crop temperature sensor Articles

  • Prevent harmful conditions from damaging crops with sensor alerts

    Your algae monitoring and control system is all set up, humming along efficiently, and the algae is growing well. Your solenoids are controlling the CO2 input so that your pH is always on target. Coolers (or heaters) are controlling your temperature. Maybe you even have automatic harvesting based on the density of your algae. But what happens if one of the devices breaks down? Pumps, valves, ...


    By Algae Lab Systems

  • Agriculture minimum temperature

     Agriculture minimum temperature Prediction of minimum temperature and frost damage is a common method and important application in the field of agriculture like outdoors crop growth. In particular those areas where vegetation can be exposed to low temperatures, frost can be disastrous for young vegetation or fruits.When the ...


    By Delta OHM S.r.L.

  • Studying the Effect of Global Warming on Tropical Crops

    Researchers have long been using impact studies to study the effects of climate change on cocoa growth. These studies mimic conditions predicted at the end of the century1 such as higher levels of drought and higher levels of atmospheric CO2. Studies have shown that increased levels of CO2 may help offset the negative effects of reduced water availability on the ...


    By Edinburgh Sensors Ltd

  • Simulating the Effect of Climate Change on Agriculture

    Increased atmospheric CO2 levels and climate change are believed to contribute to extreme weather conditions, which is a major concern for many. And beyond extreme events, global warming is also predicted to affect agriculture.1,2 While climate change is expected to affect agriculture and reduce crop yields, the complete ...


    By Edinburgh Sensors Ltd

  • How to grow more food with less water

    Scientists and farmers collaborate on a quest for more efficient irrigation This story was co-published with Civil Eats, a daily news source for critical thought about the American food system. From reading the weather to choosing a ...


    By Ensia

  • Measuring CO2 to Optimise the Bulk Storage of Food

    Meeting the food requirements of a growing global population is becoming increasingly difficult. Despite the need for additional food, it is estimated that 50-60% of grain is lost after harvesting, at a cost of about $1 trillion per year.1 One of the major reasons for lost grain is spoilage due to mould or insect infestation during storage.2 To provide a ...


    By Edinburgh Sensors Ltd

  • Semios Receives US EPA Approval for 3 New Pheromones To Target the Most Destructive Pests in the Apple & Pear Industry

    Vancouver, BC, November 24, 2014 – Semios, provider of real-time agricultural information and precision pest management tools, has been given US EPA approval for three aerosol pheromone products that disrupt the mating of codling moth and oriental fruit moth. “Our new formula performs extremely well at lower temperatures, emitting a drier mist that disperses quickly across an ...


    By SemiosBio Technologies Inc.

  • Wireless Greenhouse Monitoring and Control

    CAS DataLoggers Provides the Intelligent Automated Solution A fruit crop experiment station needed to remotely monitor and control its climate systems in a number of greenhouses.  The proposed system needed to monitor soil moisture content and temperature and actively control irrigation and airflow by opening and closing windows to ensure that the appropriate temperature was ...


    By CAS DATALOGGERS

  • From electronic noses to invasive bees, 15 surprising trends for 2017

    What should we be thinking about when we think about the future of biodiversity, conservation and the environment? An international team of experts in horizon scanning, science communication and conservation recently asked that question as participants in the eighth annual Horizon Scan of Emerging Issues for ...


    By Ensia

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    “In early 2008, Saudi Arabia announced that, after being self-sufficient in wheat for over 20 years, the non-replenishable aquifer it had been pumping for irrigation was largely depleted,” writes Lester R. Brown in his new book, Plan B 4.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization (W.W. Norton & Company). “In response, officials said they would reduce their wheat harvest by one eighth each year ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

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