cotton farmer Articles

  • Impact of Bt cotton on farmer livelihoods in South Africa

    The economic benefits of Genetically Modified (GM) crops in developing countries have been well documented, but little research has been undertaken to date on the impacts of GM adoption on household livelihoods. The research reported here aimed to assess the livelihood impacts of the adoption of Bt cotton in South Africa., and involved 100 interviews of resource-poor farmers growing Bt cotton in ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Bt-cotton and secondary pests

    Bt-cotton seed has been effective to control the damage of bollworm in Chinese cotton production since 1999, reducing the need for pesticides and increasing incomes of Chinese farmers. Field data collected in 2004 indicates that these benefits have been eroded by increasing the use of pesticides aimed to control secondary pests. The combination of Bt-cotton seed and other forms of biological pest ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Bt-cotton and production risk: panel data estimates

    The farm-level success of Bt-cotton in developing countries is well documented. However, the literature has only recently begun to recognise the importance of accounting for the effects of the technology on production risk, in addition to the mean effect estimated by previous studies. The risk effects of the technology are likely very important to smallholder farmers in the developing world due ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Bt-cotton boosts the gross margin of small-scale cotton producers in South Africa

    This paper explores some of the issues involved in the Genetic Modification (GM) debate by focusing on one crop that has been modified for pest resistance, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), and commercially released to small-scale farmers in the Makhathini Flats, KwaZulu Natal, the Republic of South Africa. This was the first commercial release of a GM variety (Bt-cotton) in Sub-Saharan Africa, and ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Comparing conventional and certified organic cotton supply chains: the case of Mali

    The certified organic cotton supply chain is compared to the conventional cotton supply chain in Mali. The most important differences between the two supply chains are highlighted in this study. Switching to organic production may offer a range of potential advantages to cotton farmers, including lower expenses for farm inputs, healthier soils, diverse sources of income, and higher prices. A ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • GM cotton and its possible contributions to environmental sustainability and rural development in Turkey

    Cotton farming in Turkey faces economic, environmental and socioeconomic challenges. Organic cotton has been a successful response that greatly benefited low-input farmers; but, worldwide, it will eventually become a mature niche market with limited growth potential. Since no Genetically Modified (GM) varieties have been approved so far in Turkey, we want to find out how the potential adoption of ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Farmers fine-tune research, spread their own innovations

    Smallholder farmers can aid the uptake of research fruits and drive grassroots innovations. Joel Winston reports. The 1960s' Green Revolution demonstrated how technological innovations can transform agriculture. High-yielding crop strains, irrigation, fertilisers and pesticides were brought into developing countries, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Can bats reduce nut farmers’ pesticide use?

    Ecologist Katherine Ingram is on a quest to quantify the economic value of insect-eating bats in walnut groves. For the past three years, Katherine Ingram has had a most unusual summer job: catching bats and studying their droppings to see what they eat. A doctoral student in ecology at the University of California, Davis, Ingram is exploring the role bats can play as winged ...


    By Ensia

  • Perceptions and practices of farmers towards the salinity problem: the case of Harran Plain, Turkey

    The Harran region, located in the South-eastern part of Turkey, is facing an increasing salinity problem due to excessive and inefficient irrigation practices. In this paper, we survey 619 cotton producers in the region and analyse their perceptions and practices towards soil salinity. The survey results indicate that formal education and training are the central factors that determine the ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • New tools and farmer training could revolutionize pesticide management in West Africa

    Field schools that train farmers in alternative methods of pest control have succeeded in nearly eliminating the use of toxic pesticides by a community of cotton growers in Mali, according to a new FAO study published today by the London-based Royal Society. The study was conducted in two areas - the Bla ...

  • Farmers banded together to tackle early price and income problems

    Few weeks ago in this column we looked at the earliest agricultural policies that were put in place by the European settlers and their descendants in what is now the United States. For the most part, though not exclusively, the policies can best be described as developmental policies because they 1) increase the supply of inputs, 2) decrease the cost of inputs, or 3) improve the quality of ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • The lack of clear GMO regulation: its impact on researchers and farmers in Brazil

    This paper discusses the current regulation of genetically modified organisms and derivatives used in Brazil, where GM-plants are on the verge of being approved for commercial use. The paper further uses a simulation model to assess the potential economic benefits resulting from unrestricted commercial approval of herbicide-tolerant soybeans and some other crops on the Brazilian economy. Only ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • From Stygian Blackness to Community Asset: A History of the Trinity River

    There have been three periods of permanent human occupation of the Upper Trinity River basin. For most of the last 11,000 years only Native Americans have lived here. These first citizens hunted, fished and lived with nature … they made no substantive changes to the land or water resources … and they thought it would always be that way.The colonists began arriving in the mid-1800’s. They soon ...

  • Indian government still ‘flip flopping’ on GM trials

    In August, India’s ruling nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) stopped its legislators from accepting Monsanto sponsorship to attend a farm exhibition in the US state of Iowa. On the surface this might seem strange: attending the Farm Progress Show should be innocuous, as Monsanto routinely takes farmers, industry experts, media and MPs from various countries to visit the show and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Non-chemical Pre-plant Soil Disinfestation

    The battle with pests, diseases and weeds is an everyday problem for every farmer. Due to the fact that 40% of the world’s food production is lost due to pests and diseases, farmers need to manage crop protection. An excellent example of the need for pesticides is cotton. It is a crop that is affected by various pests. Cotton farming accounts for more than 25% of all insecticides and 12% of ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • The problems with the arguments against GM crops

    New evidence shows that arguments against GM crops are unfounded, says Margaret Karembu. The year 2013 marked the 18th consecutive year of commercial cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or now commonly referred to as biotech crops. And in just under two decades, the volume of ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Asia–Pacific Analysis: Plan for growth in biotech crops

    South-East Asian nations should follow the Philippines down the path to biotech crops for food security, argues Crispin Maslog. Since biotechnology-derived crops were introduced in 1996, they have been adopted at an unprecedented rate, according to the 2011 annual report of the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) released earlier this year. ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • The developing world is awash in pesticides. Does it have to be?

    Herbicides, insecticides and fungicides threaten the environment and human health in many parts of the world. But research is pointing to a better approach. In today’s globalized world, it is not inconceivable that one might drink coffee from Colombia in the morning, munch cashews from Vietnam for lunch and gobble grains from Ethiopia for dinner. That we can enjoy these ...


    By Ensia

  • Composting Feedlot Manure

    Situated in the Texas panhandle is an area known as the Rolling Plains ecological region, a topography consisting primarily of open-range pasture and cropland. Approximately one-third of the Rolling Plains region is dedicated to production agriculture, where huge fields of wheat, cotton and sorghum extend into the distance for as far as the eye can see. The remaining area is native grassland, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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