cow handling Articles

  • Himmerland dairy farm case study

    A. PRE-TREATMENT Barn Type: 60 tie stall dairy barn. Mats used in stalls. Manure Handling: Barn houses about 17 – 20 cows along each of two 120 foot parallel pits 2.5 feet wide and 5 to 9 feet deep (stepped). The pits gravity drain to the center of the pit and then flow out to an outside manure storage pit via 2.5 foot square pipe. Half of south gutter is used to handle parlour wash. ...


    By Nordevco Associates Ltd.

  • Reuse of dairy lagoon wastewater through SDI in forage crops

    Abstract California has become the leading dairy products producing state in the USA. This has resulted in farms commonly milking several thousand cows per day. The care and feeding of the animals has produced large waste streams commonly collected and stored in lagoons. Environmentally safe handling and reuse of the lagooned wastewater is the objective of this study. A system of ...


    By Geoflow, Inc.

  • Huxley hutterite brethren colony case study

    A. Farm Description Barn Type: 80 stall free stall barn with saw dust on floor. Manure Handling: Barn houses 80 cows over 8 pits, each 7 feet deep and 12 feet wide. Manure is stored under the slatted floor for 6 months and then agitated and pumped out. B. The Problems: As the pits are pumped ammonia levels rise significantly resulting in problems for barn staff ...


    By Nordevco Associates Ltd.

  • Composting Food Residuals on the Farm

    A county agency and a farmer in Vermont have teamed up to collect and compost food residuals and other organics. The Rutland County Solid Waste District (RCSWD), which is responsible for managing MSW for 16 cities and towns, began planning the food residuals composting program in December, 1996 with the Rutland Natural Resource Conservation District, one of 14 districts in Vermont that promotes ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Anaerobic Digestion at Dairy Farms

    The need to upgrade dairy waste management practices to overcome pollution problems is leading more farmers to seek solutions with anaerobic digestion technology. Two recent examples of this trend are underway at California sites. The Cal Poly Dairy is located adjacent to the California Polytechnic State University campus in San Luis Obispo. The dairy milks 180 cows with a total population of ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Latest Progress in Anaerobic Digestion

    Compared to countries like Germany and Denmark, the United States and Canada have a long way to go in creating the fundamental policy incentives and regulatory mandates that will encourage market development for anaerobic digestion (AD). Someone recently asked me how many years it would take to deploy AD systems on farms in North America that are large enough to economically use them. Given ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Beef Farmer Spring 2017 `Trace elements are key to growth rates`

    Iodine has a direct impact on growth rates as it is incorporated into the thyroid hormones which control metabolism, promoting efficient live weight gain. Annie Williams, Animal Scientist with Agrimin says that many beef units fall short on achieving optimum growth rates because animals do not receive adequate levels of trace elements at grass. She says that with increased feed costs, many ...


    By Agrimin Limited

  • Digester Developer Taps Natural Gas Markets

    IN the late 1990s, Dan Eastman and two colleagues were researching business opportunities in the renewable energy industry. They were looking for a commercially viable technology that could take renewable energy from an experimental phase to a solid business investment. In 1999, Eastman and his partners founded Microgy, Inc., with its base in Wisconsin. The company licensed the Xergi anaerobic ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Public/private partnering facilitates organics diversion

    Windham Solid Waste Management District (WSWMD) provides recycling services to 19 towns in the southeast corner of Vermont, serving a population base of 37,000, plus a significant number of second home residents, as well as tourists. Based in Brattleboro, WSWMD operates drop-off recycling at 22 locations, with materials processed at a dual stream materials recovery facility (MRF) owned and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • How farm policy used to work

    In the period between the 1930s and 1992, farm bills generally instituted compensation policies that took the form of price supports. These policies were designed to manage the surplus production that resulted from centuries of developmental policies while allowing U.S. farmers the chance, with hard work and good management skills, to provide their family with a livelihood. Compensation policies ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Trimming costs with Composting

    Weis Markets, Inc. has an interest in diverting organics from its grocery stores as part of its overall sustainability goals, but to bring an individual store onto the program is always decided by the economics. “It has to balance out,” says Ginny Frederick, Facilities Manager for Weis Markets. “If it costs too much at a particular location, or the store doesn’t generate ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • What’s Best For Long Grass – A Topper Or A Flail Mower?

    After a few spring showers all of a sudden our pastures and meadows are becoming jungles as the grass shoots up overnight. If you’re in the market for a mower to attach to your compact tractor or quad bike, there are lots to choose from. Perhaps too much… With the bewildering range of different mowers available, what’s best for your needs? ...


    By Farm Tech Supplies Ltd.

  • Compost integral in new website in building soil

    A website called “BuildingSoil” has been launched by the Washington Organic Recycling Council to help builders preserve healthy soil on building sites. It's the latest Soils for Salmon project which aims to change standard site development practices. These new “soil best management practices” will soon be required by local governments around western Washington, as they update local codes to ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Users Forum : Compost Research On Wisconsin Organic Farm

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Preconsumer Collection : Composting Food Service Scraps at Resort

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost science journal of advocacy and foresight

    SEVERAL months ago, I started on a journey through the pages of Compost Science, beginning with the Spring, 1960 inaugural issue. I was confident that I could whip through the articles and news items in the several hundred issues of the magazine between 1960 and 2009, and be prepared to write this article for BioCycle’s 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition. Granted, there were interruptions, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

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