field scale vegetable Articles

  • Spatial analysis of early wheat canopy normalized difference vegetative index: determining appropriate observation scale

    Efficient use of real-time canopy sensors requires knowledge of the scale (resolution) of variation in the measured canopy property. Knowing the amount of needed optical data requires estimation of the optimal combination of physical sensor density (number of sensors along the applicator boom) and sensor output density (sensor readings per unit distance along the travel path). The objective of ...

  • Spatial analysis of early wheat canopy normalized difference vegetative index

    Efficient use of real-time canopy sensors requires knowledge of the scale (resolution) of variation in the measured canopy property. Knowing the amount of needed optical data requires estimation of the optimal combination of physical sensor density (number of sensors along the applicator boom) and sensor output density (sensor readings per unit distance along the travel path). The objective of ...

  • Comparing RGB-based vegetation indices with NDVI for agricultural drone imagery

    Abstract Agribotix conducted a post hoc test of two vegetation indices, VARI and TGI, that used only the three visible-band signals from an unmodified CMOS camera. The results were compared to NDVI, which is generally considered to be a reliable measure of field health and the underlying RGB image. While the results are somewhat encouraging in limited cases, it is clear that neither VARI nor ...


    By Agribotix LLC

  • Valuation of nitrogen retention as an ecosystem service on a catchment scale

    An ecosystem service approach was used to study the water purification service exemplified by impacts of land management scenarios. Nitrogen retention was calculated in two agricultural catchments by the dynamic Integrated Nutrients in Catchments (INCA)-N model. The monetary valuation was based on purification efficiency of artificial wetlands. The set of scenarios were based on existing ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Soil and water: towards a larger-scale perspective of their relations

    Land use changes over time have altered relations between soils and water cycles throughout Europe. There are regions where forests were cut for agriculture or herding, or for industrial, mining, and/or railroad use. Soils were lost, through mud floods, and the water cycles changed so that their present status is one of badlands and/or desert-like areas. Early stages in the path to degradation ...

  • Risk mitigation measures for diffuse pesticide entry into aquatic ecosystems: Proposal of a guide to identify appropriate measures on a catchment scale

    Measures to mitigate the risk of pesticide entry into aquatic ecosystems are becoming increasingly more important in the management of hot spots of pesticide transfer; such management, for example, is required by the European Union's directive for the sustainable use of pesticides (2009/128/EC). Measures beyond those currently stipulated for pesticide product authorization may be needed. A ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Ground-based canopy reflectance sensing for variable-rate nitrogen corn fertilization

    Nitrogen available to support corn (Zea mays L.) production can be highly variable within fields. Canopy reflectance sensing for assessing crop N health has been proposed as a technology to base side-dress variable-rate N application. Objectives of this research were to evaluate the use of active-light crop-canopy reflectance sensors for assessing corn N need, and derive the N fertilizer rate ...

  • Pilot Test for Dinoseb Reduction at an Agricultural Facility

    Site Summary Dinoseb (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol) is a phenolic herbicide used on soybeans, vegetables, fruits and nuts, citrus,and other field crops for the selective control of grass and broadleaf weeds. It is also used as an insecticide in grapes,and as a seed crop drying agent. In 1986 dinoseb was banned as a commercially available product in the U.S. becauseof the potential ...


    By REGENESIS

  • Potato yield and quality response to subsoil tillage and compaction

    Compacted soils have been found in intensively cultivated vegetable crop regions of Central Wisconsin, resulting in the wide scale use of subsoil tillage by growers. The goal of this project was to assess potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) yield and quality response to soil compaction and subsoil tillage. Potato quality factors evaluated were marketable yield, tuber size distribution, internal ...

  • Consider Cable Concrete Erosion Control Solutions for Natural and Manmade Causes of Ground Erosion

    The weather is a powerful force that’s capable of leaving all types and levels of destruction in its wake. Shifting soil is one of the most common results of wet or windy weather, and it’s a natural event needed to maintain the environment. Something to note, however, is that although soil erosion is a naturally occurring process, there are times when erosion situations are influenced ...

  • The manage database: nutrient load and site characteristic updates and runoff concentration data

    The 'Measured Annual Nutrient loads from AGricultural Environments' (MANAGE) database was developed to be a readily accessible, easily queried database of site characteristic and field-scale nutrient export data. The original version of MANAGE, which drew heavily from an early 1980s compilation of nutrient export data, created an electronic database with nutrient load data and corresponding site ...

  • Vertisol crack extent associated with gilgai and soil moisture in the Texas gulf coast prairie

    Long-term observations of in situ crack formation and closure in shrink-swell soils are rare, but important to understanding hydrology in shrink-swell soils. To analyze spatial and temporal variability of crack development in a Vertisol with gilgai, soil cracks were measured on a 100-m2 area of Laewest clay (fine, smectitic, hyperthermic Typic Hapludert) with native tallgrass vegetation on 42 ...

  • Crops flourish with Scalewatcher

    Water is an essential component of horticulture and agriculture whether it is used for irrigating field-scale vegetables, nursery stock, flowers or fruit.  Where water contains high degrees of calcium, magnesium and sodium, it can cause nutrient deficiency in plants and crops resulting in stunted growth and poor yields. Calcium also blocks irrigation systems and boilers in heated ...

  • Composting

    Introduction Composting is a controlled biological process by which organic contaminants (e.g., PAHs) are converted by microorganisms (under aerobic and anaerobic conditions) to innocuous, stabilized byproducts. Typically, thermophilic conditions (54 to 65 °C) must be maintained to properly compost soil contaminated with hazardous organic contaminants. The increased temperatures result from heat ...

  • Jatropha as Bio-Diesel

    Introduction:- Jatropha curcus L. belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae. It is believed to be a native of South America & Africa but later spread to other continents of the world by the Portuguese settlers. The Arabs have ...


  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • Piedmont Biofuels Spawns Ecoindustrial Park

    DRIVE to the end of Lorax Lane in Pittsboro, North Carolina, and you will discover a slice of the future of America. In one location, you can find - among other things -a biofuels station, a sustainable farm, a hydroponic greenhouse, a vermicomposting operation, an organic food distributor, a natural bug repellant manufacturer and a bookkeeper. And it all started with Piedmont Biofuels Industrial ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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