field scale vegetable Articles

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Spatial analysis of early wheat canopy normalized difference vegetative index: determining appropriate observation scale

    Efficient use of real-time canopy sensors requires knowledge of the scale (resolution) of variation in the measured canopy property. Knowing the amount of needed optical data requires estimation of the optimal combination of physical sensor density (number of sensors along the applicator boom) and sensor output density (sensor readings per unit distance along the travel path). The objective of ...

  • Spatial analysis of early wheat canopy normalized difference vegetative index

    Efficient use of real-time canopy sensors requires knowledge of the scale (resolution) of variation in the measured canopy property. Knowing the amount of needed optical data requires estimation of the optimal combination of physical sensor density (number of sensors along the applicator boom) and sensor output density (sensor readings per unit distance along the travel path). The objective of ...

  • Pilot Test for Dinoseb Reduction at an Agricultural Facility

    Site Summary Dinoseb (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol) is a phenolic herbicide used on soybeans, vegetables, fruits and nuts, citrus,and other field crops for the selective control of grass and broadleaf weeds. It is also used as an insecticide in grapes,and as a seed crop drying agent. In 1986 dinoseb was banned as a commercially available product in the U.S. becauseof the potential ...


    By REGENESIS

  • Potato yield and quality response to subsoil tillage and compaction

    Compacted soils have been found in intensively cultivated vegetable crop regions of Central Wisconsin, resulting in the wide scale use of subsoil tillage by growers. The goal of this project was to assess potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) yield and quality response to soil compaction and subsoil tillage. Potato quality factors evaluated were marketable yield, tuber size distribution, internal ...

  • Vertisol crack extent associated with gilgai and soil moisture in the Texas gulf coast prairie

    Long-term observations of in situ crack formation and closure in shrink-swell soils are rare, but important to understanding hydrology in shrink-swell soils. To analyze spatial and temporal variability of crack development in a Vertisol with gilgai, soil cracks were measured on a 100-m2 area of Laewest clay (fine, smectitic, hyperthermic Typic Hapludert) with native tallgrass vegetation on 42 ...

  • The manage database: nutrient load and site characteristic updates and runoff concentration data

    The 'Measured Annual Nutrient loads from AGricultural Environments' (MANAGE) database was developed to be a readily accessible, easily queried database of site characteristic and field-scale nutrient export data. The original version of MANAGE, which drew heavily from an early 1980s compilation of nutrient export data, created an electronic database with nutrient load data and corresponding site ...

  • Crops flourish with Scalewatcher

    Water is an essential component of horticulture and agriculture whether it is used for irrigating field-scale vegetables, nursery stock, flowers or fruit.  Where water contains high degrees of calcium, magnesium and sodium, it can cause nutrient deficiency in plants and crops resulting in stunted growth and poor yields. Calcium also blocks irrigation systems and boilers in heated ...

  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • How three U.S. mini-farms are sowing the seeds of global food security

    Tiny, biointensive operations show smallholder farmers from around the world how they can grow far more food than conventional approaches. Her face shaded by a wide-brimmed straw hat, Olawumi Benedict is cheerfully tending to her “little babies” — kale seedlings growing in shallow wooden flats until they’re hardy enough for transplantation into soil beds. Three miles over ...


    By Ensia

  • The number one thing each of us can do to protect biodiversity

    Reducing our consumption of animal products can go a long way toward conserving endangered habitat around the world. Agriculture expansion is the leading driver of natural habitat loss worldwide. However, most of this growth is not to produce vegetables, fruits or grains to be eaten by people. Ecosystems are destroyed overwhelmingly to feed livestock. Livestock production ...


    By Ensia

  • Arsenic in irrigated paddy soils

    Natural arsenic pollution of drinking water has been reported from over 70 countries world-wide, affecting an estimated 150 million people (Ravenscroft et. al., 2008). About 50 million of these people live in Bangladesh, 30 million in India and 33 million in six other countries of south and south-east Asia. It has recently been recognised that arsenic-contaminated groundwater used for irrigation ...

  • Preconsumer Collection : Composting Food Service Scraps at Resort

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Users Forum : Compost Research On Wisconsin Organic Farm

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Is Horticultural Science in Crisis? What is Needed to Assure Its Future?

    "Kenya has a shortage of competent horticultural staff at institutional and commercial levels." "Horticulture is facing a crisis in the United Kingdom." "Is horticulture a withering field in the USA?" "Concerns over shortage of agriculture graduates In Australia." "Uganda's flower sector faces an imminent shortage of qualified managers and supervisors in flower ...

  • Composting Advances in Oregon and Washington

    Over the years, different forces have served as drivers to help grow the composting industry. For example, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was the perceived landfill crisis that led to state bans on disposal of yard trimmings. Composting also has benefitted from a push to meet recycling goals, which has prompted states and local governments to go beyond yard trimmings and into such ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Climate Smart Agriculture: Zambia’s Strategy to Reduce Emissions

    The agricultural sector is believed to be the backbone of the Zambian economy thereby alleviating problems associated with poverty and food security. The development of the sector is viewed as one sustainable way of economic growth and ‘Eradicating Extreme Poverty and Hunger’ which is goal number one of the Millennium Development Goals (UN, 2000). The sector contributes to the growth ...


    By TractorExport

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