crop protection model Articles

  • It’s critical to blend climate tracking with development

    During the opening ceremony of the COP 20 climate conference, Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, remarked that the bustling halls and sun-drenched grass patches of the conference site were set up in just six weeks. The ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Soil and water: towards a larger-scale perspective of their relations

    Land use changes over time have altered relations between soils and water cycles throughout Europe. There are regions where forests were cut for agriculture or herding, or for industrial, mining, and/or railroad use. Soils were lost, through mud floods, and the water cycles changed so that their present status is one of badlands and/or desert-like areas. Early stages in the path to degradation ...

  • New approaches are needed for another Green Revolution

    Twenty-first century agriculture needs low-input advances like the System of Rice Intensification, says Norman Uphoff. According to the principle of diminishing returns, continuing to produce something in the same way, with the same inputs and technology, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • A New Generation of GMOs

    Is synthetic biology on its way to our farms, markets and tables? Thousands of researchers will descend on Boston this fall for an event billed as the world’s largest gathering of synthetic biologists. The field is evolving so rapidly that even scientists working in it  ...


    By Ensia

  • Can bats reduce nut farmers’ pesticide use?

    Ecologist Katherine Ingram is on a quest to quantify the economic value of insect-eating bats in walnut groves. For the past three years, Katherine Ingram has had a most unusual summer job: catching bats and studying their droppings to see what they eat. A doctoral student in ecology at the University of California, Davis, Ingram is exploring the role bats can play as winged ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • We must hear — and heed — the nightingale’s warning

    Our rapidly changing world is devastating bird populations, reflecting the health of their habitats and sending us a message about the quality of our own lives. Many birders enjoy playing an imaginary game with one another: “Blindfold me and place me anywhere in the world — I bet I can identify where I am, as long as you let me hear the birds.” This ...


    By Ensia

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

  • Senix Water Level Sensors Drive Irrigation Automation Project

    Australia’s Water Crisis Irrigation management is serious business in Australia especially within the Murray-Darling Basin, a 1,000,000 square kilometer watershed that is home to Australia’s most productive agricultural land. The basin’s 23 rivers have ...


    By Senix Corporation

  • State Fertilizer Officials Focus on Compost

    For two years, the U.S. Composting Council’s (USCC) marketing committee has been meeting with the American Association of Plant Food Control Officials (AAPFCO) to discuss how the two organizations could work together to create a uniform compost bill to be given to each state legislature to consider adopting into law. AAPFCO is an organization of fertilizer control officials from each state in the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The Safety of Genetically Modified Foods Produced through Biotechnology

    Executive Summary The Society of Toxicology (SOT) is committed to protecting and enhancing human, animal, and environmental health through the sound application of the fundamental principles of the science of toxicology. It is with this goal in mind that the SOT defines here its current consensus position on the safety of foods produced through biotechnology ...


    By Oxford University Press

  • Top trends conservationists should be paying attention to — but aren’t

    Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. ...


    By Ensia

  • Global food security is a moral imperative

    We must work to overcome hunger not only for economic and political reasons, but also because it is the right thing to do. It is peculiar to live in a world where hunger is an endemic problem for half the planet while diet books are best sellers in the other half. This point is often lost in the broader bundle of jargon that now defines the conversation on food security in the ...


    By Ensia

  • What’s Happening to the Birds?

    Following in Rachel Carson’s footsteps, a new generation of scientists investigates a new generation of pesticides. Christy Morrissey is driving her white pickup truck along Canada’s endless prairie highway, windows open, listening for birds. She points to the scatter of ponds glinting in the landscape, nestled among fields of canola that stretch as far as the eye ...


    By Ensia

  • Agroecology can help fix our broken food system. Here’s how.

    The various incarnations of the sustainable food movement need a science with which to approach a system as complex as food and farming. This story was co-published with Food Tank, a nonprofit organization focused on building a global community for safe, healthy, nourished eaters. Thumb through U.S. newspapers any day in early 2015, and you could find stories on ...


    By Ensia

  • Understanding uncertainty to prevent humanitarian crises

    Dialogue enables scientists and communities to work with uncertain information, say humanitarian policy experts Emma Visman and colleagues. The international humanitarian and development community does not like uncertainty. Although increasingly effective in many ways, recent crises in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • January Composting Roundup

    St. Paul, Minnesota: State DOT Issues New Compost Specs The Minnesota Department of Transportation (MNDOT) updated its specifications for using finished compost in MNDOT projects in the 2018 Edition of its “Standard Specifications For Construction.” The two main changes to the specs, explains Kayla Walsh of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, are: 1) Inclusion of food ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Livestock Mortalities

    Performance, composting methods, environmental impacts and biosecurity of the process are evaluated for emergency disposal of cattle by research team at Iowa State University. A THREE-YEAR study was commissioned by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to evaluate the practical feasibility, performance, environmental impacts and biosecurity of using composting for emergency disposal - should a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Hydroseeding for Transportation Projects

    Hydroseeding has connections with most forms of transportation, including revegetation around highways, airports, and mass transit projects. It is even a part of water-related travel, if one considers work done on the grounds at marinas, shipping channels, and ports. ...


    By FINN Corporation

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you