interest in the use of trap crops as components of integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. Understanding the mechanisms underlying host plant preferences of herbivorous pests can lead to improved effectiveness and reliability of the trap crop. We investigated the behavioural and chemical ecology underlying the success of turnip rape, Brassica rapa, trap crops in ...


    By Springer

  • Cheap chemicals entice caterpillar-eating wasps to crops

    It may be a win-win situation: treating seeds with commercially available growth promoters before planting could have the added benefit of attracting parasitic wasps that feed on caterpillar pests, suggests a study. The protective effect of these cheap, commercially available chemicals, known as ‘plant strengtheners’, can help protect young ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Pesticide plant saved from closure

    Techem is a Mexican pesticide manufacturer dedicated to the production of specialty chemicals for the chemical, agricultural and health industries. Techem sells the chemical industry a diverse range of products including nitrides, chlorides and phosphates, applicable to color tinting and textile manufacture. In the agro-chemical market, Techem sells intermediate phosphates to help protect ...


    By BluePlanet Labs

  • Five Ways to Manage the Soil for Planting

    The soil, as the primary resource for food production and the most important tool for every farmer, is crucial for farming. Successful farming begins with the quality soil, which provides water and essential nutrients to the crops. Rich and healthy soil, combined with the appropriate amount of water and sunlight can significantly contribute to global food production. Proper soil management ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • The Best Practices for Using Plant Residues

    Plant residue are crop materials such as stems, leaves, and roots, that are left on the field after the harvest. In the past, farmers considered crop residue to be trash, that was usually destroyed by fire. However, today this practice is not recommended and highly is not used by farmers. There are two different ways to manage crop residues. The first method is tillage prior planting when plant ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Crop protection 2.0: reducing environmental impact in the EU Is it feasible?

    By 2023 all EU member states must be complying with more stringent guidelines related to Integrated Pest Management (IPM). “The essence of the new guideline is reducing the environmental impact of pesticides,” says Piet Boonekamp, manager of the Bio-interactions and Plant Health business unit at Wageningen UR. “In principle this European goal can be achieved, as has been shown ...

  • The number one thing each of us can do to protect biodiversity

    Reducing our consumption of animal products can go a long way toward conserving endangered habitat around the world. Agriculture expansion is the leading driver of natural habitat loss worldwide. However, most of this growth is not to produce vegetables, fruits or grains to be eaten by people. Ecosystems are destroyed overwhelmingly to feed livestock. Livestock production ...


    By Ensia

  • Implication of microRNA deregulation in the response of vertebrates to endocrine disrupting chemicals

    MicroRNAs are recently discovered small regulatory molecules that control messenger RNA (mRNA) translation in plants and animals and have been implicated in a variety of hormone‐related physiological pathways. Estrogens, thyroid hormones, and gonadotropins all are known to act on miRNA abundance to cause major shifts in cellular activity, physiology, and homeostatic control mechanisms. ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Germination and early plant development of ten plant species exposed to TiO2 and CeO2 nanoparticles

    Ten agronomic plant species were exposed to different concentrations of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) or nano cerium oxide (nCeO2) (0, 250 µg/mL, 500 µg/mL and 1000 µg/mL) to examine potential effects on germination and early seedling development. We modified a standard test protocol developed for soluble chemicals (OPPTS 850.4200) to determine if such an approach might be useful for screening ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Use of plant growth-promoting bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases: Principles, mechanisms of action, and future prospects

    Pathogenic microorganisms affecting plant health are a major and chronic threat to food production and ecosystem stability worldwide. As agricultural production intensified over the past few decades, producers became more and more dependent on agrochemicals as a relatively reliable method of crop protection helping with economic stability of their operations. However, increasing use of chemical ...

  • New animal feed plant relies on proven sera dosing technology

    Top animal feed is a result of the exact application of composition during the production process as well as the use of stateof-the-art technology. The correct planning of the systems engineering is as important as the experience of the staff in the production department. When the Rothkötter animal feed plant was built in Haren-Hüntel, the company relied on sera – a name widely ...


    By sera GmbH

  • Review of existing terrestrial bioaccumulation models and terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling needs for organic chemicals

    Protocols for terrestrial bioaccumulation assessments are far less‐developed than for aquatic systems. This manuscript reviews modeling approaches that can be used to assess the terrestrial bioaccumulation potential of commercial organic chemicals. Models exist for plant, invertebrate, mammal, and avian species and for entire terrestrial food webs, including some that consider spatial factors. ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Accumulation of contaminants of emerging concern in food crops, part two: Plant distribution

    Arid agricultural regions often turn to using treated wastewater (reclaimed water) for irrigation of food crops. Concerns arise, however, when considering the potential for persistent contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) to accumulate into plants intended for human consumption. This work examined the accumulation of a suite of nine CECs into two representative food crops, lettuce and ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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