cover crop planting Articles

  • Corn belt assessment of cover crop management and preferences

    Surveying end-users about their use of technologies and preferences provides information for researchers and educators to develop relevant research and educational programs. A mail survey was sent to Corn Belt farmers during 2006 to quantify cover crop management and preferences. Results indicated that the dominant cereal cover crops in Indiana and Illinois are winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) ...

  • 2020 Planting Prep: How Hydraulic Downforce Can Help

    What conditions will you face during spring planting? With 2019’s extreme weather patterns, what comes next is anyone’s guess. That’s why it’s smart to prepare now. Planting into wet soil is completely different from planting into dry, compacted soil. Yet the fundamental challenge is the same—putting seeds in the right place, at the right time, and at the right depth ...


    By Ag Leader Technology

  • Benefits of minimum tillage case study

    In Hungary, the MARGINS project is being conducted near Lake Balaton - the largest lake in Central Europe. The lake is renowned for its beauty and wildlife. Its surrounding hilly landscape is covered with rich brown forest soil. This landscape is, however, prone to soil erosion -in particular, rills develop when soil is weakened by excessive tillage and exposed to intense rainstorms. If not ...


    By Syngenta

  • Self-seeded cereal cover crop effects on interspecific competition with corn

    Perpetuating cereal cover crops through self-seeding may increase adoption by reducing risk and cost. Winter rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack) were used to develop self-seeding cover crop systems in a soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]–corn (Zea mays L.) rotation. Cereal cover crops were planted in varying row spacing configurations and ...

  • Conservation: It’s the right thing to do

    A fable of six blind men and an elephant originated centuries ago somewhere on the Indian continent. In it the blind men try to identify an elephant by touching only one part. According to the fable each man came to a different conclusion as to what the elephant was. The parable illustrates that though opinions may vary, there’s some truth to be found in all of them. That’s the way it ...


    By National Farmers Union (NFU)

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union (NFU)

  • Brassica cover crops for Nitrogen retention in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain

    Received for publication February 5, 2008. Brassica cover crops are new to the mid-Atlantic region, and limited information is available on their N uptake capabilities for effective N conservation. Forage radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Daikon), oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Adagio), and rape (Brassica napus L. cv. Dwarf Essex) were compared with rye (Secale cereale L. cv. Wheeler), a ...

  • Seeding rate and planting arrangement effects on growth and weed suppression of a legume-oat cover crop for organic vegetable systems

    Winter cover crops can add soil organic matter, improve nutrient cycling, and suppress weeds in organic vegetable systems. A 2-yr study was conducted on organic farms in Salinas and Hollister, CA, to evaluate the effect of seeding rate (SR) and planting arrangement on cover crop density, ground cover, and cover crop and weed dry matter (DM) with a mixed cover crop. The mix contained legumes (35% ...

  • Harvesting Corn Stover and Soil Quality

    Corn stover, left in fields after corn grain harvest, has been identified as a potential feedstock to help supply biofuel needed to offset a portion of the 14 million barrels of oils consumed daily by the U.S. transportation sector. It was projected to supply 256 million tons of the 1.4 billion tons of biomass (232 million Mg out of 1.3 billion Mg) estimated to be available each year. Corn stover ...

  • Indigo’s partnership with Anheuser-Busch: a major step towards beneficial agriculture

    The agriculture industry is currently one of the biggest contributors to human caused greenhouse gas emissions, but I believe that it is also one of the most hopeful solutions for slowing and reversing climate change. Agricultural crops have the potential to remove CO2 from the atmosphere and sequester it in the soil, and the sheer size of the ag industry makes this approach one of the only ...


    By Indigo Ag, Inc

  • Hit the Spring Planting Target with Hydraulic Down Force

    Will Hutchinson enjoys a good challenge, especially when it comes to improving production on his row crop, wheat and alfalfa farm near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. So when he saw the opportunity to leverage Ag Leader’s Hydraulic Down Force system to prevent a common problem and improve his planting operations on acres where he plants cover crops, he jumped at the chance. Two years later, ...


    By Ag Leader Technology

  • Let’s stop treating our soil like dirt

    One of the most underappreciated resources on our planet, soil does much more than grow crops The United Nations’ International Year of Soils is hardly a media darling. Maybe it’s because many people are like me, who recall Mom’s words: “Take off your shoes! Don’t bring dirt ...


    By Ensia

  • Control of cereal rye with a roller/crimper as influenced by cover crop phenology

    Adoption of reduced tillage practices have been driven by the need to enhance soil quality, minimize field labor time, and scale up farm size. However, concerns about increased reliance on herbicides and demand for organically grown foods call for adoption of production practices that can reduce both tillage and herbicide use. This research study assessed the influence of planting and termination ...

  • Nitrogen Fixers

    Here’s a bit of geeky plant science. On this image of the roots of white clover, you can plainly see bumps along the roots that are called nodules. Over millions of years, the plant has evolved a symbiotic relationship with certain species of soil-dwelling bacteria called Rhizobia. This group of bacteria has the ability to take nitrogen from the atmosphere and “fix” it by ...


    By West Coast Seeds

  • Effect of seeding rate and planting arrangement on rye cover crop and weed growth

    Weed growth in winter cover crops in warm climates may contribute to weed management costs in subsequent crops. A 2-yr experiment was conducted on an organic vegetable farm in Salinas, California, to determine the impact of seeding rate and planting arrangement on rye (Secale cereale L. ‘Merced’) cover crop growth and weed suppression. Each year, rye was planted in October at three rates (90, ...

  • Nitrogen contribution from red clover for corn following wheat in western Ohio

    Inclusion of a winter legume cover crop into a crop rotation has been suggested as a method to provide a substantial portion of the N requirement of the following crop. While the benefits of winter cover crops such as reduced soil erosion, increased soil organic matter, and increased mulch cover have been well documented, the N contribution to the subsequent crop has shown to be variable. The ...

  • Moving Up the Food Chain

    For most of the time that human beings have walked the earth, we lived as hunter-gatherers. The share of the human diet that came from hunting versus gathering varied with geographic location, hunting skills, and the season of the year. During the northern hemisphere winter, for instance, when there was little food to gather, people there depended heavily on hunting for survival. Our long history ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Establishment and growth of self-seeded winter cereal cover crops in a soybean–corn rotation

    Perpetuating cereal cover crops through self-seeding may increase adoption by reducing risk and cost. Winter rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack) were used to develop self-seeding cover crop systems in a soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]–corn (Zea mays L.) rotation. Cereals were planted and managed chemically and mechanically in varying ...

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