fish breeding Articles

  • AZUD solutions to fish farms

    All the elements in the exploitation guarantee that larvae, the juvenile and adult breeding of bivalves keep the quality conditions inside the correct values, which allow a high reproduction and growing rates. ...


    By Sistema Azud, S.A.

  • Spanish Fish Farmer chooses LIT

    Spanish fish farmer chooses LIT-UV Isidro de la Cal is a Spanish group of companies that are active in the fish industry. The company controls the entire process of farming, capturing, processing and finally selling the end product to the stores where consumers buy the various fish products. The fish that is processed by Isidro de la Cal comes from various national, mainly Galician, and ...

  • For lively fish in the water Oil-free generation of oxygen at fish farm - Case Study

    For 30 years, trout have been cultivated at the Winkelmann farm in Wietzendorf (Lower Saxony), southeast of the city of Soltau. What started out as a hobby ultimately became a business. Since then, the main goal has been the preparation of fish eggs, caviar (roe). The female trout are brought up in concrete semi-circulating basins and slaughtered after 26 to 29 months as salmon trout. The annual ...

  • Biological water treatment in aquaculture by means of “Mutag BioChip™ RAS Process“

    Aquaculture or fish farming means the artificial breeding and raising of aquatic creatures. They include fish as well as crustaceans and shellfish, which are raised and stocked under controlled conditions by using techniques and technologies offering an increased level of productivity which cannot be realized under natural conditions. Due to the increased demand for freshly caught fish and ...


    By Multi Umwelttechnologie AG

  • Freshwater ecosystems

    Freshwater ecosystems in Europe are rich in biodiversity and provide essential ecosystem services to humans Europe's freshwater ecosystems range from rivers, flood plains, lakes and ponds, marshes and peatlands, to man-made water bodies such as canals and reservoirs (EC, 2007a; EC, 2007b). They encompass a broad variety of wetlands. These different systems also interact with groundwater. ...

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Mangroves for Coastal Resilience

    Coastal wetlands such as mangrove forests strongly contribute to the safety, food security and income of tens of millions of people throughout the tropics. Wetlands International has helped to restore and conserve thousands of hectares of mangrove forests, closely working with coastal communities. We aim to increase coastal resilience and reduce disaster risk by championing and enabling ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Modern strains put Lake Victoria in critical condition

    Pollution and overfishing in Lake Victoria have become so severe that scientists believe they threaten the health and livelihoods of millions of East Africans.   And researchers in the three countries bordering the ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater‐breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Composting and local food merge st urban garden

    Growing Power (GP), a nonprofit urban garden and training center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, provides affordable produce to neighborhoods without access to fresh food, and processes a variety of organic wastes through composting and anaerobic digestion. Located on a two-acre lot on Milwaukee's north side, the six greenhouses and several hoop houses include raised beds for herbs and greens, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Release of the 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species reveals ongoing decline of the status of plants and animals

    The number of known threatened species reaches 16,119. The ranks of those facing extinction are joined by familiar species like the polar bear, hippopotamus and desert gazelles; together with ocean sharks, freshwater fish and Mediterranean flowers. Positive action has helped the white-tailed eagle and offers a glimmer of hope to Indian vultures. Geneva, Switzerland, 2 May 2006 (IUCN) – The ...

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Earth out of sync rising temperatures throwing off seasonal timing

    A newly hatched chick waits with hungry mouth agape for a parent to deliver its first meal. A crocus peaks up through the snow. Rivers flow swiftly as ice breaks up and snows melt. Sleepy mammals emerge from hibernation, and early frog songs penetrate the night. Spring awakening has long provided fodder for poets, artists, and almanac writers. Even for a notoriously fickle time of sunshine, ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Turning abandoned rice fields into mangroves

    What do you do when mangroves fail to naturally recolonise abandoned rice fields in one of the most precious mangrove deltas of the world? Pieter van Eijk reports on a recent mission to Western Africa that paves the way for large-scale mangrove recovery through a so-called ‘ecological restoration’ approach. ...


    By Wetlands International

  • A Decade After Asian Tsunami, New Forests Protect the Coast

    The tsunami that struck Indonesia in 2004 obliterated vast areas of Aceh province. But villagers there are using an innovative microcredit scheme to restore mangrove forests and other coastal ecosystems that will serve as a natural barrier against future killer waves and storms. On the day that the Indian Ocean tsunami hit his village a decade ago, fisherman Hajamuddin was at sea. It was ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Biotechnology for Environmentally Safe Agriculture

    Issue: In Europe some uses of biotechnology are meeting vocal opposition from certain quarters. Nevertheless, the vast amount of knowledge acquired recently in biology can be used to develop and apply biotechnology for an environmentally safe agriculture. Public acceptance and a new policy impetus can serve to promote the introduction of safe and competitive agricultural technologies that have a ...

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

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