crop science Articles

  • Unsound science? Transatlantic regulatory disputes over GM crops

    In the risk debate over genetically modified (GM) crops, Europe's regulatory delays have often been branded as "political", i.e. not based on science. Yet the US slogan "sound science" tends to conceal value-laden features of safety claims, their weak scientific basis, their normative framing and their socio-political influences. By contrast a "precautionary ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Genomic selection for crop improvement

    Despite important strides in marker technologies, the use of marker-assisted selection has stagnated for the improvement of quantitative traits. Biparental mating designs for the detection of loci affecting these traits (quantitative trait loci [QTL]) impede their application, and the statistical methods used are ill-suited to the traits' polygenic nature. Genomic selection (GS) has been proposed ...

  • Science for Environment Policy

    The  economic  impact  of climate  change  on European agriculture A new study has estimated how changes to climate might affect the value of European farmland. Based on data for over 41 000 farms, the results suggest that their economic value could drop by up to 32%, depending on the climate scenario considered- Farms in southern Europe are particularly sensitive to ...

  • Growth analysis of biomass production in sole-crop and double-crop corn systems

    Increased biomass productivity could be achieved through double-cropping if extended growth duration could be realized with minimal reductions in growth efficiency relative to sole-cropping. To test this hypothesis, functional growth analysis was used to assess the relative importance of photosynthetic duration and efficiency in determining biomass production by sole-crop corn (Zea mays L.; SC) ...

  • Science and development highlights of 2012

    The year was marked by one of the most anticipated global environmental meetings in 20 years: the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The summit was a ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Crop response to rotation and tillage in peanut-based cropping systems

    Production of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) in reduced tillage systems has increased in the United States during the past decade. However, interactions of tillage system and crop rotation have not been thoroughly investigated for large-seeded, Virginia market type peanut. Research was conducted at two locations in North Carolina during 1999 to 2006 to compare yield of corn (Zea mays L.), cotton ...

  • Crop productivity and economics during the transition to alternative cropping systems

    Many environmental benefits accrue from reducing tillage and increasing crop diversity; however, economic factors often encourage the continued use of intensive tillage and specialized crop production. This study examined crop yields, input costs, and economic returns during the transition to a range of cropping system alternatives in the northern Corn Belt region, including different system ...

  • A survey of factors involved in crop maturity

    The time necessary for crops to successfully complete reproduction is species and environment dependent. Lifecycles can be completed in a few weeks or take several years depending on the plant species. Crop development is divided into phenophases that are affected primarily by light and temperature changes, interacting with phytohormones. Some species are influenced more by light and others by ...

  • Use of manure, compost, and cover crops to supplant crop residue carbon in corn stover removed cropping systems

    The emerging cellulosic-based ethanol industry will likely use corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a feedstock source. Growers wishing to maintain, or increase soil C levels for agronomic and environmental benefit will need to use C amendments such as manure, compost, or cover crops, to replace C removed with the corn stover. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of cover crops, ...

  • What is the Future of Horticultural Science in Africa?

    Horticulture is a labour intensive sector that is important for human wellbeing: 'agriculture supplies protein, carbohydrates and staple crops - but we would have a pretty boring life without horticulture.' Nevertheless, in many countries, faculties of agriculture and their departments of horticulture have been swallowed by schools of life or earth sciences. As a result horticulture gets ...

  • Compost Science & Utilization: Current research

    Materials and Methods Composting To Eradicate Fusarium Graminearum From Infested Livestock FeedInvestigators: Francis J. Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; T. Kelly Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada Objectives: Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, could potentially become a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost science journal of advocacy and foresight

    SEVERAL months ago, I started on a journey through the pages of Compost Science, beginning with the Spring, 1960 inaugural issue. I was confident that I could whip through the articles and news items in the several hundred issues of the magazine between 1960 and 2009, and be prepared to write this article for BioCycle’s 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition. Granted, there were interruptions, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • One crop, two ways, multiple benefits

    Nitrogen fixation is one of the best examples of cooperation in nature. Soil microbes – naturally occurring bacteria in the soil – work with plants to pull nitrogen from the air. They turn the nitrogen into a form the plant is able to use. In return, the plant lets the microbes eat some of the sugars it makes. Faba beans (also called fava beans) are one example of plants that work ...

  • Enriching African soils key to boosting crop yields

    In African countries where farmers have access and can afford to buy fertiliser, there is a profound difference in agricultural yields, a feature in Nature notes. The red soil found across much of the continent is low in organic matter and key nutrients, and intensive farming in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Asia–Pacific Analysis: Plan for growth in biotech crops

    South-East Asian nations should follow the Philippines down the path to biotech crops for food security, argues Crispin Maslog. Since biotechnology-derived crops were introduced in 1996, they have been adopted at an unprecedented rate, according to the 2011 annual report of the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) released earlier this year. ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Corn belt assessment of cover crop management and preferences

    Surveying end-users about their use of technologies and preferences provides information for researchers and educators to develop relevant research and educational programs. A mail survey was sent to Corn Belt farmers during 2006 to quantify cover crop management and preferences. Results indicated that the dominant cereal cover crops in Indiana and Illinois are winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) ...

  • Fine root distributions in oilseed and pulse crops

    Fine roots are of great importance in the uptake of water and nutrients from, and input of, carbon to the soil. This study determined the proportion of extra fine ( ...

  • Modeling olive crop yield in andalusia, spain

    Andalusia (southern Spain) is the largest olive (Olea europaea L.) oil producing region in the world. This study sought to identify the main factors influencing olive fruit production in this region, by modeling pollen release as an index of flowering intensity, field floral phenology data, and meteorological data over the fruiting season in three main olive-producing provinces of Andalusia: ...

  • Crop sensors outdo farmers at choosing nitrogen rates

    Choosing how much nitrogen (N) to put on corn fields isn’t something farmers take lightly. Many factors go into the decision, including past experiences, the timing of application, yield goals, and results from soil tests. Nevertheless, crop sensors can select N rates for corn that outperform those chosen by farmers, according to more than 50 on-farm demonstration projects conducted in ...

  • Crop genotype and plant population density impact flowering Phenology and Synchrony between cropped and volunteer spring

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of many crops into which novel traits have been incorporated using recombinant DNA technology, and thus may require segregation from nontransgenic wheat. Volunteer wheat populations, which cannot be selectively removed from wheat crops, pose a challenge to segregation because they may serve to facilitate trait movement. However, diverse flowering phenologies ...

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