crop from deterioration Articles

  • Crop gene banks are preserving the future of agriculture. But who’s preserving them?

    As climate change makes crop diversity even more important, gene banks struggle to stay afloat. During the past few years of civil war in Syria, rebel fighters have destroyed Shia mosques and Christian graves, and burned and looted Christian churches while the Islamic State group has demolished priceless artifacts in the region. Nothing seemed sacred to the disparate ...


    By Ensia

  • Learning from past civilizations

    To understand our current environmental dilemma, it helps to look at earlier civilizations that also got into environmental trouble. Our early twenty-first century civilization is not the first to face the prospect of environmentally induced economic decline. The question is how we will respond. As Jared Diamond points out in his book Collapse, some of the early societies that were in ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • No easy transition

    In September 2007, the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in Laguna, the Philippines, brought together some 41 experts from agricultural research institutes from around the world for three days. They were brought together by the realization that biofuel production had doubled in the previous five years and was likely to double in the next five. While the US and Brazil produced 90% of ...

  • Carbon fiber on the DELTA FORCE boom range

    Lower weight gives a more stable boom Carbon fiber helps the boom in many areas, primarily due to the low weight and the stiffness of the material which is one of its most distinguished strengths. The lower weight means that the center part gets fewer strengths to be controlled when the boom must be precisely controlled above the crop on rough ground. It is not much use to have a ...


    By Hardi International A/S

  • The Nature of the New World

    We recently entered a new century, but we are also entering a new world, one where the collisions between our demands and the earth’s capacity to satisfy them are becoming daily events. It may be another crop-withering heat wave, another village abandoned because of invading sand dunes, or another aquifer pumped dry. If we do not act quickly to reverse the trends, these seemingly isolated events ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • How good is GLASOD?

    The Global Assessment of Soil Degradation (GLASOD), commissioned 20 years ago by the UN Environment Program (Oldeman et al., 1991), collated expert judgments of many soil scientists to produce a world map of human-induced soil degradation. It has been an important source for national and international environmental policy decisions but has been criticized on the grounds that its qualitative ...

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • When population growth and resource availability collide

    As land and water become scarce, competition for these vital resources intensifies within societies, particularly between the wealthy and those who are poor and dispossessed. The shrinkage of life-supporting resources per person that comes with population growth is threatening to drop the living standards of millions of people below the survival level, leading to potentially unmanageable social ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • A civilizational tipping point

    In recent years there has been a growing concern over thresholds or tipping points in nature. For example, scientists worry about when the shrinking population of an endangered species will fall to a point from which it cannot recover. Marine biologists are concerned about the point where overfishing will trigger the collapse of a fishery. We know there were social tipping points in earlier ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • How Much Will it Cost to Save Our Economy’s Foundation?

    During the past two summers, Pakistan was hit with catastrophic floods. The record flooding in the late summer of 2010 was the most devastating natural disaster in Pakistan’s history. The media coverage reported torrential rains as the cause, but there is much more to the story. When Pakistan was created in 1947, some 30 percent of the landscape was covered by forests. Now it is 4 percent. ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Analysis of Selected Herbicides And Related Metabolites in a Coastal Lagoon Under The Influence of Water Runoff: Sediment and Biota

    Coastal lagoons are subjected to strong anthropogenic pressures as a consequence of their location between Land and Sea. Among other contaminants, they are receiving high nutrient loadings and pesticides, mainly of agricultural origin, from heavily exploited watersheds. Since the number of chemicals released into the water systems is high, there is a need to classify them and the associated risk, ...


  • How a new way of thinking about soil sparked a national movement in agriculture

    For three weeks every month, Ray Archuleta captivates audiences with a few handfuls of soil. He begins with two clumps, dropping them into water. The soil from a farm where the soil isn’t tilled holds together, while the tilled soil immediately disperses, indicating poor soil structure. Next, volunteers from the audience — mostly farmers and ranchers — pour water over a soil ...


    By Ensia

  • Need for national soil policies for developing countries - some facts

    As a soil scientist working for more than 25 years, I am very much concerned with soil protection and conservation. In this process, I started collecting information related to national soil policies of different countries. To my surprise I could not get a well defined national soil policy for any one of the developing country? A developing country can be defined as , that country which has a ...

  • Agroecology can help fix our broken food system. Here’s how.

    The various incarnations of the sustainable food movement need a science with which to approach a system as complex as food and farming. This story was co-published with Food Tank, a nonprofit organization focused on building a global community for safe, healthy, nourished eaters. Thumb through U.S. newspapers any day in early 2015, and you could find stories on ...


    By Ensia

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

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