dairy cattle feed Articles

  • Seasonal Changes in Airborne Fungi and Bacteria at a Dairy Cattle Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation in the Southwest United States

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a dairy located in the arid southwest United States to determine the concentrations and seasonal variation of airborne fungi and bacteria and to determine the percentage of antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The authors used two-stage ambient air sampling systems to measure the culturable airborne fungal organisms and bacteria on a monthly ...

  • Research highlights cattle emissions reduction opportunity

    Researchers in Denmark have measured the quantities of greenhouse gases in the breath of dairy cows and demonstrated a heritable variability between individual animals. “This means that we have an opportunity to select for breeding those individuals which will produce offspring that generate less methane,” says Dr Jan Lassen who led the research project on individual methane ...


    By Gasmet Technologies Oy

  • Dairy Industry Industry - Pollution Prevention Guidelines

    Introduction Pollution Prevention Guidelines to provide technical advice and guidance to staff and consultants involved in pollution-related projects. The guidelines represent state-of-the-art thinking on how to reduce pollution emissions from the production process. In many cases, the guidelines provide numerical targets for reducing pollution, as well as maximum ...


    By The World Bank

  • Dietary forage impacts on dairy slurry nitrogen availability to corn

    Precise feeding of protein and mineral supplement can maintain high levels of milk production and reduce nutrient excretion in dairy manure and losses to the environment. No information is available on the impacts of feeding different silages to dairy cattle (Bos taurus) on manure N cycling in soils. Slurry from dairy cattle fed rations containing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.; ALF), red clover ...

  • Nitrogen losses from dairy manure estimated through nitrogen mass balance and chemical markers

    Received for publication February 13, 2009. Ammonia is an important air and water pollutant, but the spatial variation in its concentrations presents technical difficulties in accurate determination of ammonia emissions from animal feeding operations. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between ammonia volatilization and 15N of dairy manure and the feasibility of ...

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Reducing the Environmental Impact of Cows` Waste

    No disrespect to cows, but they produce a lot of gas. And while farmers may be unfazed by the smell, the gas is methane, one of the most potent greenhouse gases. Across the globe, livestock spew 14.5 percent of all greenhouse gases (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and fluorinated gases) released in the environment, and over half that comes specifically from cows, according to a United ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Clean, green and powered by cow patties

    Two dome-like structures rise out of the thick ice fog of a Prairie winter day. From a distance, a science-fiction city seems to be taking shape on the rolling grasslands of east-central Alberta. Then, as you draw near, another sensation takes hold – the oppressively pungent odour of cow manure. On this day, the enveloping fog is making the smell worse than usual, explains Bern ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Closed loop system takes manure and methane

    A CONVERSION plant in Mead, Nebraska is processing manure and methane to create ethanol and compost. According to Nebraska Governor Dave Heineman: “This plant sets a new standard for ethanol production in this state and our nation, and is an example of the innovation needed to take this industry to the next level. It lets America get its automotive fuel from the croplands of the Midwest instead ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Syracuse, New York: AD Adds To Dog Treat Bakery’s Sustainability

    Full Circle Feed in Syracuse makes healthy, environmentally-sustainable dog treats with unused meats, vegetables, fruits, and breads from restaurant buffets that were prepared but not served. It recently won the grand prize of $10,000 in Green America’s Fall 2016 People & Planet contest in the category of sustainable products and services for pets and animals. “Full Circle Feed ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Prairie `agri-preneurs` battle megafarm waste

    Gwyn Morgan is the retired founding CEO of EnCana Corp. The revolting image of foaming green sludge washed up on a Lake Winnipeg beach in the Aug. 24 edition of Maclean's is part of, as the accompanying article states: "a putrid green mat, twice the size of PEI, and clearly visible from space ... The culprit isn't oil spills, toxic waste or even pesticides, but nutrient overloading from ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Tapping the potential of codigestion

    Codigestion refers to processing multiple biodegradable substrates (feedstocks) in an anaerobic digestion (AD) system. A more contemporary definition refers to the digestion of a combination of select biodegradable feedstocks with a base substrate that an AD system was designed to handle. The intent is to maximize the production of biogas (i.e., renewable energy) by adding substrates that produce ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • California company closes the composting loop

    BEFORE we made our first ton of compost, we had already talked to farmers to determine what they needed in a soil amendment,” says Roger Van Der Wende, Vice President, Supermarket Division, Community Recycling & Resource Recovery, Inc. (Community) in Sun Valley, California. Considering the fastidious navigation the company has done to advance in a previously uncharted realm of resource ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Growing demand for soybeans threatens Amazon rainforest

    Some 3,000 years ago, farmers in eastern China domesticated the soybean. In 1765, the first soybeans were planted in North America. Today the soybean occupies more U.S. cropland than wheat. And in Brazil, where it spread even more rapidly, the soybean is invading the Amazon rainforest. For close to two centuries after its introduction into the United States the soybean languished as a curiosity ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Advances in Oregon and Washington

    Over the years, different forces have served as drivers to help grow the composting industry. For example, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was the perceived landfill crisis that led to state bans on disposal of yard trimmings. Composting also has benefitted from a push to meet recycling goals, which has prompted states and local governments to go beyond yard trimmings and into such ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

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