corn stress Articles

  • Controlling Barnyardgrass with Corn Hybrid Selection

    Barnyardgrass is a summer annual grass weed with a global impact on corn production.  Yield losses due to barnyardgrass competition have been estimated up to 45% or more for crops such as cotton and corn. Besides corn, it can also be a serious weed pest in rice, soybean, sugarbeet, cotton, and corn. Integrated weed management techniques can be used for control of barnyardgrass in corn. High ...

  • Evaluation of in-season Nitrogen management strategies for corn production

    Nitrogen is an important and costly input for corn (Zea mays L.) production. With rising prices and environmental concerns, producers are looking for ways to better manage N fertilization. A project designed to evaluate in-season N management strategies for adjusting N rate was conducted in 30 Iowa cornfields from 2004 to 2006. Nitrogen rates applied preplant or early sidedress (PRE-N) and corn ...

  • Grain sorghum and corn comparisons: yield, economic, and environmental responses

    Grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is often grown where water stress is expected. But, improved drought tolerance in corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids has resulted in increased dryland corn production in preference to grain sorghum. However, grain sorghum may still have a yield advantage over corn in drought prone environments. This study was conducted to determine if grain sorghum has either a ...

  • Yield and water use response of cuphea to irrigation in the Northern Corn belt

    Cuphea (Cuphea viscosissima Jacq. x C. lanceolata W.T. Aiton) may be prone to drought stress, yet little is known about the yield response of this new oilseed crop to irrigation. A field study was conducted in western Minnesota on a Barnes loam soil (fine-loamy, mixed, superactive, frigid Calcic Hapludolls) in 2002 and 2003 to compare yield and water use of irrigated and nonirrigated cuphea. ...

  • Corn response to competition: growth alteration vs. yield limiting factors

    Competition mechanisms among adjacent plants are not well understood. This study compared corn growth and yield responses to water, N, and shade at 74,500 plants ha–1 (1x) with responses to water and N when planted at 149,000 plant ha–1. Plant biomass, leaf area, chlorophyll content, reflectance, and enzyme expression (transcriptome analysis) were measured at V-12. Grain and stover yields were ...

  • Response of bt and near-isoline corn hybrids to plant density

    Transgenic Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids with resistance to corn rootworm (CRW; Diabrotica spp.) or European corn borer [ECB; Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner)] can have greater tolerance to water and nutrient stress, and thus may have higher optimum plant densities. Experiments were conducted following soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] over nine site-years in Illinois to ...

  • Critical nitrogen curve and nitrogen nutrition index for corn in eastern canada

    Plant-based diagnostic methods of N nutrition require the critical N concentration (Nc) to be defined, that is the minimum N concentration necessary to achieve maximum growth. A critical N curve (Nc = 34.0W–0.37 with W being shoot biomass in Mg DM ha–1), based on whole plant N concentration, was determined for corn (Zea mays L.) in France. Our objectives were to validate this critical N curve in ...

  • Planting date and cultivar effects on grain yield in dryland corn production

    Corn (Zea mays L.) production is gradually spreading into the Sudan savanna zone of West Africa where production is limited by erratic and inadequate rainfall. To increase corn production, production practices should be properly designed to minimize the effects of low precipitation and high temperatures that characterize the zone. A study, to determine the performance of late (120 d), early (90 ...

  • Impact of planting date and hybrid on early growth of sweet corn

    Sweet corn (Zea mays L. var. rugosa) is a warm-weather crop that is grown in most of the United States. Normally, it is planted over an extended planting window to provide a continuous supply for the fresh market. However, this planting window exposes the crop to various stresses and weather risks. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of planting date on early growth of sweet ...

  • Do synergistic relationships between nitrogen and water influence the ability of corn to use nitrogen derived from fertilizer and soil?

    To improve site-specific N recommendations a more complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for synergistic relationships between N and water is needed. The objective of this research was to determine the influence of soil water regime on the ability of corn (Zea mays L.) to use N derived from fertilizer and soil. A randomized split-block experiment was conducted in 2002, 2003, and ...

  • Heterosis decreasing in hybrids: Yield test inbreds

    Yield testing finished inbreds to replace preliminary single-cross corn (Zea mays L.) yield tests will increase rate of commercial hybrid yield gains. Studies have shown that heterosis decreased 25%/50 yr, 10%/60 yr, and 35%/100 yr. Natural selection and artificial selection by plant breeders for adaptedness have increased parental inbred and hybrid seed yields, whereas percentage heterosis ...

  • Can genetic engineering help quench crops’ thirst?

    Researchers around the world are exploring how GMO technology might boost food production under hot, dry conditions. Roger Deal is trying to figure out how plants remember drought. An assistant professor of biochemistry and genetics at Emory University, Deal says most plants have a kind of memory for stress. When experiencing water shortage, for example, plants close ...


    By Ensia

  • Composting Livestock Mortalities

    Performance, composting methods, environmental impacts and biosecurity of the process are evaluated for emergency disposal of cattle by research team at Iowa State University. A THREE-YEAR study was commissioned by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to evaluate the practical feasibility, performance, environmental impacts and biosecurity of using composting for emergency disposal - should a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Chicago Council lists three-decade changes in greenhouse gases and average temperature

    In 2011, we wrote a column, “Global warming is happening: How should farmers respond?” (http://agpolicy.org/weekcol/549.html). In that column we began by saying, “There was a time when one could legitimately argue that there was a lack of scientific agreement over the issue of the role of humans in global warming and even whether we were in a ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    “In early 2008, Saudi Arabia announced that, after being self-sufficient in wheat for over 20 years, the non-replenishable aquifer it had been pumping for irrigation was largely depleted,” writes Lester R. Brown in his new book, Plan B 4.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization (W.W. Norton & Company). “In response, officials said they would reduce their wheat harvest by one eighth each year ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • What’s Happening to the Birds?

    Following in Rachel Carson’s footsteps, a new generation of scientists investigates a new generation of pesticides. Christy Morrissey is driving her white pickup truck along Canada’s endless prairie highway, windows open, listening for birds. She points to the scatter of ponds glinting in the landscape, nestled among fields of canola that stretch as far as the eye ...


    By Ensia

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • A New Generation of GMOs

    Is synthetic biology on its way to our farms, markets and tables? Thousands of researchers will descend on Boston this fall for an event billed as the world’s largest gathering of synthetic biologists. The field is evolving so rapidly that even scientists working in it  ...


    By Ensia

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