commercial fish farming Articles

  • Development of Indonesian Fish Farming & Aquaculture Production

    Part 1.Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Part 2.Reasons Why Fishery Industry Develops Fast in Indonesia Part 3.Fish Farm Types in Indonesian Part 4.Sustainable Development of the Fishery in Indonesia Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Fish farming is the ...

  • Spanish Fish Farmer chooses LIT

    Spanish fish farmer chooses LIT-UV Isidro de la Cal is a Spanish group of companies that are active in the fish industry. The company controls the entire process of farming, capturing, processing and finally selling the end product to the stores where consumers buy the various fish products. The fish that is processed by Isidro de la Cal comes from various national, mainly Galician, and ...

  • Shrimp farming: Why prevention is better than medicine

    Disease challenges that have affected a number of key shrimp production regions around the world in recent years have increased the focus on producing healthier and more robust stocks. In addition to establishing very strict sanitary requirements, many shrimp farmers have sought new health-specific diets across the shrimp lifecycle that progress growth and reduce bacterial challenges. Some, ...


    By Skretting - Nutreco Group

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • Hexabromocyclododecane in consumer fish from South China: Implications for human exposure via dietary intake

    Levels of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were determined in 12 consumer fish species from South China. The concentrations of the sum of HBCD diastereoisomers (ΣHBCD) ranged from nondetectable to 194 pg/g wet weight, with a detectable frequency of 70%. This was at the low end of the concentration range globally observed. Carnivorous fish species contained higher HBCD concentrations than herbivorous ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Salmon aquaculture could incorporate seaweed and sea urchins to reduce nitrogen enrichment

    Farming fish together with seaweed and other species could help improve the sustainability of aquaculture and reduce pollution. A new study provides a tool for designing sustainable fish farming systems and calculates their potential to recycle waste. An example of a salmon farming system incorporating seaweed and sea urchins could reduce nitrogen releases to the environment by 45%. Over half of ...

  • Hatchery- Grieg Seafood, Canada

    Installed in November 2004 Scope of supply: Three systems, Photon PMD320K6/10, including automatic quartz cleaning system. Duty/ Standby operation. Challenge: The main target organism is Furunculosis (Ameromonas Salmonicida). Total Flow: 900 m3/h Transmittance: 88% in a 10 mm cell Background The threat of disease is one of greatest dangers to a ...

  • Singapore: red Tilapia spawns profits

    At this research and commercial farm, freshwater red tilapia (Oreochromis , spp.) is a major product, selling live for a premium price. Harvest size is 600 to 700 grams each, following a six month grow-out period. The senior manager reported, 'Operation with AIRE-O2® aerators is quite good and reliable. We are able to sustain good densities of fish in the ponds.' The deputy manager also reported ...

  • Composting In rural Alaska

    Gardeners, communities and commercial enterprises have proven that composting works in Alaska, especially given large quantities of fish waste and diminishing landfill capacity. ALASKA is two and a half times larger than the largest state in the lower 48 states. Over half of the entire state’s population lives within the municipality of Anchorage. Many Alaskan villages can only be reached ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Seasteading could be the answer to sustainably feeding 9 billion people

    Self-sufficient nation states in the middle of the ocean might be our ticket to a sustainable future. Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth’s surface, yet provide less than 2 percent of the food we eat. The growing demand for seafood, however — predicted to rise to 8 percent during the next decade — from an already depleted and exhausted ocean is forcing ...


    By Ensia

  • Green catering tips

    It's that time of the year again - party time. Whether it's St Patrick's Day, Easter, birthdays, Christmas, weddings, Thanksgiving, Halloween or Hanukkah, we all enjoy letting our hair down and having fun with friends and family! And with these events, come the mountains of munch-ables - tasty treats of every shape, colour and ingredient. But how green is our spinach really, and should we be ...


    By green24

  • Mangrove coasts: a muddy story (Part 3)

    In my first blog, I introduced the term “ecosystem services”, which has become a popular way to refer to the value of ecosystems. This is an important concept as it provides a counter-argument to the often narrow-minded and short-eyed approach of ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Future Brief: Sustainable Aquaculture

    Is sustainable aquaculture possible? Aquaculture is facing a new era of expansion in Europe. What are the environmental implications of this, and how can the sector expand sustainably? This Future Brief from Science for Environment Policy presents an overview of research into aquaculture’s impacts, and considers how it could develop in harmony with environmental goals. The ...


    By European Commission

  • Top trends conservationists should be paying attention to — but aren’t

    Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. ...


    By Ensia

  • Landfill Ban Stimulates Composting Programs in Nova Scotia

    On the East coast of Canada and almost completely surrounded by water, Nova Scotia is connected to the North American continent by only a small strip of land. While not large in population (935,000), the province has a large rural sector. Halifax, the capital city, has a population of 359,000. The second largest municipality, Cape Breton Regional Municipality, has a population of about 120,000. ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Vineyards Make Switch to "Four Course" Compost

    Untitled Document FORGET about the Grapes of Wrath. There's a new story in California: ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Advances in Oregon and Washington

    Over the years, different forces have served as drivers to help grow the composting industry. For example, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was the perceived landfill crisis that led to state bans on disposal of yard trimmings. Composting also has benefitted from a push to meet recycling goals, which has prompted states and local governments to go beyond yard trimmings and into such ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Soy entering valuable wetlands of the Paraná Delta, Argentina

    Due to the enormous emphasis on soybean cultivation within Argentina, activities such as cattle raising but also the cultivation of soybeans are increasingly pushed to more marginal and vulnerable areas, where the cost of land is lower. The Paraná Delta, one of the most unique and important wetlands regions in the world, is one of these places. Although the region is not ...


    By Wetlands International

  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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