crop yield Articles

  • When population growth and resource availability collide

    As land and water become scarce, competition for these vital resources intensifies within societies, particularly between the wealthy and those who are poor and dispossessed. The shrinkage of life-supporting resources per person that comes with population growth is threatening to drop the living standards of millions of people below the survival level, leading to potentially unmanageable social ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Jatropha as Bio-Diesel

    Introduction:- Jatropha curcus L. belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae. It is believed to be a native of South America & Africa but later spread to other continents of the world by the Portuguese settlers. The Arabs have ...


  • Understanding uncertainty to prevent humanitarian crises

    Dialogue enables scientists and communities to work with uncertain information, say humanitarian policy experts Emma Visman and colleagues. The international humanitarian and development community does not like uncertainty. Although increasingly effective in many ways, recent crises in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Cayuga County, New York Pioneers Community Digester Program

    New project of Soil And Water Conservation District will help control odors and improve water quality while generating biogas with an innovative system. A bioenergy vision that started several years ago is finally being built at the Cayuga County Soil and Water Conservation District headquarters in Auburn, New York. Jim Hotaling, Executive Director, has long envisioned a community digester ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • U.S. National Organic Program Approves Ban on Engineered Nanomaterials from Organic Products

    On December 17, 2010, the US National Organic Program (NOP) voted to accept the recommendation of the US National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) to prohibit engineered nanomaterials from the production, processing, and packaging of certified organic products.  The decision was made with little fanfare, but has big implications. Background ...


    By Acta Group

  • Hydrophobic Soils

    Water is the driving force of all nature. “Hydrophobicity” (  ...


    By Soil Doctors

  • Composting and local food merge st urban garden

    Growing Power (GP), a nonprofit urban garden and training center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, provides affordable produce to neighborhoods without access to fresh food, and processes a variety of organic wastes through composting and anaerobic digestion. Located on a two-acre lot on Milwaukee's north side, the six greenhouses and several hoop houses include raised beds for herbs and greens, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Biocycle World

    OPTIONS FOR MANAGING COMPOST LEACHATE DURING EXCESSIVE RAINFALL CONDITIONSAn Information Sheet prepared by The Composting Association in the United Kingdom gives an overview of available options for managing “liquor” (leachate) produced at composting sites - especially following the excessively rainy spring/summer of 2007. “Compost leachate” can be described as water that has changed in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Listening to Underground Music at Washington State University

    Dr. Weller is Research Leader of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Services Wheat Health, Genetics and Quality Research Unit at Washington State University (WSU), Pullman, Washington. His specialty is plant pathology and the cutting-edge research that his research unit conducts ...


    By Waters Corporation

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    “In early 2008, Saudi Arabia announced that, after being self-sufficient in wheat for over 20 years, the non-replenishable aquifer it had been pumping for irrigation was largely depleted,” writes Lester R. Brown in his new book, Plan B 4.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization (W.W. Norton & Company). “In response, officials said they would reduce their wheat harvest by one eighth each year ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Putting community resilience into practice - Initial lessons learned

    Partners for Resilience (PfR) is a collaboration of CARE Nederland, Cordaid, the Netherlands Red Cross (NLRC), the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre, Wetlands International and 30 civil society partners in the global South. It is one of the biggest programmes of its kind in the world, working on ecosystem-based and climate-smart disaster risk reduction (DRR) in nine countries (see map below), ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Seasteading could be the answer to sustainably feeding 9 billion people

    Self-sufficient nation states in the middle of the ocean might be our ticket to a sustainable future. Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth’s surface, yet provide less than 2 percent of the food we eat. The growing demand for seafood, however — predicted to rise to 8 percent during the next decade — from an already depleted and exhausted ocean is forcing ...


    By Ensia

  • 7 Species of Bees Added to Endangered List

    Introduction For the first time in history, several American bee species have been classified as endangered. There are many factors that have contributed to the decline in bee populations in recent years, with climate change being at the root of many of these issues. In order to save the dwindling number of bees, we must implement the mitigation and management plans that are in place, ...


    By Climate Institute

  • Compost science journal of advocacy and foresight

    SEVERAL months ago, I started on a journey through the pages of Compost Science, beginning with the Spring, 1960 inaugural issue. I was confident that I could whip through the articles and news items in the several hundred issues of the magazine between 1960 and 2009, and be prepared to write this article for BioCycle’s 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition. Granted, there were interruptions, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • If Our Planet Had a Say, Here’s Where Future Roads Would Go

    A new global ‘roadmap’ shows where to put roads for maximum benefit and least cost to the Earth. “The best thing you could do for the Amazon is to blow up all the roads.” These might sound like the words of an eco-terrorist, but it’s actually a direct quote from ...


    By Ensia

  • Compost integral in new website in building soil

    A website called “BuildingSoil” has been launched by the Washington Organic Recycling Council to help builders preserve healthy soil on building sites. It's the latest Soils for Salmon project which aims to change standard site development practices. These new “soil best management practices” will soon be required by local governments around western Washington, as they update local codes to ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Enhancements in Meteorological and Hydrological Models Using Soil Moisture Data

    It has long been known that there is a strong relationship between soil water content and the health and yield of crops. But only in the past few decades has science quantified the specifics of these relationships. This research has expanded to develop a relationship between soil moisture levels and the impact on ...

  • Is Horticultural Science in Crisis? What is Needed to Assure Its Future?

    "Kenya has a shortage of competent horticultural staff at institutional and commercial levels." "Horticulture is facing a crisis in the United Kingdom." "Is horticulture a withering field in the USA?" "Concerns over shortage of agriculture graduates In Australia." "Uganda's flower sector faces an imminent shortage of qualified managers and supervisors in flower ...

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