fish farm protection Articles

  • Development of Indonesian Fish Farming & Aquaculture Production

    Part 1.Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Part 2.Reasons Why Fishery Industry Develops Fast in Indonesia Part 3.Fish Farm Types in Indonesian Part 4.Sustainable Development of the Fishery in Indonesia Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Fish farming is the ...

  • Ecosystem management planning for farm conversion - case study

    Based on a survey that revealed unexpected plant and animal treasures, we developed an ecosystem management plan to harmonise activity with the environment. Based on a survey that revealed unexpected plant and animal treasures on a Western Cape Farm, we developed an ecosystem management plan to harmonise economic activity with the natural environment. Voorhoede Farm near Caledon in the ...

  • Shrimp farming: Why prevention is better than medicine

    Disease challenges that have affected a number of key shrimp production regions around the world in recent years have increased the focus on producing healthier and more robust stocks. In addition to establishing very strict sanitary requirements, many shrimp farmers have sought new health-specific diets across the shrimp lifecycle that progress growth and reduce bacterial challenges. Some, ...


    By Skretting - Nutreco Group

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • A Decade After Asian Tsunami, New Forests Protect the Coast

    The tsunami that struck Indonesia in 2004 obliterated vast areas of Aceh province. But villagers there are using an innovative microcredit scheme to restore mangrove forests and other coastal ecosystems that will serve as a natural barrier against future killer waves and storms. On the day that the Indian Ocean tsunami hit his village a decade ago, fisherman Hajamuddin was at sea. It was ...


    By Wetlands International

  • The number one thing each of us can do to protect biodiversity

    Reducing our consumption of animal products can go a long way toward conserving endangered habitat around the world. Agriculture expansion is the leading driver of natural habitat loss worldwide. However, most of this growth is not to produce vegetables, fruits or grains to be eaten by people. Ecosystems are destroyed overwhelmingly to feed livestock. Livestock production ...


    By Ensia

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Salmon aquaculture could incorporate seaweed and sea urchins to reduce nitrogen enrichment

    Farming fish together with seaweed and other species could help improve the sustainability of aquaculture and reduce pollution. A new study provides a tool for designing sustainable fish farming systems and calculates their potential to recycle waste. An example of a salmon farming system incorporating seaweed and sea urchins could reduce nitrogen releases to the environment by 45%. Over half of ...

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Modern strains put Lake Victoria in critical condition

    Pollution and overfishing in Lake Victoria have become so severe that scientists believe they threaten the health and livelihoods of millions of East Africans.   And researchers in the three countries bordering the ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Less Than 3 Percent of Oceans in Marine Parks Despite Recent Growth

    In May 1975, rising concerns about overfishing and deteriorating ocean health prompted scientists and officials from 33 countries to meet in Tokyo for the first global conference on marine parks and reserves. Noting the need for swift action to safeguard more of the sea, the delegates were unanimous in calling for the creation of a global system of marine protected areas (MPAs)—zones ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Mangrove coasts: a muddy story (Part 3)

    In my first blog, I introduced the term “ecosystem services”, which has become a popular way to refer to the value of ecosystems. This is an important concept as it provides a counter-argument to the often narrow-minded and short-eyed approach of ...


    By Wetlands International

  • The disappearing rivers of Bangladesh

    Bangladesh is a land of rivers, but changing climate has caused a third of the country’s more than 300 large rivers to disappear. The rivers are drying out as a result of barriers built upstream to divert water and protect people from floods that have become more frequent as the weather becomes more ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Water Preservation: What YOU Can Do

    If you’re presently reading this blog, you probably truly appreciate and understand something in which we all have a passionate interest. Water! We rely on water for hydration, irrigation, transportation, energy production, food production, weather patterns and so much more. Lakes, oceans, rivers and reservoirs across the Globe are part of the pillars that sustain life. If you are ...


    By Deep Trekker Inc.

  • Future Brief: Sustainable Aquaculture

    Is sustainable aquaculture possible? Aquaculture is facing a new era of expansion in Europe. What are the environmental implications of this, and how can the sector expand sustainably? This Future Brief from Science for Environment Policy presents an overview of research into aquaculture’s impacts, and considers how it could develop in harmony with environmental goals. The ...


    By European Commission

  • The most threatened ecosystem you’ve never heard of

    What covers up to 600,000 square kilometers (230,000 square miles) of Earth’s surface, provides benefits worth an estimated US$570 billion each year, and is rapidly being lost due to human activity? If you have not a clue, you’re far from alone. Scientists who study the underwater feature known as a seagrass meadow call it a “ ...


    By Ensia

  • Top trends conservationists should be paying attention to — but aren’t

    Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Soy entering valuable wetlands of the Paraná Delta, Argentina

    Due to the enormous emphasis on soybean cultivation within Argentina, activities such as cattle raising but also the cultivation of soybeans are increasingly pushed to more marginal and vulnerable areas, where the cost of land is lower. The Paraná Delta, one of the most unique and important wetlands regions in the world, is one of these places. Although the region is not ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Composting Advances in Oregon and Washington

    Over the years, different forces have served as drivers to help grow the composting industry. For example, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was the perceived landfill crisis that led to state bans on disposal of yard trimmings. Composting also has benefitted from a push to meet recycling goals, which has prompted states and local governments to go beyond yard trimmings and into such ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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