crop science Articles

  • Unsound science? Transatlantic regulatory disputes over GM crops

    In the risk debate over genetically modified (GM) crops, Europe's regulatory delays have often been branded as "political", i.e. not based on science. Yet the US slogan "sound science" tends to conceal value-laden features of safety claims, their weak scientific basis, their normative framing and their socio-political influences. By contrast a "precautionary ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Growth analysis of biomass production in sole-crop and double-crop corn systems

    Increased biomass productivity could be achieved through double-cropping if extended growth duration could be realized with minimal reductions in growth efficiency relative to sole-cropping. To test this hypothesis, functional growth analysis was used to assess the relative importance of photosynthetic duration and efficiency in determining biomass production by sole-crop corn (Zea mays L.; SC) ...

  • Crop response to rotation and tillage in peanut-based cropping systems

    Production of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) in reduced tillage systems has increased in the United States during the past decade. However, interactions of tillage system and crop rotation have not been thoroughly investigated for large-seeded, Virginia market type peanut. Research was conducted at two locations in North Carolina during 1999 to 2006 to compare yield of corn (Zea mays L.), cotton ...

  • Crop productivity and economics during the transition to alternative cropping systems

    Many environmental benefits accrue from reducing tillage and increasing crop diversity; however, economic factors often encourage the continued use of intensive tillage and specialized crop production. This study examined crop yields, input costs, and economic returns during the transition to a range of cropping system alternatives in the northern Corn Belt region, including different system ...

  • Use of manure, compost, and cover crops to supplant crop residue carbon in corn stover removed cropping systems

    The emerging cellulosic-based ethanol industry will likely use corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a feedstock source. Growers wishing to maintain, or increase soil C levels for agronomic and environmental benefit will need to use C amendments such as manure, compost, or cover crops, to replace C removed with the corn stover. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of cover crops, ...

  • What is the Future of Horticultural Science in Africa?

    Horticulture is a labour intensive sector that is important for human wellbeing: 'agriculture supplies protein, carbohydrates and staple crops - but we would have a pretty boring life without horticulture.' Nevertheless, in many countries, faculties of agriculture and their departments of horticulture have been swallowed by schools of life or earth sciences. As a result horticulture gets ...

  • Asia–Pacific Analysis: Plan for growth in biotech crops

    South-East Asian nations should follow the Philippines down the path to biotech crops for food security, argues Crispin Maslog. Since biotechnology-derived crops were introduced in 1996, they have been adopted at an unprecedented rate, according to the 2011 annual report of the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) released earlier this year. ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Compost Science & Utilization: Current research

    Materials and Methods Composting To Eradicate Fusarium Graminearum From Infested Livestock FeedInvestigators: Francis J. Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; T. Kelly Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada Objectives: Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, could potentially become a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • One crop, two ways, multiple benefits

    Nitrogen fixation is one of the best examples of cooperation in nature. Soil microbes – naturally occurring bacteria in the soil – work with plants to pull nitrogen from the air. They turn the nitrogen into a form the plant is able to use. In return, the plant lets the microbes eat some of the sugars it makes. Faba beans (also called fava beans) are one example of plants that work ...

  • Enriching African soils key to boosting crop yields

    In African countries where farmers have access and can afford to buy fertiliser, there is a profound difference in agricultural yields, a feature in Nature notes. The red soil found across much of the continent is low in organic matter and key nutrients, and intensive farming in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Compost science journal of advocacy and foresight

    SEVERAL months ago, I started on a journey through the pages of Compost Science, beginning with the Spring, 1960 inaugural issue. I was confident that I could whip through the articles and news items in the several hundred issues of the magazine between 1960 and 2009, and be prepared to write this article for BioCycle’s 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition. Granted, there were interruptions, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Modeling olive crop yield in andalusia, spain

    Andalusia (southern Spain) is the largest olive (Olea europaea L.) oil producing region in the world. This study sought to identify the main factors influencing olive fruit production in this region, by modeling pollen release as an index of flowering intensity, field floral phenology data, and meteorological data over the fruiting season in three main olive-producing provinces of Andalusia: ...

  • Productivity and nutrient dynamics in bioenergy double-cropping systems

    Double-crop systems have the potential to generate additional feedstocks for bioenergy and livestock utilization, and also to reduce NO3–N leaching relative to sole-crop systems. Field studies were conducted near Ames, IA, during 2005–2007 to evaluate productivity and crop and soil nutrient dynamics in three prototypical bioenergy double-crop systems, and in a conventionally managed sole-crop ...

  • Crop sensors outdo farmers at choosing nitrogen rates

    Choosing how much nitrogen (N) to put on corn fields isn’t something farmers take lightly. Many factors go into the decision, including past experiences, the timing of application, yield goals, and results from soil tests. Nevertheless, crop sensors can select N rates for corn that outperform those chosen by farmers, according to more than 50 on-farm demonstration projects conducted in ...

  • Fine root distributions in oilseed and pulse crops

    Fine roots are of great importance in the uptake of water and nutrients from, and input of, carbon to the soil. This study determined the proportion of extra fine ( ...

  • Nitrogen, tillage, and crop rotation effects on carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from irrigated cropping systems

    Received for publication December 15, 2008. Long-term effects of tillage intensity, N fertilization, and crop rotation on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) flux from semiarid irrigated soils are poorly understood. We evaluated effects of: (i) tillage intensity [no-till (NT) and conventional moldboard plow tillage (CT)] in a continuous corn rotation; (ii) N fertilization levels [0–246 kg N ...

  • Case study - Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences (GDAAS)

    There are 13 research institutes under the GDAAS, including specific foods and crops and fertilizer research. The main mission of the institution is to carry out non-profit research around agricultural science and techniques.  As one of the most important agricultural crops institutions, the Crops Research Institute has been focusing on the development of new varieties of crops, cultivation ...


    By Geotech

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Compost Science & Utilization current research March 2007

    Crop Response Extractability, plant yield and toxicity thresholds for boron in compost Investigators: William F. Brinton and Eric Evans, Woods End Research Laboratory, Inc., Mt. Vernon, Maine Objectives: To determine the quantity of total and water-soluble boron in compost and other sources and their relationship to plant performance and toxicity symptoms; and to establish toxicity thresholds ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Soil science gains voice in the US government

    The Soil Science Society of America’s (SSSA) Science Policy Office, started in 1986 and based in Washington, DC, educates United States (US) federal government policymakers about and advocates for soil and the soil sciences. As a result, US agricultural, natural resources and environmental legislation and corresponding federal rules and regulations are more scientifically sound and appropriately ...

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you