crop growing Articles

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Keyhole Gardens; Positive Impact on Food Security

    World hunger is a constant problem. It has been one of the most widely discussed topics in recent years. Rapidly increasing global population, limited natural resources, and climatic changes, has resulted in the need for a sustainable increase in food production. Scientists, governments, and organizations across the world are working together to bring innovations and good farming practices which ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Fruitful results from a true IPM approach

    Paul Roberts, co-founder and partner of Ashdown Nursery, established nearly 30 years ago, grows approximately 160,000 strawberry plants for co-operative, Berry Gardens, in greenhouses covering 1.6 hectares. “This year, we’ve had to deal with a significant increase in the number of spidermite, thrips and whitefly,” explains Mr Roberts. “Over the years, I have used a ...


    By Certis UK

  • How to Grow Berries in the Backyard

    Buying fruit from the grocery store can be expensive! Berries can be especially expensive because they have a quick expiration date and require extra care so they do not get damaged. Growing your own berries is easier than you think and can save you money in the long run. These tips for how to grow berries can help you make the most of your own personal berry garden. Growing Tips for ...


    By Avian Enterprises, LLC

  • NNFCC Crop Chooser

    This decision tree offers advice on which crops to grow for different non-food markets. Summary The crop chooser is a simple tool that helps growers understand the risks and opportunities associated with diversifying into non-food crops. By deciding on the value, risk, level of management and investment you are willing to accept the crop chooser will help identify ...


    By NNFCC

  • Cultivating energy crop production

    A NEW Farm Bill is moving through the Congressional legislative process. Along the way, commercial agriculture is debating the energy impacts of future corn and soybean production. The growth of corn-based ethanol and soybean-based biodiesel has created competition for the feed inputs into animal agriculture, namely corn and soybeans. While most of agriculture discusses energy production from ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Crops flourish with Scalewatcher

    Water is an essential component of horticulture and agriculture whether it is used for irrigating field-scale vegetables, nursery stock, flowers or fruit.  Where water contains high degrees of calcium, magnesium and sodium, it can cause nutrient deficiency in plants and crops resulting in stunted growth and poor yields. Calcium also blocks irrigation systems and boilers in heated ...

  • Manure Compost A New Cash Crop

    A growing number of livestock producers are discovering manure compost as a new cash crop. When Mark Meyer refers to the “magic” at New Day Farms, he isn’t referring  to  the  liquid  egg  products  generated  by more than 2.5 million laying hens. Rather, Meyer, the environmental manager  at the Ohio facility, is talking about the ...

  • Jojoba: A Potential Desert Oil Crop

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis usually grows to a height of 1-2m and may reach heights of three meters or more under ideal growing conditions. S. chinensis has a normal life span of at least 100 years and may live more than 200 years. Pollination is via wind or insects. The fruit is a green capsule enclosing as many three seeds. When ripe (3-6 months after fertilization) the capsule splits and ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • The problems with the arguments against GM crops

    New evidence shows that arguments against GM crops are unfounded, says Margaret Karembu. The year 2013 marked the 18th consecutive year of commercial cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or now commonly referred to as biotech crops. And in just under two decades, the volume of ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • A call to conserve crops’ wild cousins

    Wild cousins aren’t always appreciated at family gatherings. But when it comes to crops, the opposite is often true: Plant breeding has historically relied on genes from plants growing in the wild as a source of diversity that can be introduced into crop plants to produce new crop varieties that are more resilient, nutritious and productive than those currently cultivated. As human ...


    By Ensia

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • Technology that is making plants grow bigger and better

    This article outlines new and improved technology that is enabling growers to increase their yield and output of their crops. The technology includes carbon dioxide (CO2) monitors and controllers, soil moisture sensors, plant based sensors such as sap flow and dendrometers, and nutrient sensors such as EC and TDS sensors. All of the equipment can be automated and data sent to your smart phone or ...


    By Edaphic Scientific

  • Food security faces growing pest advance

    Coming soon to a farm near you: just about every possible type of pest that could take advantage of the ripening harvest in the nearby fields. By 2050, according to new research in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography, those opportunistic viruses, bacteria, fungi, blights, ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Growing demand for soybeans threatens Amazon rainforest

    Some 3,000 years ago, farmers in eastern China domesticated the soybean. In 1765, the first soybeans were planted in North America. Today the soybean occupies more U.S. cropland than wheat. And in Brazil, where it spread even more rapidly, the soybean is invading the Amazon rainforest. For close to two centuries after its introduction into the United States the soybean languished as a curiosity ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Using coir as a growing susbstrate - sustainably and ethically

    Manufactured from the inner husk of coconuts, coir is, but its very nature, produced in distant, and often developing, countries. This means that there is also an ethical slant to consider, as well as the question of shipping costs and carbon use. As retailers apply more pressure on their suppliers to focus on sustainability and ethics, these points are becoming increasingly important. Growers ...


    By Botanicoir Ltd

  • How to grow more food with less water

    Scientists and farmers collaborate on a quest for more efficient irrigation This story was co-published with Civil Eats, a daily news source for critical thought about the American food system. From reading the weather to choosing a ...


    By Ensia

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Modeling olive crop yield in andalusia, spain

    Andalusia (southern Spain) is the largest olive (Olea europaea L.) oil producing region in the world. This study sought to identify the main factors influencing olive fruit production in this region, by modeling pollen release as an index of flowering intensity, field floral phenology data, and meteorological data over the fruiting season in three main olive-producing provinces of Andalusia: ...

  • Crop sensors outdo farmers at choosing nitrogen rates

    Choosing how much nitrogen (N) to put on corn fields isn’t something farmers take lightly. Many factors go into the decision, including past experiences, the timing of application, yield goals, and results from soil tests. Nevertheless, crop sensors can select N rates for corn that outperform those chosen by farmers, according to more than 50 on-farm demonstration projects conducted in ...

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