conventional plow Articles

  • Economic performance of alternative tillage systems in the northern corn belt

    While no-till (NT) cropping systems can provide conservation benefits in the northern Corn Belt, adoption has been low due to concerns about potential yield reductions and economic risk. Strip-tillage (ST) systems have been proposed as an alternative that may provide many of the conservation benefits of NT while maintaining productivity and economic returns. The objectives of this study were to ...

  • Nitrogen, tillage, and crop rotation effects on carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from irrigated cropping systems

    Received for publication December 15, 2008. Long-term effects of tillage intensity, N fertilization, and crop rotation on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) flux from semiarid irrigated soils are poorly understood. We evaluated effects of: (i) tillage intensity [no-till (NT) and conventional moldboard plow tillage (CT)] in a continuous corn rotation; (ii) N fertilization levels [0–246 kg N ...

  • Tillage and fertilizer effects on yield, profitability, and risk in a corn-wheat-potato-wheat rotation

    Reduced tillage results in lower production costs and thus may have economic advantages for farmers. However, yield penalties, specific yield risks, or higher nutrient requirements may counteract the positive effects of reduced tillage. This study investigates long-term tillage effects (moldboard plow, and deep and shallow chisel plow) and their interactions with N fertilizer input on yields and ...

  • Kentucky - Golf Homes Development case study

    Site: County Club Golf Homes Location: Elizabethtown Kentucky The Country Club Golf Homes (CCGH) located in Elizabethtown, Kentucky is a shining example of how technology, engineering, and land development can come together to make unsuitable land suitable for onsite wastewater dispersal. In late 2001, the CCGH developers required ...


    By Quanics Incorporated

  • The oil intensity of food

    Today we are an oil-based civilization, one that is totally dependent on a resource whose production will soon be falling. Since 1981, the quantity of oil extracted has exceeded new discoveries by an ever-widening margin. In 2008, the world pumped 31 billion barrels of oil but discovered fewer than 9 billion barrels of new oil. World reserves of conventional oil are in a free fall, dropping every ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Agroecology can help fix our broken food system. Here’s how.

    The various incarnations of the sustainable food movement need a science with which to approach a system as complex as food and farming. This story was co-published with Food Tank, a nonprofit organization focused on building a global community for safe, healthy, nourished eaters. Thumb through U.S. newspapers any day in early 2015, and you could find stories on ...


    By Ensia

  • Dozens of U.S. Cities Board the Bike-Sharing Bandwagon

    When New York City opened registration for its much anticipated public bike-sharing program on April 15, 2013, more than 5,000 people signed up within 30 hours. Eager for access to a fleet of thousands of bicycles, they became Citi Bike members weeks before bikes were expected to be available. Such pent-up demand for more cycling options is on display in cities across the United States—from ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

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