fish farm environmental management Articles

  • Development of Indonesian Fish Farming & Aquaculture Production

    Part 1.Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Part 2.Reasons Why Fishery Industry Develops Fast in Indonesia Part 3.Fish Farm Types in Indonesian Part 4.Sustainable Development of the Fishery in Indonesia Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Fish farming is the ...

  • The advantages and disadvantages of culturing fish.

    The advantages and disadvantages of culturing fish. Experts develop practical recommendations for decision-makers, scientists and producers for a sustainable development of Mediterranean aquaculture. Human demand for fish is growing steadily. With fisheries decreasing worldwide, aquaculture is becoming an important socio-economic alternative and a source of proteins and healthy oils. ...

  • Ecosystem management planning for farm conversion - case study

    Based on a survey that revealed unexpected plant and animal treasures, we developed an ecosystem management plan to harmonise activity with the environment. Based on a survey that revealed unexpected plant and animal treasures on a Western Cape Farm, we developed an ecosystem management plan to harmonise economic activity with the natural environment. Voorhoede Farm near Caledon in the ...

  • Nutrient-Balance Modeling as a Tool for Environmental Management in Aquaculture: The Case of Trout Farming in France

    The control and prevention of nutrient pollution from fish farming plays an essential role in the French regulatory framework. Assessing nutrient emissions from fish farms is important in terms of farm authorization, taxation, and monitoring. Currently employed strategies involve both water sampling and empirical modeling. This article reports the work and outcomes of an expert panel that ...


    By Springer

  • How green was my Vertical Farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever.The problem is real and immediate. Even by most ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Shrimp farming: Why prevention is better than medicine

    Disease challenges that have affected a number of key shrimp production regions around the world in recent years have increased the focus on producing healthier and more robust stocks. In addition to establishing very strict sanitary requirements, many shrimp farmers have sought new health-specific diets across the shrimp lifecycle that progress growth and reduce bacterial challenges. Some, ...


    By Skretting - Nutreco Group

  • From factory to farm – industry opportunities for surplus food

    Food waste management is a common topic in the industry, as manufacturers and retailers strive to improve their environmental compliance and, ultimately, their profitability. But in line with the increasingly popular concept of the circular economy, specialist surplus food recycler SugaRich is working with producers and stores, large and small, to show that this ...


    By SugaRich

  • ASM proven sonic wave technology remove filamentous algae of fishnets in a environmentally way!

    Fish net cleaning is one of the biggest costs in marine aquaculture management is weed growth on fish cages and the labour and plant costs devoted to cleaning nets is significant. Considerable effort and research has been devoted by ASM to this particular challenge and recent technological advances have been applied. Also,diseases are easily spread among farmed fish due to the ...

  • Water resources management in Sub-Saharan Africa: a status review of Niger Republic

    Water determines the survival, health, and welfare of human beings and other biotic and abiotic communities, as well as destructive agents in some situations/times. More than a billion people do not have access to potable water and more than two billion people lack proper sanitation globally. For any environmentally sustainable usage of water resources to be meaningful a sound management ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Value of composted organic wastes as an alternative to synthetic fertilizers for soil quality improvement and increased yield

    One of the major problems with agricultural soils in the tropical region of the western Pacific islands is their low organic matter content, which results from rapid decomposition due to the hot and humid environment. Composted organic material is frequently applied on agricultural fields as an amendment to provide nutrients and also to increase the organic matter content and to improve the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting In rural Alaska

    Gardeners, communities and commercial enterprises have proven that composting works in Alaska, especially given large quantities of fish waste and diminishing landfill capacity. ALASKA is two and a half times larger than the largest state in the lower 48 states. Over half of the entire state’s population lives within the municipality of Anchorage. Many Alaskan villages can only be reached ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Future Brief: Sustainable Aquaculture

    Is sustainable aquaculture possible? Aquaculture is facing a new era of expansion in Europe. What are the environmental implications of this, and how can the sector expand sustainably? This Future Brief from Science for Environment Policy presents an overview of research into aquaculture’s impacts, and considers how it could develop in harmony with environmental goals. The ...


    By European Commission

  • Composting and local food merge st urban garden

    Growing Power (GP), a nonprofit urban garden and training center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, provides affordable produce to neighborhoods without access to fresh food, and processes a variety of organic wastes through composting and anaerobic digestion. Located on a two-acre lot on Milwaukee's north side, the six greenhouses and several hoop houses include raised beds for herbs and greens, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Agricultural water conservation and efficiency in California: a special focus on the Delta

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a critical resource. Almost half of the water used for California’s agriculture comes from rivers that once flowed to the Delta and more than half of Californians rely on water conveyed through the Delta for at least some of their water supply. The Delta also provides habitat for 700 native plant and animal species. This important region is now in a serious, ...


    By Pacific Institute

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Top trends conservationists should be paying attention to — but aren’t

    Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Can nutrient trading shrink the Gulf of Mexico`s dead zone?

    The Gulf of Mexico has the largest dead zone in the United States and the second-largest in the world. Dead zones form when excessive amounts of nitrogen and phosphorous wash into waterways and spur algal blooms, depleting the water of oxygen and killing fish, shrimp, and other marine life. The Gulf of Mexico dead zone can ...

  • Analysis of Selected Herbicides And Related Metabolites in a Coastal Lagoon Under The Influence of Water Runoff: Water Column

    Anthropogenic release of chemical contaminants, in particular pesticides coming from agricultural areas, significantly impacts European aquatic ecosystems. Pesticides and herbicides used in common agricultural practices, are applied only during specific periods of the year, leading to significant seasonal peak concentrations in fresh and coastal waters, particularly in spring after heavy rainfall ...


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